Opinion

Brown not allowed to present referendum idea

On June 9, 2011 Commissioner Steve Brown was listed on the commissioners’ meeting agenda to speak on HB240. Under HB240, the funding for infeasible or impractical SPLOST projects may be put to a referendum vote. If the public decides it does not want those projects, their funding may be used to reduce debt or property taxes.

But for that to happen, the commissioners must first agree to a referendum. Brown brought with him a 20-page PowerPoint presentation he had prepared to help communicate what he had to say. He gave copies to the other four commissioners before the meeting started. Read More»

June 9 meeting ‘most embarrassing to date’

I have attended the Fayette County Commission meetings for the last year or so, and I will admit that the meeting of June 9 was the most embarrassing to date. A major number of the public attendees were there in response to seeing how this county was going to treat House Bill 240.

To have this tabled, after having the agenda agreed upon by all commissioners at the start of the meeting, was poor judgment by the chair. Read More»

Why is bypass so crucial?

Why does the bypass have such strong support from commissioners Frady, Hearn and Horgan? Do you ever ask yourself that question?

The road goes nowhere, it is wasting millions of dollars and there has never been a road study to support why it should be built.

The hidden force that has convinced the group of three, that this road is a must build, should make most people with common sense more then a little suspicious of the commissioners’ motivations.

I say hidden force because those people have never come forth to the public to state their reasons for supporting this road project. Read More»

PTC, honor and other intemperate thoughts: Haddix deserves censure

The ongoing saga involving our current and former mayors can best be described as nothing more than blight upon the reputation of our fair city. For a sitting mayor to accuse anyone of conducting city business while intoxicated (or partly) literally years after the fact and not surfacing the issue when it allegedly occurred demonstrates a character flaw I call cowardice. If it did not occur, then the man has proven himself a purveyor of prevarication. Again. Read More»

Help bring the Appling Sword back to Georgia

In 2011 Georgia residents have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to contribute in a tangible way to preserving a unique part of Georgia history: bringing the Appling Sword back to Georgia.

The Appling Sword is an elaborate ceremonial sword commissioned by the Georgia Legislature in 1814 to be presented to Lt. Col. Daniel Appling, a native of Georgia and a hero of the War of 1812. Read More»

More on canes and walking sticks

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

A recent column about canes and walking sticks has generated comments from people I meet, all favorable, of course. I still get around without one, although there are days when I wish I’d brought it along. Read More»

Peachtree City UPDATES - Week of June 13, 2011

Betsy Tyler's picture

Planning Commission & Council Agendas, Rolling out the Red (and white and blue patriotic) Carpet, Grill Safety, Graduation Banners, and more . . . Read More»

Lessons from a road trip

David Epps's picture

In my nine months of being a Harley-Davidson rider, I have had a few adventures and have learned a few lessons. Some lessons were learned on a recent road trip out of state.

For example, I learned that one should always check the weather report. I also learned that it doesn’t really matter if you check your own weather report if you don’t also check the weather reports at your destination — and along the route. Read More»

True price of air conditioning

Rick Ryckeley's picture

The Wife just stood there. First she giggled; then she started to laugh. And for a change, the laughter wasn’t directed at me. Her mirth was in response to what I thought was a simple question.

“Where did the large black spot on the inside of the bedroom dresser drawer come from?” The answer she finally gave was so unique it had to be true. It was a tar ball stain. But that’s the end of the story. This is the beginning. Read More»

Gas prices, public comments, sneaky council

Scott Bradshaw's picture

Most Georgians depend on cars, trucks or diesel-burning equipment for their livelihood. A hypothetical commuter driving 70 miles round trip at 18 miles per gallon paid approximately $500 annually for gas in early 2009. This commuter is now paying $1,100 per year for the same trip to work. The cost of commercial airline fuel has increased by more than 50 per cent in the past year, raising ticket prices and lowering corporate bottom lines. Read More»

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