Columnists

Some perspective on our flawed Founding Fathers

Terry Garlock's picture

Michelle Bachman, candidate for the Republican presidential nomination, recently caused a stir when she said publicly that the Founding Fathers had worked tirelessly to end slavery.

We often hear about our Founding Fathers in a way that implies purity and virtue, inviting the vision of an angelic choir for background music. But we don’t often hear about the messy process, the infighting, factions, jealousies, suspicions, one group plotting against the other, or compromised principles like setting aside objections to slavery. Read More»

New York’s marriage scam

William Murchison's picture

Marriage in New York State, by act of its legislature, and in spite of everything you’ve always heard, is for everybody, and every combination of everybodies.

Except, you know what — it’s not. And, what’s more, won’t ever be.

For all the legislature’s grandeur and power, and the fervent encouragement of The New York Times, no aggregation of human beings enjoys the power to redefine marriage. Read More»

When love goes bad

Ronda Rich's picture

There wasn’t very much of me back then. I was a tiny girl, just big enough to reach up and grab hold of the wooden counter top in that old country store and lift my chin enough to allow my eyes to peer up in quiet fascination at the man who rang up the items that Mama had laid down.

Though there wasn’t a lot I knew at 6 years old, this much I did know: The man ringing up the groceries was handsome with an easy smile. He patted my head and winked and I suppose it was my first fleeting brush with a crush. Read More»

Watermelon rules

Rick Ryckeley's picture

Sometimes in life those things touted as advancements really aren’t: Betamax VCRs, 3-D movies, and all the so-called “improvements” in watermelons over the past 40 years.
On this Independence Day, it’s only fitting that the defenseless watermelon is finally given its independence — independence from any and all tampering. And it’s important that the youth of today be instructed in the rules. Yes, dear reader, the giant sweet melon has rules. Read More»

Remembering Ronnie

David Epps's picture

I was ready to take down my flags.

On Sept. 11, 2001, following the attacks on America by Islamic terrorists, I put two flags on my front porch, an American flag and a flag of the United States Marine Corps. I vowed that the flags would fly until those responsible had been brought to justice. Read More»

For July 4th, ‘Confirm thy soul in self-control’

Dr. Paul Kengor's picture

I encourage you to set aside the burgers and dogs and soda and beer for a moment this Fourth of July and contemplate something decidedly different, maybe even as you gaze upward at the flash of fireworks. Here it is: Confirm thy soul in self-control.

What do I mean by that? Let me explain.

The founders of this remarkable republic often thought and wrote about the practice of virtue generally and self-control specifically, two things long lost in this modern American culture of self. Read More»

July 4th: The Constitution vs. Progressives

Thomas Sowell's picture

The Fourth of July may be just a holiday for fireworks to some people. But it was a momentous day for the history of this country and the history of the world.

Not only did July 4, 1776 mark American independence from England, it marked a radically different kind of government from the governments that prevailed around the world at the time — and the kinds of governments that had prevailed for thousands of years before. Read More»

A Big Media suicide pact?

Cal Thomas's picture

Is there a profit-making business — other than TV networks and The New York Times — that so disrespects its audience it works overtime to offend them?

What other business metaphorically flips the bird to those who don’t subscribe to their social, cultural and political worldview? That is precisely what big media does to a large number of potential viewers and subscribers. Read More»

Why are things so hard?

Ronda Rich's picture

It is one of the great mysteries of life. Why are some things so hard? Why, if some things are meant to be, is it so difficult sometimes to make them happen?

A friend asked me that the other day. Then I, in turn, asked another friend. “Why are some things so hard to overcome? If they’re really meant to be, why would they be so difficult?”

She knew no better than I. She responded, “I don’t know. Some things are just harder to make happen.” Read More»

They're here!

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

Company’s here.

I don’t know about you, but the news that someone will be visiting sends me into a frenzy every time. Whether a virtual drive-by or for a long sojourn, my friends are, of course, most welcome, but I suddenly spot festooning cobwebs, pollen dust, leaf litter, tired wallpaper, and assorted other distractions, and I don’t know where to start.

Breakfast over and cleaned up, and company coming in a few days, thoughts are ricocheting in my head, “Where to begin?” and “What’s really important?” and “I have plenty of time yet.” Read More»

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