Opinion

Letter insults all legal immigrants to U.S.

A recent letter (“Ramsey’s punitive approach to illegals is the wrong solution”) lamenting the intention of the Georgia legislature to prioritize enforcement of the laws regarding the crime of illegal immigration was an all too common insult to immigrants.

The use of the transparent term “anti-immigrant legislation” is an immediate tip off to the anti-enforcement agenda of the writer.

Immigrants, by federal definition, enter the USA lawfully. Escaping capture while crossing our borders in violation of our immigration laws does not make anyone an immigrant ... or an American. Read More»

Apologist for illegal aliens should grasp who pays for his leniency

Last Wednesday’s paper carried a letter by Mr. Ron Chandonia that touched on a topic that deserves, and is poised to receive, considerably more involvement nationally and in Georgia: illegal aliens.

First, lets understand basic terms. Aliens (not the ET kind) are people who are not citizens or nationals of the United States. They can be here legally (comply with entry and visitation term requirements, as many students, tourists, and workers do) or illegally (they do not comply with U.S. entry laws). We have a large number of both in the U.S. and in Georgia. Read More»

Cops enforcing law, not harrassing illegals

From the letter titled “Ramsey’s punitive approach,” the author first states that he is dismayed that Rep. Matt Ramsey is against spending “one penny to allow illegal immigrants to attend our schools.”

What part of illegal do you not understand? If you are in this country illegally, staying for any period of time does not make your stay legal. Read More»

New chairman must listen to, respect voters

On their way out of office, County Commission Chairman Jack Smith and Commissioner Eric Maxwell have demonstrated that Fayette voters made appropriate choices in the voting booth this year. Commissioner Maxwell’s latest escapade to embarrass incoming Commissioner Alan McCarty and overturn the will of the voters was a glaring example of the type of politics we don’t need in Fayette County. Read More»

German American WWII Internment (part 2 of 2)

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

Editor’s note: This is the second part of a two part column. The first part can be read at www.thecitizen.com

With disregard for station in life or in religious affiliation, scientists, educators, farmers, brewers, physicians, American police troops swept German American civilians through California and other coastal communities, on their way to internment camps during World War II. Read More»

Peachtree City UPDATES - Week of Dec. 6, 2010

Betsy Tyler's picture

Business Advisory from the Fire Department, Winterize Sprinkler Systems, December 20 Special Called Council Meeting, and more . . . Read More»

Every window a stage

Rick Ryckeley's picture

It could’ve been entitled “A Snapshot of Small Town America: A Short Film Suitable for All Ages.” Admission was free — free for all who had taken the time to sit, sip, and simply watch the show.

Sipping a vanilla chai and enjoying the ambiance the small town coffee shop had to offer, I sat and pondered how seemingly simple yet complex the world outside the picture window was. Having nothing better to do, I decided to watch for awhile.

First on the world stage outside the window, a middle-aged lady wearing a skin-tight shirt sauntered by announcing “Bringing Sexy Back.”

She wasn’t. Read More»

Get ready

David Epps's picture

Several days ago, a 15-year-old young lady said that she hadn’t decided what to give up for Advent. After a brief discussion, we clarified the fact that she had confused Advent with Lent. However she wasn’t exactly wrong. Read More»

What we can learn from Maxwell-McCarty tiff

Claude Paquin's picture

Anyone who has ever taken a course on how to use a computer program of one kind or another knows how, during the presentation, unexpected problems can pop up. That might upset a lot of people, but I once had an instructor who viewed every glitch as a ULO, an “unscheduled learning opportunity.” We all ended up learning something we didn’t intend to, and nobody got upset. Read More»

Justice is done in Connecticut

Dr. John A. Sparks's picture

Dr. William Petit stood on the steps of the New Haven Superior Court House in early November. A jury had just recommended the death penalty for one of the men who had assaulted and murdered his wife and daughters.

Though it was not his intent, he made such a compelling case for capital punishment that his remarks may well be regarded as having significantly stopped any momentum that the anti-capital punishment advocates have achieved in the last 45 years. Read More»