Columnists

The gift of a good book

Michael Boylan's picture

I ran into my creative writing teacher from high school, Mrs. Horton, at Omega Books a while back. She remembered me, which was nice, especially since I was only at McIntosh for six months before graduating, and said she saw my writing in the paper over the years. I told her I kept in touch (on Facebook) with other members from our class and from Voices (the school’s literary magazine). It was good to catch up with her.

Mrs. Horton, ahead of me in line, had an armful of books. I spotted John Irving’s “A Prayer for Owen Meany” in the pile and winced and groaned. Read More»

30 years of tradition

David Epps's picture

It is a rare occurrence when diverse churches gather to worship together and to do something meaningful. It is rarer still when diverse churches gather to worship and do something meaningful for 30 years in a row. Yet, on Good Friday in Peachtree City, that is exactly what will happen.

Thirty years ago, several pastors met regularly for breakfast and, eventually, one of them had the idea to do a joint Community Good Friday Service that would focus not on denominational distinctives but on their common salvation in Jesus Christ. Read More»

Spring cleaning

Rick Ryckeley's picture

For two people who think so much alike, sometimes The Wife and I don’t always define things the same way. Last weekend was a good example.
First thing Saturday morning I was drafted into the annual ritual of spring cleaning. For me spring cleaning is just moving around the dirt on the windows for an hour or so and then finding some sports to watch on the big TV. For The Wife spring cleaning means something totally different: open the cabinets, throw everything out – mostly my stuff — then buy new stuff. Read More»

A life lesson from our elders

Cal Thomas's picture

ARCHBOLD, Ohio — Here in Middle America, where farmland extends to the horizon, I pass an inspirational yard sign: “Self-Control: Having a Life Purpose Bigger Than Self.”

It’s a message our representatives in Washington would do well to learn, especially after months of raucous partisan bickering that nearly culminated in another “government shutdown.” Read More»

Ingenious Mama

Ronda Rich's picture

Mama wasn’t sentimental. In fact, I never knew of anyone who grew up in the Southern mountains during the Depression who was sentimental. They all said they were trying to forget, not remember.

So, as I continued to unpack Mama’s belongings after the disaster of a winter’s broken water line that destroyed her former home that is now my office, I didn’t expect much sentimentality. I, however, am extraordinarily sentimental. When the contractor pulled down a medicine chest in the bathroom to reveal ancient, pretty wallpaper, I pulled off pieces to save. Read More»

Money can’t buy prosperity

Dr. Shawn Ritenour's picture

Defenders of the Federal Reserve have been out in force recently declaring the triumph of Money Printing 2, James Grant’s suggested more truthful term for “quantitative easing.”

Some pundits point to an 18-percent increase in the S&P 500 since last August, when the Fed’s policy was announced. They also laud a significant increase in inflation expectations. Nominal GDP is on the rise again and official unemployment is lower.

All of these are seen as positive economic signs, indicating that Fed policy is working. Don’t believe it. Read More»

Masters brings back memories of past champions

Loran Smith's picture

AUGUSTA – Last week was one for reminiscing about milestone victories — principally, Jack Nicklaus winning his sixth Green Jacket here in 1986 and Gary Player becoming the first international winner fifty years ago.

In the last 25 years — since Nicklaus won his 18th major — all Masters, except 1997 when Tiger Woods won by 12 strokes over Tom Kite (270 to 282), have been decided by five strokes or fewer. There have been eight playoffs during this time, and more often than not only one or two strokes separated the competitors who finished first and second. Read More»

Confessions of a television addict

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

Now at the age when many parents deny they watch TV, Dave and I can look down our noses at TV fans who set their personal lives’ agenda to correspond with a favorite show. We watch very little TV, we repeat, smugly.

We were married so long ago that television had not yet scrambled high enough to throw a clear signal across the Pennsylvania hills and valleys in which we lived. If you could just make out that the shadow on the screen was the hero and the one on the left the villain, and as long as you could hear the dialogue, why, that was enough to follow the plot and marvel. Read More»

Some roads shouldn't be taken

Rick Ryckeley's picture

The light changed to green, and a decision had to be made. Straight ahead was the business meeting for which I was an hour early. To the left was a much different destination, a trip down memory lane. It was to be a lane filled with potholes, dangerous curves, and what might be a cliff at the end.

I turned left and pointed the nose of the car down Mt. Olive Street and towards the elementary school that bore its name. It had been a long time since I’d travelled this way, even longer still since I walked those pathways. Read More»

Obama's 'flip-flops'?

David Epps's picture

President Barack Obama has come under fire in recent days both from the political Left and from the Right for “flip-flopping” on campaign promises.

Among the so-called flip-flops are the following:

• Candidate Obama promised to close Gitmo (Guantanamo Bay, Cuba) while President Obama has kept it open.

• Candidate Obama said he would repeal the “Bush tax cuts” while President Obama has left them in place.

• Candidate Obama supported the healthcare single-payer mandate while President Obama compromised and dropped it from his healthcare proposal. Read More»

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