Outstanding Fayette County Grad/ Outstanding Contributor

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Davids mom
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Emily Desprez, a Teach For America teacher who graduated from Sandy Creek and Georgia Tech is a guest columnist in the AJC 2/20/12. Her column is worth reading.

Davids mom
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FC Grad makes contribution

Emily Desprez, a Teach For America teacher who graduated from Sandy Creek and Georgia Tech is a guest columnist in the AJC 2/20/12. Her column is worth reading.

http://www.ajc.com/opinion/snubbing-teach-for-america-1356022.html

wildcat
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DM - TFA

I am so sorry to hear about your mother. Please accept my sympathy. I wish the deep peace of the quiet earth to you.

Thanks for posting the link. This article may explain some of the reasoning behind Cobb not wanting TFA teachers.

http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/living-in-dialogue/2011/12/philip_kovac...

Although there are a myriad of reasons that Cobb County falls back on, I am guessing that a large factor is the money, right? After the initial $400,000, that was going to be donated by a private benefactor, from where was the rest of the money going to come? Who knows? Myself, I think it is a great program. Most young adults think they can save the world and what a great way to try. If we're lucky, some will find their calling and stay. If not, the kids that had young, energized teachers (as opposed to old and jaded) are very lucky kids indeed. I think it is a win-win situation no matter how it is sliced. These aren't education majors that are being put in the classroom; these are persons with degrees in a subject area. They absolutely know the subject matter. In my opinion, knowing the subject matter is the most important factor. The ability to teach is either there, or it isn't. It is a skill that can be honed, but knowing the material? If you don't know the material the kids will eat you alive. We've all had the brilliant professor that couldn't teach, right? But you can still soak up some of his/her awesomeness, learn a little by osmosis and come out better for it in the end.

Davids mom
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Wildcat

This is a perplexing problem - but I agree with you. My experience with Teach For America is that after two years, too large a group left the teaching profession. Teaching is not EASY!. (and no one goes into education to become famous and rich!) Even with the 'boot camp' approach and the enthusiastic desire to reach a child and enrich and encourage, a successful teacher needs almost as much practice as a doctor before being on their own Of course there are those who have a gift - but you are right about that - the 'gift' will only get you so far. Going into the profession should not be a 'last minute decision '. While developing an expertise in a specific academic area - one should begin participating in an actual classroom in their junior year in college. By observing master teachers; assisting in classroom planning and classroom management, teaching a lesson, a student can decide if being a classroom teacher is for them! When a teacher fails - children fail. Teachers should have on-going training even after receiving their certification. In todays world, our children are exposed to the current technology and advancements daily. Teachers must keep current in order to be relevant. We would not want a doctor who was not aware of current research for healing. In todays economy, we can't ignore the bottom line - and because of that, it may take a while to get our education offerings competitive again. (It makes no difference private or public - the quality of a properly trained teacher is an important issue at improving education in the US)

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