Opinion

A quick, sharp tongue

Ronda Rich's picture

My niece, Nicole, was saying the other day how a quick, sharp tongue is built into our DNA and how we need to watch what we say and how we say it.

If you haven’t already read between the lines, that was her attempt to be subtle and encourage me to watch what I say. Of course, it was a waste of her sweet breath, but I pretended to pay attention and agreed with what she said. Read More»

Apocalypse now? Why a radio preacher is wrong

Cal Thomas's picture

Politicians and political activists frequently declare the end of the world will occur if their candidate isn’t elected, or if the debt ceiling isn’t raised. Some conservative Christians think the end is on the way because of behavior and practices they judge immoral. Somehow the country, not to mention the planet, survives and when “doomsday” passes, the prognosticators live to predict Armageddon on another day. Read More»

Inflation: Food, fuel and the Fed

Dr. Mark W. Hendrickson's picture

As Americans increasingly feel the pinch of higher prices for food and fuel, the Federal Reserve’s QE2 policy of creating more money has been called into question. Asked if the Fed bore some responsibility for these vexing price increases, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke essentially replied, “It’s not our fault.” Instead, Bernanke blamed the price increases on “global supply and demand conditions.”

Is Chairman Bernanke correct? To use a well-known phrase: Not exactly. Read More»

Rationing hope: FDA’s cancer drug ban preview of the future

Grace-Marie Turner's picture

Great Britain’s national health agency late last year reaffirmed its decision to deny the breakthrough drug Avastin to patients with advanced breast cancer. Just days later, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) followed suit, denying treatment — and hope — to the 17,500 American breast cancer patients prescribed Avastin each year.

This is a sign of things to come. Under the new health overhaul law, far too many medical decisions will be made by bureaucrats — not doctors and patients. Read More»

A little soccer match

Loran Smith's picture

It was a sunny spring morning, and the Tigers were playing the Sparks in a soccer match for those who are yet to be enrolled in kindergarten.

The Tigers wore navy blue and were coached by Chris Martin. Coaching the Sparks was Jay Erickson. The teams were coed, a fact which went happily unnoticed by the young players. There are no issues at kiddie soccer matches.

The length of time for the quarters is left up to the coaches. They usually start with five-minute quarters, but as disinterest sets in, they become shorter. Read More»

Ga. Medicaid program needs a big dose of reality

Benita Dodd's picture

Much like the tale of the blind men and the elephant, proposals to reform Medicaid are influenced by the perspective: Taxpayers see lighter paychecks; beneficiaries see increased coverage; state budget writers see a spiraling commitment. Liberals see a need for a bigger program to cover more people and conservatives see an opportunity to do better with less government. Still, all are aware of this elephant in the room.

Without a doubt, the entitlement program for qualified low-income elderly, disabled, children and families is consuming an increasing portion of the state budget. Read More»

Expand voters’ rights to recall politicians who ignore promises

Howard Rich's picture

With American politicians still refusing to substantively address the looming consequences of their fiscal irresponsibility, it only makes sense that voters are feeling frustrated and powerless.

Last November’s elections sent an unambiguous message to leaders at all levels of government that unsustainable spending will no longer be tolerated – yet it’s becoming increasingly obvious that only a handful of leaders are heeding this message. Read More»

What would Jesus cut from the budget?

Dr. Shawn Ritenour's picture

That is the question asked by the left-leaning Christian organization, Sojourners, in its campaign of the same name. It is a most appropriate question, given the battle over the budget and given this time of year, not long after the most holy holiday of the year for Christians. Read More»

Should grand jury investigate Hearn?

The public comment portion of the meeting of county commissioners on May 12 was revealing. The comments were primarily directed at Commissioner Lee Hearn, who was absent. The comments were critical of his appointment of his first cousin Addison Lester III to the election board and the fact he did not reveal his relationship to Mr. Lester. In fact he tried to hide that information by stating he knew Mr. Lester from church. Read More»

People losing faith in county government

We’re well beyond the point of ridiculous on the newest appointment to the Fayette County Board of Elections. Commissioner Lee Hearn shouldn’t have been appointing his cousin to oversee his election results in the first place. Mr. Hearn is smart enough to know right from wrong. Read More»