Opinion

We’ve sent all our good jobs overseas

Tea Party Republicans see the crisis as the government employs too many people. American corporations are making higher profits by not employing Americans but cheaper overseas labor, now their consumers. Read More»

Company's still coming

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

Company’s coming. I know that’s not news. It’s been the subject of this space plenty of times, and will for many more.

The cleaning has been ongoing for weeks already, and now the parts of the house that were cleaned first are, naturally, ready for dusting again.
There’s no good reason that I should want windows bright and carpets clean. That is by a husband’s reckoning.

“You act like it’s a big deal,” says the aforementioned husband. “It’s only Mary, and she’s only your daughter, after all.” Read More»

Peachtree City UPDATES - Week of August 1, 2011

Betsy Tyler's picture

Council Workshop & Meeting, National Night Out, Community Garden, History Timeline Presentation, and more . . . Read More»

Denis LaLanne and the pain that can’t be spoken of

Loran Smith's picture

BIARRITZ, France – For the first time in almost three decades of a warm and uplifting friendship, Denis LaLanne greeted me with sad eyes. The reason is readily understood, but first, it is appropriate to recall the good times. There were many. Read More»

Bug school

Rick Ryckeley's picture

The first day of school is tougher on some than others. Whether you look forward to this day or dread its dawning depends on where you stand in the pecking order of society.
For the next week, parents will pull kids from one back-to-school sale to the next, trying their best not to lose tempers with offspring who are anything but attentive to the task at hand.

But if we search our memories, our real memories, we’ll remember what it was like and how we too felt on that first day of school. Welcome, dear reader, to the first day at Bug School. Read More»

Listening and doing

David Epps's picture

When I arrived at the rifle range at Parris Island, S.C., the home of the Marine Corps Recruit Training Depot, I had never fired a rifle for any kind of score or on any occasions that really mattered.

Oh, I plunked a few tin cans on my dad’s property, but that was just with a .22. The 11-pound 7.62 mm M-14 rifle was something altogether different. It was a warrior’s weapon and the nation was at war. At 19 years old, I knew I was in over my head and my only chance to qualify was to listen to the instructors and do whatever I was told. Read More»

A visit with Coach Mickey Matthews

Loran Smith's picture

HARRISONBURG, Va. – A man can pull up roots and become reestablished, especially if he is a football coach and finds peace in the valley which is the way it is for Mickey Matthews, a West Texan who is surrounded by more trees in his comfortable neighborhood here than there were in the entire county where he grew up. Read More»

Priorities of local government — Part III

Cal Beverly's picture

I shifted one word in the column title, from “essentials” to “priorities.”

That’s the shift that some local governments need to make as well: Determine what local government services are absolutely essential and then prioritize from that point.

In my first column, I put “Public Safety” at the head of the list of absolute essentials. “If government does nothing else, it must keep our persons and our property safe from attack, confiscation and destruction,” I said in Part I. Read More»

And now, even Norway . . .

Cal Thomas's picture

When parents send their children off to summer camp, they reasonably expect them to return refreshed and more attuned with the world than when they left home. Even in their wildest nightmares, they don’t foresee them returning in a pine box. Read More»

The continuing failure of Obamanomics

Lance McMillian's picture

One of the first lessons of political spin is, whenever possible, to release damaging information on a late Friday afternoon before a holiday weekend. The theory: no one is paying attention anyway.

Applying this lesson well, the White House quietly published a report before the July 4th weekend by the White House Council of Economic Advisors — a group of three economists chosen by President Obama — that laid out the dismal effect of the stimulus on job creation: $666 billion spent to create only 2.4 million jobs, for an astronomical total of $278,000 per job. Read More»

Recent Comments