Editorial

Election season and letters’ policy

As the local political season gets started, we’ve seen an increase in letters to the editor from announced candidates. To maintain a level playing field, here are the ground rules for local political letters through December.

From this point on until qualifying day, no candidates for any local office will be given free print space to publicize their campaigns (with one exception, described below). Things like websites and campaign email addresses will be deleted from letters. Read More»

Going to funerals

Carolyn Cary's picture

I sure have been to a lot of funerals in the past year. I guess when you become older than dirt, that happens.

One funeral was conducted by a preacher who loved to sing. Not only did he lead the congregation in song, but when he followed the deceased up the aisle, he was belting out a song with all he had. And yes, he was good at it.

At another funeral, the deceased for decades had always sat in the same seat. If you’re a church-goer, you know that the faithful will always sit in the same spot, and woe be to those who dare to occupy that spot. Read More»

Mike’s last column for The Citizen

Michael Boylan's picture

[Editor’s note: Last week, we here at The Citizen said goodbye to one of our family members, Michael Boylan. He is taking over responsibility for producing the content of several local magazines stretching across north Georgia. This is Mike’s last column for The Citizen.]

To the new guy at my (very big) desk:

Over the past week and a half I have been trying to tell you everything I learned in my 14 years at The Citizen. Read More»

20 years later, it’s still a rollercoaster

Cal Beverly's picture

The title atop the column in this space two decades ago was, “The rollercoaster ride begins.”

It was my first column in the first issue of this newspaper — Feb. 10, 1993.

Most of the names on that first masthead are gone, including one signally important one — Dave Hamrick, the first managing editor of what was then called The Fayette Citizen.

He died in 2002 at age 51 as he was playing soccer in a local over-40 league, after getting the paper out earlier that Tuesday. After getting the paper out. Read More»

Remembering Sambo

Carolyn Cary's picture

I moved to Fayetteville in April 1966. While in the process of moving boxes in, my 6-year-old son fell off his tricycle onto the concrete driveway, causing a few gashes on his forehead.

I don’t remember who we called to find a doctor, but we were led to a small white clinic that sat beside the Fayetteville Methodist Church.

Forty-eight years later, my son still has a couple of thin scars from that event.

This was my first introduction to Dr. Ferrol Aubrey Sams, Jr. For the next 40 years I or my children were a patient of his. Read More»

Bad governing has local addresses

Cal Beverly's picture

Since there are plenty of words about gun control this week available nearby, I will postpone Part 2 of my attempt at logic, “Guns and governing philosophy” for another week. (Is that cheering I hear?)

This week, I need to do some catching up on local issues.

First off, despite a painful exchange at a City Council meeting this month, Peachtree City has settled into an uneasy peace, pending mayoral candidate jousts sure to be forthcoming.

I want to bring back to your attention a matter of some constitutional import, since that notion seems much in the news these days. Read More»

Editorial cartoon for Jan. 30, 2013

Editorial cartoon for Jan. 30, 2013

Editorial cartoon by Chip Bok for The Citizen, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013

Editorial cartoon by Glenn McCoy — Jan. 30., 2013

Editorial cartoon by Glenn McCoy.

Editorial cartoon for The Citizen by Glenn McCoy for Jan. 30, 2013.

What you don’t know about militias

Ben Nelms's picture

There is a lot of talk today about reviving the idea from a few decades ago to ban some of the guns held by U.S. citizens. Remember those days in the ’70s and ’80s? Gun control became a hot-button political topic, complete with rants from the left and accompanying news stories from their faithful minions in the media. But the push withered away. A few decades later, it’s back. Read More»

13 years later, another Christmas

Cal Beverly's picture

The opinion reprinted below first appeared in The Citizen Christmas week, 1999.

In the year of our Lord 19 hundred and 99 ...

Many cultural commentators argue that the United States has entered the post-Christian era, and many applaud that transition as a desirable change in an increasingly multicultural society with diverse religious viewpoints. Read More»