Editorial

Picture of a poor childhood

Ronda Rich's picture

A picture — even one old that has faded from black and white to soft gray — can a tell a story, long and true. That one certainly did.

It was made somewhere in the late 1920s and showed three children, ragamuffins really, who did not have the happiness that most children show in photos today. Read More»

A queasy feeling about truth in PTC

John Munford's picture

In the journalism business when you run across a Truth Teller, you value them. You respect them. You trust them. Particularly when they prove to be right over and over again.

Truth Tellers are willing to share everything of public record with you, warts and all, even if it might make themselves or their agency look the slightest bit bad. They tend to have a thick skin and understand that at the end of the day, all public good is served by being OPEN and most of all, telling the TRUTH. Both openness and truth in government lead to credibility. Read More»

Spelling and the past

Carolyn Cary's picture

I was a good speller in school. Eighth grade was a long time ago, but I believe I won most of the spelling contests.

I don’t remember that class I had in college that required spelling, but I remember the professor asking for the spelling of the second month of the year. I will always hear him saying, “Febrooary.” Anyone not spelling it correctly just wasn’t listening.

I was privileged to work at the Peachtree Executive Conference Center (now the Wyndham) its first 13 years. I did the public relations and the signage for the restaurant, the bars and the meeting rooms. Read More»

Enough philosophizing; produce real solutions

Michael Boylan's picture

Philosophizing can be fun. Who doesn’t like thinking and arguing, pontificating and theorizing, debating and discussing? It’s good activity for the brain, if not for one’s stress levels.

There’s a time and a place for philosophy though. It’s called college. Or it can be a dinner party with other people who enjoy that kind of thing.

The one place it needs to vacate though — at least for the time being — is government. Read More»

July 31 vote: What does it all mean?

Cal Beverly's picture

Power. Who has it, and who hasn’t.

That’s what the July 31 vote results — and any election — mean.

So who has the power we the people have delegated to them for the next two to four years?

Answers to that in a second. Let’s first deal with that strange fowl, the lame duck.

Here are Fayette County’s lame ducks — elected officials still in power until Jan. 1, 2013 but forbidden or unable to exercise effective power after that date:

Sheriff — Wayne Hannah. Expect no problems here. There will be a smooth transition. Read More»

When Olympic flame came here

Carolyn Cary's picture

Let’s remember the 1996 Olympics, you know, when it came through Fayette County.

There were 12 honored folks here who carried the Olympic torch some of the distance from Greece to Atlanta right through Fayette County.

One precious torch bearer died shortly after; one carried the torch strapped to his wheel chair. We came in all sizes, shapes and colors. Read More»

Whether paid or not, volunteer firefighters remain on the job

Carolyn Cary's picture

There was a discussion at the Fayetteville City Hall recently as to whether the city fire department should remain a part of the city, or join with the county fire department.

Many people in authority spoke and various charts were shown. The possible savings were expressed but there was one side not available on charts.

The opinion of the firemen could only be expressed in person. And they did. Read More»

Double bankruptcy Barlow bad for Fayette County

I believe this information is critical to the voters of Fayette County. Read More»

TSPLOST: About mobility or money?

Benita Dodd's picture

The “Untie Atlanta” commercials on radio and TV are nothing if not clever. Frustrated commuters can relate to the visual onslaught on TV of roads tangled in a giant knot and the radio announcement, accompanied by blaring horns, that says “Traffic in metro Atlanta is tied up in knots ... Let’s untie the knot. Vote yes for the July 31 Regional Transportation Referendum.” Read More»

Remembering Mom’s baking

Carolyn Cary's picture

Things I take pleasure in remembering: when my mother baked pies, after rolling out what she needed for the crust, she would slice the remaining dough into 2-inch wide strips. The strips would be plastered with a cinnamon mixture and rolled up and baked. I can still remember that delicious smell.

My dad worked evenings at Firestone when I was in grade school. He was usually still sleeping when I went to school in the mornings. But if it was raining he would get up early and drive me to school. Read More»