Columnists

Planners’ transit menu ignores tastes of commuters

Benita Dodd's picture

Imagine serving Brussels sprouts instead of broccoli casserole at Christmas dinner. You know most guests won’t eat them, but you believe they’ll bring balance to the meal and that guests will like them if only they taste them. That is the “build-it-they-will-come” mentality behind the project list for the July 31, 2012, penny transportation sales tax referendum in the Atlanta region. Read More»

Obama’s Kansas speech: The rebuttal

Dick Morris's picture

On Tuesday last week, President Obama went to a small town in Kansas to lay out his basic campaign theme for the coming election: a commitment to “fairness.”

In Obama’s America, we all are dependent on the government, closely regulated, heavily taxed ... and poor. He boldly proclaims that rugged individualism doesn’t work and neither do tax cuts.

Instead, government management of the economy, heavy subsidies and universal welfare is the key to economic health. Read More»

Trying to find some kindness

Ronda Rich's picture

Larry, an aspiring writer, wrote me the other day and asked if I would read a synopsis of a book he is working to complete. Like me, he writes of Southern people, especially those who rise up from the crooks and hollows of the mountains.

Though it troubled me to do so, I had to respond that I don’t read the unpublished work of other writers. There are two important reasons for that. First, I fear that I could swallow something sub-consciously and then regurgitate it as my own words. Now, I’d never do that intentionally. I’m boringly ethical. But it could happen by mistake. Read More»

Kindness not random

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

The “little, nameless, unremembered acts of kindness and of love” that make up “the best portion of a good man’s life,” as William Wordsworth called them, ought not remain “unremembered.”

A Nineties term – “random acts of kindness” – was coined as a sort of antidote, I suppose, to the horrors we see each day on the evening news. It suggests the importance of responding instinctively to the impulse to do right. Read More»

A really fair deal

Rick Ryckeley's picture

Most of my childhood memories from growing up at 110 Flamingo Street are pleasant and still warm and fuzzy in my mind. This story, however, ain’t one of them.
Nope, this story is about blisters, pain, and life lessons learned the hard way. Funny, it seems life lessons are never learned the easy way. Looking back, I guess there are many techniques Dad could’ve employed to teach me. But “split and stack,” to this day, I’ve not forgotten. And how could I? I still wear the scars. Read More»

A morning at Evans Middle School

David Epps's picture

I was on my way to Evans Middle School the morning before Veterans Day. Several days earlier Debbie, the mother of my grandson Sam Epps, an 8th grader, called to say that Sam would like to invite me to attend Evans’ Veteran’s Day observance. I readily agreed. I had never been to such an event so I was a bit curious as to what would take place.

I arrived at Evans about 20 minutes prior to the start of the program. As I approached the gym, where the event was to be held, a young lady, whom I assumed to be a teacher, asked if I was a veteran.

“I am,” I replied. Read More»

A December to remember

Cal Thomas's picture

Seventy years ago this month, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and brought America into a war that had begun in Europe in 1939.

In his masterful new book “December 1941: 31 Days That Changed America and Saved the World,” Craig Shirley takes readers back to a very different America. Through hundreds of stories and advertisements culled from newspapers, Shirley not only transports us back to that tumultuous time, but reminds this generation that denial about an enemy’s intentions can have grave consequences. Read More»

Losing out to an ugly woman

Ronda Rich's picture

Perhaps it isn’t a great mystery of life but it’s certainly one of life’s more intriguing questions. At least for us women, that is.

Think about this: Is it easier on your self-esteem to lose a guy to an ugly woman or a beautiful one? Having lost guys in every way possible, I should be able to answer this. After all, I have lost out to beautiful women and once I was jilted in favor of a girl so ugly that even my own father mocked me. Read More»

Nighty-night

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

This might be the best Christmas gift you receive this year.

Then again, it might look like a scam. Can’t be, because there is no money or response attached to it in any way. Nor drugs or breathing aids.

The usual disclaimer: I’m not a doctor and cannot offer any guarantees about what I am going to prescribe for you. All I know is it works for me and it might for you, too. Read More»

Visiting with Verne Lundquist

Loran Smith's picture

NEW YORK – Verne Lundquist has been around, but the changing of landscapes — owing to the changing of addresses by his father, a Lutheran minister, and his work as a national network broadcaster — has not changed the likable announcer.

A genial sort, Verne ranks his many and varied friends as important as the memorable games and events he has covered during his versatile career. He has a remarkable recall of places and people, ever the raconteur with a penchant for good humor. Read More»