Opinion

The summer of '99

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

The Summer of ’99 will go down in our personal history as one of the best we’ve had together.

We didn’t travel to speak of. Didn’t do much boating. The weather was not especially pleasant.

But this was the Summer of the Boat. This was the summer we refurbished, added to and made a 25-foot Nimble Nomad our own.

Two previous owners had loaded her with toys that would have taken us years to add. Life jackets for more people than the boat would comfortably carry. Electronics Dave had only dreamed of. Pots and pans, plates and tableware – even a tinkly little set of wind chimes. Read More»

Peachtree City UPDATES - Week of March 7, 2011

Betsy Tyler's picture

Concert tickets, safety reminders, project updates and more . . . Read More»

What day is it?

Rick Ryckeley's picture

I’ll be the first to admit it’s been a long time since I’ve known what day of the week it was. And for once, the guys at the fire department won’t laugh at me because of a story. If they’re honest, they’ll admit that they lose track of days as often as I do.

Now being confused isn’t a new state for me; just ask some of the guys I work with, but this time my befuddlement has nothing to do with getting older. It has to do with every day being Friday. Confused? Well, welcome to my world. Read More»

Warriors and heroes

David Epps's picture

On Feb. 13, 1970, I arrived for Recruit Training (now called “Basic Warrior Training”) at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S.C., and was assigned to 2nd Battalion, Platoon 223.

My father warned me that it would be tough. I had no idea just how tough. I had played football in junior high and high school for five years and for one season after high school. I lifted weights and had been taking karate lessons for about four years. I thought I was prepared. I was not. Read More»

President becomes chief judge, nullifies law

Cal Thomas's picture

President Obama has said his view of same-sex “marriage” is “evolving.” Apparently he thinks that the law should be based on a kind of Darwinian jurisprudence which allows it to “evolve” and become whatever the ruling politicians at a given moment say it is (or isn’t). Read More»

Mission creep at the EPA

Dr. Harold Brown's picture

Any bureaucracy worth its name seeks to increase its reach and budget, sometimes expanding the former to justify the latter. Nowhere is that tendency more apparent recently than in the federal Environmental Protection Agency. Read More»

In Wisconsin, a battle for America’s soul

Dr. Mark W. Hendrickson's picture

[Editor’s note: A version of this article was first published by the Christian Science Monitor.]

It is hard to overstate what is at stake in the dramatic showdown between Wisconsin’s teachers and their Republican governor and legislature. The political and economic course of our country hinges on how the issue of public-sector unions is resolved, in Wisconsin and elsewhere.

For the sake of our country’s political and economic future, Gov. Scott Walker and his Republican colleagues need to prevail in the current contest with the Wisconsin teachers’ union and their allies. Read More»

What is special about unspectacular Ray Goff

Loran Smith's picture

Ray Goff’s name never set the record books ablaze, not even in the seventies, his time as Georgia’s quarterback. He didn’t earn his keep by throwing the football, which is the route to statistical honor, but he had abundant passing superlatives as a high school signal caller, which enhanced his quarterback reputation. Read More»

Without cap and tax, U.S. has reduced carbon emissions

Dick Morris's picture

While the federal Environmental Protection Administration is about to impose regulations and taxes on carbon emissions by executive fiat — in the name of stopping global climate change — the United States has already dramatically cut its emissions and probably has already complied with the Kyoto/Copenhagen goals for reduced emissions.

And this has been done without taxes, without regulations and without government intervention. Read More»

The calling of a screen door . . .

Ronda Rich's picture

There is something about the banging of a screen door – soft, sweet and low – that warms the innards of my being.

Perhaps it is that it takes me back through a journey of memories to a time when everyone I loved was still alive. That is, I suppose, the greatest loss of innocence for me, though there have been many. For I failed to realize then that so many folks I cherished would all too soon become mere memories decorated by names etched in stone. Mortality was something I simply did not understand nor cared to comprehend. Read More»

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