Columnists

Homemade Apple Pepper Pie

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

How do you think we get new recipes?

Many of us use the recipe for another reader’s great-grandmother’s special chili sauce when she sent it to a magazine competition.

Or Grandpa’s Norwegian Christmas grog that the children should not be offered. Or we have a family classic recipe of renown simply because of a misprint in the directions.

When these became family kitchen secrets they may owe to the fact that they contain a drop of spirits that no one wants to admit. Besides, that just adds to the mystique. Read More»

Good intentions and the law

Cal Beverly's picture

UPDATED OPINION — I filed an Open Records request to Peachtree City Monday afternoon of this week, asking them to produce for inspection all records and documents related to something called “Project Z.” Read More»

Blinded by the light

Rick Ryckeley's picture

It started out as a typical day. The Wife reminded me of something I’d forgotten. Leaving for work, she gave me a hug and said, “Eye doctor’s appointment is at 10 today.” I must’ve had a funny look because then she kissed me and added, “You’ve already forgotten, haven’t you?”

I do that quite often: look funny and forget things. Some say that’s a result of getting older. I think it’s just a result of my forgetting things and, of course, me looking funny. Read More»

The first victim of 9/11

David Epps's picture

Robert Emmett Judge was killed on Sept. 11, 2001. The son of Irish Catholic immigrants, Judge was one of a pair of fraternal twins. He grew up in Brooklyn, N.Y., during the great depression and developed, at an early age, a love for the poor, often giving his last quarter to beggars on the street.

Judge’s father died of a slow and painful illness when the boy was 6 and Judge worked to shine shoes to earn money for the family. At the age of 15, he entered a formation process to become a Franciscan. Read More»

History is clear: Its the spending, stupid

Dr. Paul Kengor's picture

We have failed to heed the lessons of economic history, with terrible consequences for our economy and country. And the most crucial of those lessons, particularly since the start of LBJs Great Society, is this: deficits have been caused not by a lack of income-tax increases but by recession and, most of all, by excessive government spending. Read More»

The tide and Marco Rubio

Cal Thomas's picture

In my high school days before sex and environmental education and the general dumbing down of the population, memorization of some Shakespeare was expected in Miss Kauffmans 12th-grade English class. A favorite I still recall is this line spoken by Brutus in Julius Caesar: There is a tide in the affairs of men, which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune; omitted, all the voyage of their life is bound in shallows and in miseries ... Read More»

Actual figures show futility of predicting hurricanes

Dr. Harold Brown's picture

In an affluent country, government can afford to do many unnecessary things, and do them in complex and impressive ways. One example in the United States is the predilection for predicting the number of hurricanes in the upcoming season.

Every spring comes a reminder to prepare for the hurricane season starting in June. Predicting the number of hurricanes for the year is supposed to help. Read More»

DoD must be reorganized for today’s wars

Dr. Earl Tilford's picture

In 1914, on the eve of the Great War, the Duke of Cambridge wrote, There is a time for all things. There is even a time for change; and that is when it can no longer be avoided.

Speaking of change, the current debt crisis could force drastic cuts in the Department of Defense budget, perhaps as high as 50 percent.

In the immediate post-Cold War era, DoD futurists envisioned a 25-year period of strategic pause before the nation faced a major peer competitor sometime between 2015 and 2020. Read More»

Gary was my friend

Ronda Rich's picture

It started one Sunday when I slid into the third row pew next to a slender man with rumbled silver hair just as the first notes of the organ announced that service was starting.

He wore a blue polyester sports jacket, plaid knit slacks, a crumbled shirt and an incredibly wide tie. He nodded and I smiled, as I noticed that one of his clear blue eyes drew inward toward his nose. A moment later, he reached into his jacket pocket, pulled out a piece of hard caramel candy and, unsmiling, handed it to me. Read More»

Company gone

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

This is the column intended to wrap up our summer travelogue, complaining gently about six loads of wash, mostly bedding, finally finished and folded. Dave’s such a good fellow, did his best to take up some of the inevitable burden. Because of the heat, we did not spend a lot of time outdoors when we could get almost the same experience within.

And we (or the young people) did a lot in those three weeks, in no particular order:

· Big beach and little breakers on each side of the Florida peninsula

· Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge

· Church Read More»

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