Columnists

Fayette ranks high among Georgia schools — but we can do better

Dr. Kevin Demmitt's picture

If you ask a family that has relocated to Fayette County why they chose to live here, one of the answers will likely be the quality of the school system. The school system was one of the reasons my wife and I chose to live here when we were house hunting. My children attended Fayette County schools from elementary through high school. All three are now in college or graduated.

I appreciate the many skilled teachers who invested in them and helped develop their talents and abilities to prepare them for the next level of education. That is one of the best measures of a good school system. Read More»

English is Georgia’s official language; guess who’s breaking the law?

Claude Paquin's picture

Should English be the official language in Georgia?

Personally, I would think so. But obviously thousands and thousands of our best educated people in Georgia disagree.

It seems that every ten years or so our Georgia legislature gets excited about this. In 1986, our legislature adopted a resolution making English the official state language.

Thinking that was not enough, in 1996 our Georgia General Assembly enacted a statute (code section 50-3-100) designating English as our official language and requiring its use in governmental documents and records. Read More»

Remembering a Georgia star whose greatness was cut too short

Loran Smith's picture

When we watch SportsCenter, the stars on our high-definition screens, more often than not, are young men in their twenties — in some cases thirties, and in rare cases their forties.

Old for an athlete can often be 35 years of age. Quarterbacks may last beyond 40. Kickers, the graybeards of football, for obvious reasons, last longer. Wizened, crafty pitchers sometimes hang around longer than others. Golfers have the best chance to win after their 40th birthday. Read More»

Life always evens out

Ronda Rich's picture

Among the many things I have learned in this life is how everything evens out, how those who are mighty and rich can become lowly and poor while the lowly and poor can become mighty and rich.

I have seen many examples of both, which often reminds of the truths taught to me by my parents.

“Don’t get above your raisin’,” they intoned often, meaning simply to stay true to who I was, what I was and from where I came. Read More»

See you on the road

David Epps's picture

Prior to a week and a half ago, I had never ridden a motorcycle in my life. Well, that’s not totally true. When I was 15, I took off on a friend’s bike and made it about 30 feet before I crashed. I bear the scar on my right shin to this day.

When my parents, who were adamantly opposed to motorcycles, saw the cut on my leg and inquired as to what happened, I told them that my wall locker at school was stuck and, when I jerked it open, the door hit my leg with such force that it gashed it. They bought it — I think. Read More»

Rules of life

Rick Ryckeley's picture

There are rules of life everyone must learn — the easy way or the hard way. Looking back, I’ve learned most of them the hard way. I’m not proud of that fact, but a fact it still remains. Some of the most important rules of life I learned while residing at 110 Flamingo Street. Read More»

Never forget the sacrifices made for you

Terry Garlock's picture

Last week Timothy Parker wrote that we do not spend sufficient time honoring our parents and grandparents for their sacrifice in WWII when they saved the world. I couldn’t agree more.

Maybe Mr. Parker, who wrote of his father’s WWII service, won’t mind my piggybacking to write about my father, also a Navy man.

Dad was a Navy corpsman on an aircraft carrier in the Pacific. That’s all I knew growing up because Dad was a simple man, not a blabbermouth like me, and he didn’t talk about it. Read More»

Obama’s Cronkite moment?

Cal Thomas's picture

President Obama may have experienced his Walter Cronkite moment over the economy.

Responding to Cronkite’s reporting from Vietnam four decades ago that the only way to end the war was by negotiating with the North Vietnamese, President Lyndon Johnson was reported (though never confirmed) to have said, “If I’ve lost Cronkite, I’ve lost Middle America.” Read More»

Putting nuclear energy in the right light for solving our energy crisis

Benita Dodd's picture

Support for nuclear energy has increased steadily since Gallup began polling Americans in 1994 on the issue. Then, 57 percent supported using nuclear power to generate electricity. This year, it was 62 percent. Even as support inches forward, however, innovation is at risk of being crushed under the heel of the vocal minority.

Electricity demands are expected to increase 27 percent by 2030 in the Southeast, where bountiful but unpopular fossil fuels generate much of the energy. Georgia’s energy generation, half of which is coal-powered, is the cleanest it has ever been. Read More»

The ‘equality’ conundrum of gay ‘marriage’: Where judgment begins

Debbie Thurman's picture

You know about the brouhaha, right? Seven million Californians voted to uphold the ages-old view that marriage is between one man and one woman and enshrined it into their state’s constitution. With one judicial stroke, a federal judge nullified their will. It’s becoming a common theme. Read More»

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