Columnists

Bug eating

Rick Ryckeley's picture

The Wife ran to the kitchen yesterday morning. No it wasn’t for another cup of coffee. She was running to get me. Excitedly, she said, “You’ve got to see this; we have a bat on our front porch!”

“What’s he doing?” I answered.

“Well right now, he’s just hanging out.” Funny Wife I have. She showed me the little brown bat about two inches long, which had taken up residence under the cover of our front porch roof. I found this to also be some exciting news: finally something desirable has moved into our neighborhood. Read More»

I am a D.D.

David Epps's picture

“There once was a minister named Tweedle
Who refused an honorary degree.
‘Twas bad enough being Tweedle, he said,
Without being Tweedle, D.D.’”

The “D.D.” in the little rhyme stands for “Doctor of Divinity” which, in nearly every case, is an honorary degree granted to clergy or theologians, not an academically earned degree. A few weeks ago, I became the holder of the degree of “D.D.” Read More»

Louis Zamperini and Memorial Day

Cal Thomas's picture

Perhaps you’ve heard of him, perhaps not. Louis Zamperini has had fame, lost it and seen it restored more than once. That happens when you are 94 years old and must be re-introduced to succeeding generations.

Zamperini was a juvenile delinquent, then an Olympic distance runner who competed in the 1936 Olympics in Berlin, Germany (he met Adolf Hitler and his chief propagandist, Joseph Goebbels), then an Army Air Corps enlistee. Read More»

Practical folks

Ronda Rich's picture

Southerners tend to be practical folks, at least those of us raised in rural areas that have seen their share of hard times. Read More»

From Madison to Joplin

Dr. Marvin Folkertsma's picture

Madison, Wisconsin’s winter follies relinquished their national attention to Tuscaloosa’s tornado in April, events along the Mississippi in May, and finally to the most recent twister in Joplin, Missouri, where genuine suffering puts into perspective tenured teachers who are learning that they must actually pay a fraction of their healthcare costs. Read More»

USDA is mostly about giveaways, not agriculture

Dr. Harold Brown's picture

How does the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) budget grow in proportion to the shrinkage of its mission? Perhaps it is a reward for agriculture’s phenomenal success. Its increased efficiency is one of the miracles of the 20th century. Or, just maybe, the USDA’s budget grows with its emphasis on missions far removed from assisting U.S. agriculture. Read More»

The changing images of heaven and hell in the American consciousness

Dr. Gary Scott Smith's picture

Heaven and hell are in the news and on Americans’ minds a lot lately.

“Heaven Is for Real: A Little Boy’s Astounding Story of His Trip to Heaven and Back” is currently number one on The New York Times Best Seller List for nonfiction. It details a 4-year-old’s near-death experience as told to his pastor father.

“The Boy Who Came Back from Heaven: A Remarkable Account of Miracles, Angels, and Life beyond This World” describes the similar experiences of a 6-year-old after he awoke from a two-month coma caused by a car accident. Read More»

Healthcare reform: Treat disease, not symptoms

Dr. Brian E. Hill's picture

If physicians treated symptoms, they would never cure. Prescribing a cough suppressant to a patient with an intractable cough without searching for an underlying cause, for example, is obviously foolhardy. If cancer were present, it would inevitably progress and take that patient’s life. Cure comes through recognizing symptoms and parsing them to diagnose and treat disease. Problem-solving in health policy should employ the same approach. Read More»

Walking sticks

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

Some years ago, I wrote about our late former mayor Howard Morgan leaning on a cane when he came to vote at the precinct where I worked.

It was not a cane, he informed me, but a walking stick. He’d had some health problems and all he needed was another leg, so to speak, to form a steadying tripod on the ground.

As we greeted each other and he came closer, I noticed that this was not an ordinary stick. When I admired it, he handed it to me to examine while he went about the business of a democratic government. Read More»

Brain vs. Mouth

Rick Ryckeley's picture

There are some things in this world of which I really don’t understand. Why, whatever the age, children don’t listen to the more mature, wiser, parents. Why lessons always have to be learned the hard way. Can’t sometimes they be learned the easy way? And why everything that taste really good is full of calories and isn’t good for you.

These are truly important questions that have bewildered me for years. But what tops my list of befuddlement? In the epic battle between brains vs. mouth, why does mouth always win? I have listed but a few of my classic gaffs to illustrate the point. Read More»