Editorial

The push for another layer of government

Cal Beverly's picture

On the opposite page, Georgia’s governor, Nathan Deal, lays out his vision of the state’s most pressing need: More money for “transportation infrastructure.”

Peachtree City state Rep. Matt Ramsey also weighs in across the page on the need for less “backward looking” and more attention to those things that might improve the economy of our area. More about that later.

I agree with Gov. Deal about the need for upkeep and improvement of some parts of our transportation infrastructure. I disagree with his means to get there. Read More»

A child’s memories of World War II

Carolyn Cary's picture

The time was Dec. 7, 1941 and I had just turned 9 years old five days before. My mother, younger sister and I were sitting in the living room listening to the radio. I remember it was a big behemoth piece of furniture that sat on the floor and was probably five feet high.

I remember distinctly hearing President Franklin D. Roosevelt declaring war. I can remember him saying, “We have nothing to fear, but fear itself.”

How can I remember this? No, I didn’t know what war was, but I never before nor after saw “that” expression on my mother’s face, one of alarm and dread. Read More»

The fallen banner of Regionalism

Cal Beverly's picture

After incumbents get beat unexpectedly — at least unexpected by the incumbents — pundits usually feel compelled to pundificate on “what it all means.”

I will resist that temptation since I have no idea what “it all means.” I do have a few ideas about what some of it means. (You are free to assign whatever weight you believe appropriate to my pundificating — or my bloviating, as one soon-to-be ex-mayor dubbed my editorial efforts.)

A tip of the hat to old Tip O’Neill, who immortalized the truism, “All politics is local.”

Local. Not regional. Read More»

Back then . . . Schoolbus drivers owned their rides

Carolyn Cary's picture

In the mid 1950s there were six school buses in the county, all owned by farmers or small business owners in Fayetteville.

When I came to town in 1966, there were 11 school buses, 10 of them privately owned, one owned by the school board.

In the fall of 2011 there are 210 school buses on the road each day, all owned by the school board.

In talking with one of those privately-owned bus owners, Reuben Knowles, he told me that he was responsible for its maintenance and liability insurance. Read More»

Emergence of Fluoridegate – Part III

Ben Nelms's picture

It was reported a few months ago in this column that something called Fluoridegate is on the horizon. The issue was and is the consumption of fluoride in drinking water and other sources and the deleterious health effects that result from it. The column also stated that the handwriting is on the wall for the days of water fluoridation. The dawning of that day has begun. Read More»

The new government religion: Regionalism

Cal Beverly's picture

Remember these two principles of folks with a conservative or libertarian world-view? “That government is best which governs least.” And “local government is the most representative because it is closest to the people it governs.”

And let’s throw in a third principle enunciated by the late Democrat Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Thomas P. “Tip” O’Neill (a liberal, back before that word was replaced by “progressive”): “All politics is local.” Read More»

Election season memories: First vote was for Ike

Carolyn Cary's picture

It’s election time, and I am reminded of the first time I was old enough to vote.

In Ohio, you had to be 21 years of age to vote. The year was 1952 and it was a national election. I voted for the first time by voting for Dwight D. Eisenhower.

I have made every effort to vote in each election since, whether national or local. The only Fayette County elections I have not bothered with were when the mayor and council in Fayetteville would be running unopposed. Read More»

What I Will be doing for 9-11

Carolyn Cary's picture

This is what I Will be doing to honor the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11th:

I Will pray for those family members who were left motherless, fatherless, brother-less, sister-less from the deaths of nearly 3,000 people on Sept. 11, 2001.

I Will continue to be a volunteer in my community.

I Will spend the day thinking about all the friends and acquaintances I have lost this year.

I Will pray for the safety of our men and women in military uniform.

I Will pray for those first responders who worked at Ground Zero and now have cancer. Read More»

Part 2: What does ‘essential’ mean locally?

Cal Beverly's picture

We began a conversation last week about defining the essential functions of local government. I placed as my number one priority public safety.

I have since been challenged online about what “essential” really means. The assertion was that I define “essential” based on my biases. So let’s see if we can come to a common agreement on our terms.

Let me be more precise: I define “essential” as closer to an absolute rather than a relative term.

For example, judge between these two choices: Read More»

Local government: What is essential?

Cal Beverly's picture

I pose the big question in the headline above so that we can begin a discussion about what we can reasonably expect from our local governments. This is part one.

Before that, let’s focus on one single word that forms the basis for all the laws of economics: Scarcity.

Economist Thomas Sowell (the wisest man in the Western Hemisphere, in my opinion) puts it this way: “What does ‘scarce’ mean? It means that what everybody wants adds up to more than there is. ... There has never been enough to satisfy everybody completely.” Read More»

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