Opinion

Irony, part deaux

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

This column originally ran Sept.29, 1998.

Hooray, I thought, when AAA in Wilmington, N.C. let me borrow a telephone line to e-mail a story back to The Citizen. After an embarrassing failed attempt at the local newspaper office, I was in business now.

But when I was ready to send, I got the same perplexing message: No Dial Tone. I switched a telephone to the jack I was using and got a dandy dial tone — just not with the computer.

Stay calm, I told myself, clammy with frustration — not to mention dread of telling Dave he had been waiting in the parking lot for nothing. Read More»

'Could you be more specific?'

'Could you be more specific?'

Glenn McCoy editorial cartoon — Secret Service radio call: "Agent Smith, do you see anyone at the White House that doesn't belong there?" Agent relies, "Could you be more specific?"

'I can help you throw away your medal'

'I can help you throw away your medal'

Cip Bok editorial cartoon — Secretary of State John Kerry to President Barack Obama: "I can help you throw away your medal."

You'll never go wrong...

Rick Ryckeley's picture

Got an urgent phone call from The Boy yesterday. The serious tone in his voice immediately captured my attention. So much so that the ribbing I was going to give him about Little One kissing a duck while feeding them out at Twin Lakes that very morning would obviously have to wait.

He said, “Dad, I need your advice about what to do.”

I must say, hearing those words made me feel good. Not because The Boy was asking for advice in his time of difficulty, but because he had asked ME for it. Read More»

The lesson of corporal punishment

David Epps's picture

According to a report in GOPUSA, “Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson says he never intended to hurt his 4-year-old son when he hit him with a tree branch (switch). But experts in childhood development said the intent doesn’t matter — striking a child is never appropriate.” Apparently, my parents never got the memo.

I was, what was called in my neck of the woods, a “precocious” child. One definition of “precocious” is “ahead in development, such as the mental development of a child.” Read More»

War — A matter of semantics

Dr. Earl Tilford's picture

“Mankind must put an end to war, or war will put an end to mankind.”
— President John F. Kennedy

For most people, war is an unthinkable horror. While generals must think realistically about war, an important duty for a political leader is to inspire others to do the unthinkable.

Modifiers attempt to qualify war with words like limited, total, defensive, preemptive, just, unjust, good, bad, glorious, tragic, legal, illegal, etc. Read More»

What Jack Ma can re-teach U.S.

Cal Thomas's picture

In the fairy tale “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves,” Ali Baba, a poor woodcutter, is in the forest when he hears a group of robbers approaching on horseback. Afraid, he climbs a tree and hears one of the men say, “open sesame.” A door opens in a rock and the men go in, the door shutting behind them when another says, “close sesame.”

When they leave, Ali Baba climbs down and approaches the rock. He says, “open sesame” and it opens for him. Inside he discovers jewels and gold, which he takes, becoming rich himself. Read More»

Who wants war?

Thomas Sowell's picture

Some pundits are saying that President Obama has been floundering in his response to the ISIS crisis because public opinion polls show most Americans don’t want another war.

In all my 84 years, I cannot recall a time when most Americans wanted war. That is something we should be proud of. But wars are not always optional. Read More»

History is better than fiction

Ronda Rich's picture

Several weeks ago, I wrote about moonshine runner turned stock car champion, Lloyd Seay, who was murdered in a dispute over sugar purchased to make illegal whiskey. Read More»

Booth Lego League champs need help

When the rookie J.C. Booth “Tsunami Warrior” team became the state champions in the first Lego League Robotics Challenge, they created a big problem for STEM education in Fayette County. Their success has created such demand for this exciting STEM learning program that more than 80 eager students signed up to fill the 20 planned slots.

The problem was that there was no school budget for the additional Lego robotics equipment required to field this many teams. Booth science teacher, and Robotics Head Coach, David Carnow had a tough choice to make. Read More»