Opinion

Serving homeless people gives new perspective on our comforts

[Editor’s note: The following essay was the first place winner in the Peachtree City Rotary Club’s “Laws of Life” student essay contest. The author is Michael Carroll, sixth-grader at J.C. Booth Middle School.]

By Michael Carroll

Everybody thinks they know the true meaning of being grateful; they don’t.

I think the only people who know the true meaning of being grateful are the homeless. Read More»

Before there was 9-1-1

Carolyn Cary's picture

Way back in the year 1975, the state of Georgia decreed that each and every county must have an ambulance system, whether it was paid or volunteer.

Forty hearty Fayette Countians volunteered with about half of them going to school for six months in the evening and the other half during the second half of the year.

I was in the second class and am proud of my EMT number, 5025, indicating that just over 5,000 people in Georgia completed classes that first year. Currently the EMT numbers are reaching the 50,000 mark. Read More»

The state and the National Day of Prayer

Cal Thomas's picture

If one tries hard enough and is clever enough, one can find a federal judge to rule on just about anything.

The Freedom From Religion Foundation, a group of atheists and agnostics based in Madison, Wis., filed a lawsuit asking Judge Barbara Crabb to order the government to cease from its annual National Day of Prayer proclamation. Last month, Judge Crabb ruled in the group’s favor.

Congress established the day of prayer in 1952 and reaffirmed it in 1988. It occurs on the first Thursday of May [May 6, this week]. Read More»

When kids leave the nest . . .

Ronda Rich's picture

Lately, a couple of girlfriends have been lamenting the upcoming going of their children. Both will see their oldest graduate from high school shortly and edge closer to a life independent of Mama.

There have been several lunches and many more phone calls when one or the other has become weepy and said, “I know it’s going to be okay but it’s so hard. I can’t imagine life without my baby at home.”

Both of the children are choosing colleges away from home and one has even chosen to go clear across the country to a university in California. Read More»

The silent economic killer: Obama’s VAT proposal

Dick Morris's picture

When conservatives like Neal Boortz proposed the “fair tax” (a levy on consumption, not on income), we should have known that the Barack Obama left would seize on the proposal not as Boortz intended it to be — a replacement for the income tax — but as an addition to it. Now Obama has let it be known that the value-added tax, or VAT, is “on the table” as he casts about for taxes to lock in his gigantic levels of federal spending. Read More»

Financial meltdown intrigue in Greece: Should we care and why?

Dr. Mark W. Hendrickson's picture

The intertwined worlds of government and finance are swirling with drama not seen since the fall of Lehman Brothers in 2008. The epicenter of the current crisis is Greece.

The Aegean nation’s sovereign debt has been downgraded to “junk” status while talk of outright default by the Greek government has arisen. The very survival of the euro — the 11-year-old currency used by Greeks and over 300 million other Europeans — has been brought into question. Read More»

In healthcare issues, don’t repeat the costly mistakes made by states

Grace-Marie Turner's picture

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi famously said before Congress voted on her massive health overhaul legislation that “we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it.”

Now that the bill has been signed into law, the American people are finding a lot not to like — from a new federal requirement that every citizen must have expensive government-defined health insurance to a mandate that states dramatically expand access to their Medicaid programs. Read More»

It’s past time to free the U.S. Mail (from the taxpayers): Privatize it

William F. Shughart II's picture

The U.S. Postal Service is deeply in the red. Projecting a deficit of $238 billion over the next decade, its governors propose two solutions: halting Saturday delivery and raising stamp prices by 3 percent this year and 10 percent next.

According to the Postal Rate Commission, the savings from operating only five days a week and the extra revenue anticipated from a rate hike will, at long last, allow the USPS to achieve financial stability and stop the hemorrhaging of taxpayer funds. Read More»

With regional SPLOST in place, where next for transportation?

Benita Dodd's picture

The Georgia Legislature has finally approved a funding mechanism for transportation. Next comes the jockeying for placement on project lists among advocates, agencies and authorities for the various modes.

Just because there’s finally an opportunity for transportation funding, however, doesn’t mean throwing good money after bad. Taxpayers must be vigilant and demand sound solutions and bang for their buck – or their 1 percent sales tax, to be precise. Read More»

Judges go bad and public stays in dark

The world within our judicial branch can be a creepy place at times. The average citizen has no idea about some of the frolicking that takes place behind the scenes at some of our houses of justice. In fact, to be totally honest, I had to think very carefully before writing this out of fear of retribution from the Superior Court one day. But here we go. Read More»

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