Opinion

So-called conservatives now are playthings of the rich who benefit most but contribute least

Dr. Mark Hendrickson’s article in last week’s Citizen is, I believe, representative of present day conservative intellectualism and its selective choices. The difficulty with intellectually selective choices in the end are their wrongheaded conclusions.

Example: WWI taught French military intellectuals that war favored a strong defense. They convinced the French people and political establishment to spend inordinate sums building an “impregnable” line. Read More»

Consider the many faces of Fayette this season

There is a tradition in our family of decorating the Christmas tree on Thanksgiving night. We endearingly call this time “Why I’m Thankful Hour.” We each take an ornament to place on the tree and say what we are thankful for this year.

We initially established this tradition in our home to encourage an attitude of gratitude in our two young daughters. It caught on so well with our friends and family members that now the Thankful Hour lasts for several hours and Thanksgiving is officially our girls’ favorite holiday. Read More»

Native Americans have original property rights

Re: “Honoring Bill Of Rights Day,” by Dr. Mark W. Hendrickson’s article in the Dec. 15 issue of The Citizen.

Dr. Hendrickson writes: “We poorly understand the elementary concept of rights ... The Declaration Of Independence specifies two essential points we need to understand about our rights: 1) They are God-given; 2) they are inalienable ... nobody has a right to anyone else’s property.”

Here we go again, assuming God has always been on our side. Neither God nor Jesus is mentioned in the U.S. Constitution. Nor are they mentioned in the Bill of Rights. Read More»

Xmas 2010

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

When people ask if it’s hard to come up with column ideas week after week, I snort derisively. You’ve gotta be kidding, I gloat. Can’t beat the ideas off with a stick.

Except when a holiday looms.

I suppose it’s a problem to those from whom regular offerings are expected – we need to produce something patriotic for the 4th of July, or romantic for Valentine’s, or thankful for Thanksgiving.

Or Christmas-y.

The preacher certainly faces this challenge, and so do the choirmaster, the storekeeper, the stand-up comic, even the cook. Read More»

Three generations of elves

Rick Ryckeley's picture

As far back as I can remember, there has been an elf who has visited our house right around the holiday. Now I know most people believe Santa is the boss and does all the heavy lifting, but he’s just the figurehead. As with any multinational corporation, it’s the people behind the big guy that actually do all the work. And when you’re talking about Santa, there’s a lot of behind.

Growing up at 110 Flamingo Street, we really only saw Santa once. That’s when I was 5; it was the night he fell off our roof and Mom had to call the fire department. Read More»

'Are you Santa?'

David Epps's picture

“Are you Santa?”

The question came from a little boy about 4 years old. I was sitting in a low beach chair enjoying the sand and sun of Florida a few years ago. I heard the shy voice and looked up from my book. The little tyke was staring intently and waiting for the answer to his question.

Looking around, as if to see if anyone were listening, I motioned him, to take a step or two closer, put my finger to my lips, and said, “Shhhhh!” Then I added, “Even Santa needs a vacation.”

His eyes lit up and he exclaimed, “I won’t tell anyone. I promise!” Read More»

Democrats have language problems

Cal Thomas's picture

Even Rosetta Stone, the language-learning software that promises individuals they’ll soon “dream in French,” would be hard-pressed to translate the language of Washington. The etymology surrounding the tax debate would stymie someone with a Ph.D. in linguistics.

Just following the numbers, not to mention the assertions, is enough to produce blank stares of incomprehension. There is a debate about whether the estate tax should jump from zero to 35 percent, or 55 percent. Some liberal congressional Democrats claim they won’t consider voting for the “compromise” unless it is 55 percent. Read More»

Honoring Bill of Rights Day

Dr. Mark W. Hendrickson's picture

Dec. 15 is Bill of Rights Day. This year is the 219th anniversary of the adoption of the first 10 amendments to the United States Constitution—the Bill of Rights.

Few Americans notice Bill of Rights Day. That isn’t surprising, since we have done such a poor job of upholding and abiding by its provisions. (From my perspective, only the Third Amendment is completely intact, while the Seventh, Ninth, and 10th have been most completely ignored. Check them out for yourself.) Read More»

Fayette Commission continues illogical bulldozing for West Bypass

Dennis Chase's picture

The final gathering of the current Fayette County commissioners was last Thursday night. The news for the citizens that will be impacted by Phase III of the West Fayetteville Bypass was not good. Not unexpected, but still unfortunate for many homeowners in that area.

The meeting was mostly uneventful until the commissioners returned from their executive session. It was then time for Jack Smith and Eric Maxwell to say goodbye. Read More»

Women who need help

Ronda Rich's picture

In a moment of not perfectly clear thinking, I agreed to sit on a panel composed of several women for a television show. The idea was that we so-called “experts” would answer questions posed by guys who wanted to know about the inside thinking of a woman.

“How can I know if a woman I have asked out, wants me to kiss her at the end of the date?” was one question.

An outspoken panelist, who jumped in to answer each question first and loudest, announced (and this is the gist, not the identical wording), “Oh, get real. If we agree to go out with you, we plan to kiss you.” Read More»