Letters to the Editor

Red Hell: A Christmas story about life’s intricate connections

As an 8-year-old, I never really gave much thought to those two words, coined years earlier, I suppose, as the unofficial name for a community of hard-working people. No grass grew there; when it rained, it was muddy, when the weather was dry, it was dusty.

Christmas morning, 1942: Early risers were we three boys, ages 10, 8, and 4. World War Two was on everyone’s minds, and we knew not to expect a lot from Santa. But, we never had much before the war, either. Read More»

It’s Steele who ends up being divisive

You will recall how Peachtree City Mayor Don Haddix was chastised as our proposed representative to Regional Transportation Roundtable (RTR), a group mandated by House Bill 277 for structuring a region-wide sale tax referendum for transportation.

Haddix simply suggested that we look into joining the Three River Region to the south instead of remaining in the ARC. Afterward, Haddix received a stinging reprisal, something akin to a smear campaign, saying he had tarnished our county’s image in our region with his talk. However, nothing could have been further from the truth. Read More»

Tax rates have no effect on job creation

Raising top tax rates for high income individuals kills jobs – right? At least that’s what I keep hearing from politicians and pundits.

Here is the argument: Most small business income taxes are paid by the business owners (because these businesses are typically “flow through” entities like S-corporations, partnerships, etc.). Many of these business owners have high incomes. If you tax these people more, their businesses will have less money to hire people. This is part of the reason we just increased the federal debt by $544 billion to extend the Bush tax cuts for two years. Read More»

So-called conservatives now are playthings of the rich who benefit most but contribute least

Dr. Mark Hendrickson’s article in last week’s Citizen is, I believe, representative of present day conservative intellectualism and its selective choices. The difficulty with intellectually selective choices in the end are their wrongheaded conclusions.

Example: WWI taught French military intellectuals that war favored a strong defense. They convinced the French people and political establishment to spend inordinate sums building an “impregnable” line. Read More»

Consider the many faces of Fayette this season

There is a tradition in our family of decorating the Christmas tree on Thanksgiving night. We endearingly call this time “Why I’m Thankful Hour.” We each take an ornament to place on the tree and say what we are thankful for this year.

We initially established this tradition in our home to encourage an attitude of gratitude in our two young daughters. It caught on so well with our friends and family members that now the Thankful Hour lasts for several hours and Thanksgiving is officially our girls’ favorite holiday. Read More»

Native Americans have original property rights

Re: “Honoring Bill Of Rights Day,” by Dr. Mark W. Hendrickson’s article in the Dec. 15 issue of The Citizen.

Dr. Hendrickson writes: “We poorly understand the elementary concept of rights ... The Declaration Of Independence specifies two essential points we need to understand about our rights: 1) They are God-given; 2) they are inalienable ... nobody has a right to anyone else’s property.”

Here we go again, assuming God has always been on our side. Neither God nor Jesus is mentioned in the U.S. Constitution. Nor are they mentioned in the Bill of Rights. Read More»

Gas carts: Rights trump smells

Mayor Haddix, I supported your election, but now wonder who I supported. In your article on Wednesday, 12/8, you opine about a variety of subjects, notably gas powered golf carts.

Recently I was in a spirited debate in this paper that ended up in the theater of the absurd. It started when I wrote to support the rights of those who have gas powered golf carts, despite my own loathing of the disgusting choice (noise, carbon emission and sometimes smells vs. quiet, little or no carbon and fresh air). Read More»

Be a responsible giver if you choose a dog

There’s isn’t a more endearing holiday image than the vision of a child sitting by the tree on Christmas morning as she lifts the lid of a brightly decorated box and out pops a fluffy, adorable puppy. The light in her eyes as she cuddles the pup is nothing short of magical, and worth every effort you spent in acquiring this most perfect of gifts.

Because of this very delightful mental picture, and because many children will plead all year for a furry friend of their very own, Christmas is a popular time to attain the family pet. Read More»

Carter correct on North Korea

Dr. Paul Kengor’s recent editorial, “Duped again on North Korea,” presented a rather bizarre interpretation of former President Jimmy Carter’s success in negotiating with North Korea and his portrayal of Carter as unaware of the poverty and starvation in the country is completely false. I personally track North Korea and write weekly reports for him detailing the harsh conditions in the country. Read More»

We should be grateful for revelations of foreign policy from Wikileaks

William Murchison’s latest column, “Those whom the gods would destroy” regarding the Wikileaks is laughable. He basically makes the argument that the New York Times and other papers are shamefully unpatriotic for publishing “classified” diplomatic cables and other government documents that may be embarrassing but surely do not seriously damage the national security. Read More»