Letters to the Editor

Lawsuit appeal funds could be better used for education

Recently our school board announced that they will appeal the recent U.S. District Court decision requiring district voting for Fayette County. While I agree that it is better to have all five school board members accountable to the entire community, I have to question whether this is a good use of our scarce school tax dollars. Read More»

‘SCHS’s dogma of the day’

To some within the Fayette County Board of Education, Sandy Creek High School’s seven-period day schedule may seem excessive and even unfair relative to scheduling at the other high schools. Academic teachers receive two “off“ periods (one being a traditional planning period and the other being a Professional Learning Community, or PLC, period designated for sharing best practices, staff development, etc.). Read More»

Consolidation: Where’s the fire?

In order to further understand the issue about the county wanting to take over the city of Fayetteville’s fire department, I did a little research on how a “city” works.

First of all a “city” is much like a non-profit organization, meaning it must pay for all the services it offers and all the employees’ wages within these services with money “donated” in several different ways. The most obvious of these is through a property tax based on a “millage rate.” Read More»

District voting and who really gets disenfranchised

Many years ago, I learned about the representative democracy we enjoy from Mr. Hill, my government teacher.
 
At the federal level there are 435 U.S. Representatives of which I get to vote for one. I don’t get to vote for all 435, only one.
 
There are 100 U.S. Senators in the Senate and I get to vote for two to represent my interests, not all 100 but strictly two.
 
At the state level there are 180 state representatives in Georgia of which I get to vote for one.

District voting rests on a lie

Stop the insanity, Ms. Learnard? Accept district voting? Destined to lose? History proves this district voting is how it must be because scores of counties in Georgia have had to accept it?

What I read is that Fayette County should not stand against tyranny that travels under the banner of fairness. It will cost too much? If not Fayette, what Georgia county can afford this stand against untruth? Read More»

Mayor: Consolidation makes sense

Emotions are high in the anti-consolidation faction; there may be more heat than light so allow me to shed some light on the subject from the mayor’s viewpoint.

1. The city of Fayetteville and Fayette County both have outstanding fire departments, as someone pointed out at the joint public meeting held in the county meeting chambers on 4/10/14.

2. In order to be good stewards of our citizens’ tax dollars in this prolonged recession, both the city and the county have very tight budgets, but neither are in any danger of financial collapse. Read More»

The evidence of Christ’s resurrection is compelling

Almost two thousand years ago the single most important and profound event in the history of mankind is alleged to have occurred.

But is the resurrection of Jesus from the dead truly a fact of history or is it a myth that is still around simply because people want to believe it?

Consider that the rise of the Christian faith began in Jerusalem right after the crucifixion with a belief in the resurrection. Read More»

Thanks to Fayette County

This open letter was started as a thank you note and has grown to become a love letter.

I moved my family to Fayette County in 1987. Like most of you, my wife Bonnie and I came for the great schools and the very low crime. We still had young children at home and our last home didn’t feel as safe as it had just a few years earlier. Read More»

DAR honors Carla McMillian

Each year the Peachtree City chapter, Fayette-Starr’s Mill, of the Daughters of the American Revolution select a notable woman of history in Fayette County. March is officially “Women’s History Month” so the chapter uses this occasion to acknowledge the outstanding contributions of the woman of the chapter’s choice. Read More»

Jones: ‘What would you do?’

[Editor’s note: The Citizen posed several questions to John E. Jones, one of the plaintiffs in the Voting Rights Act lawsuit, following the close of qualifying for the upcoming primary elections. The questions follow Mr. Jones’ response below.]

The most important thing I can tell you is that the lawsuit is a result of a violation of the Voting Rights Act more so than a discrimination lawsuit.

The NAACP never wanted to sue and truly hoped for an out of court settlement.

During the qualifying period, candidates were totally free to run or withdraw as they see fit. Read More»

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