Columnists

Tax-cut time

William Murchison's picture

It’s jobs, jobs, jobs now for the Obama team, rather than healthcare, healthcare, healthcare. You have to call it progress, particularly if you’re jobless, or fearful of becoming so at a time when 17 million Americans are either non- or underemployed.

We’re about done, in other words, with the free-floating pretense that putting the federal government in charge of healthcare decisions somehow creates a lot of opportunity and employment. Read More»

Standing on the shoulders of giants

Rick Ryckeley's picture

The 6-year-old boy looked up with eyes full of admiration at the giant of a man and said, “When I grow up, I want to be just like you, Dad.”

The father smiled and lifted his son up. Little arms and legs wrapped around and clung. The two exchanged one of the precious moments in life that words would only cheapen. The father closed his eyes and wished, “No, son, don’t be like me. Be better. Learn from my mistakes.” The son climbed higher and stood on his father’s shoulders to watch the parade. Read More»

Personhood

Cal Thomas's picture

Among the interesting arguments in last week’s 5-4 Supreme Court decision granting corporations First Amendment protections when making campaign contributions was the majority’s decision to effectively treat corporations as persons.

Liberal Washington Post columnist Ruth Marcus, who disagrees with the ruling, wrote, “... the majority acted as if there could be no constitutional distinction between a corporation and a human being.” Read More»

We need diversity

Walter Williams's picture

It’s not at all uncommon to watch a college basketball game and see that 90 to 100 percent of the players are black. According to the University of Central Florida’s Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport report titled “The 2008 Racial and Gender Report Card,” the percentage of black male basketball players in Division I was an all-time high at 60.4 percent. It was 45.9 percent in football and 6.0 percent in baseball. Read More»

The Healthy Triad

Greg Moffatt's picture

The first month of the year is not yet up, but I'm guessing that many of your New Year's resolutions are already history. There isn't anything wrong with making resolutions and there isn't anything wrong with adjusting or abandoning them. Sometimes those goals are unrealistic or just plain wrong for you. Read More»

Dealing with Samuel’s Autism

Readers’ response to how our daughter Jean’s working with her mildly autistic son Samuel has been gratifying indeed, and makes me believe that there are lots of other first-time mothers and grandmas holding each others’ – and their children’s – hands as they navigate the treacherous waters of the childhood years together. Read More»

Some bold tax suggestions for legislators

Claude Paquin's picture

It is well known that the Constitution of the state of Georgia requires the legislature to adopt a balanced budget. A balanced budget is one where the projected revenues and the projected expenses are practically equal.

It is also well known that the current tax structure of the state is producing declining revenues. So what can we do?

We have three choices: (1) reduce the expenses so they match the revenue, (3) increase the revenue so it matches the expenses, (3) do a bit of both so the numbers meet somewhere in the middle. Read More»

Officials should encourage input

Steve Brown's picture

I was in attendance for the Jan. 21 Peachtree City Council meeting and was thoroughly pleased. It appears the new group manning the helm is quite capable of piloting our ship.

My main reason for attending was the approval of a new management contract between the city and the Peachtree City Dog Park Association. The contract was approved and 100 percent of the fees collected will go toward operating and maintaining the dog park. Read More»

Peachtree City Girls Softball League honors a soldier

Terry Garlock's picture

Kailani Serapion is a 9-year-old softball player, and a fourth-grader this year at Huddleston Elementary. Her softball experience is a good example of what the Peachtree City Girls Softball League strives for, and the dad she misses a lot is a key part of our league.

Kailani’s dad, Guy Serapion, is a teacher. He is also a U.S. Army National Guard Infantry staff sergeant deployed to Afghanistan since last April, working in the city of Gardez where he is engaged as an advisor to the Afghan National Police Force, which also serves as their military. Read More»

If you can’t tell a story, then just be quiet . . .

Ronda Rich's picture

There is a friend I have who cannot, for the life of her, tell a story.

Sadly, she thinks she can.

This often leads to drawn out phone conversations, dinners and afternoons over coffee that can be nothing less than a yawning bore.

First, she has very little sense of humor. At least when she’s the one doing the talking. Now, she laughs merrily at others and often at my witticisms, proving she knows a good punch line when she hears it. She just can’t conjure up one of her own. Read More»

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