Columnists

Is it the end of ‘the Right Stuff’?

Cal Thomas's picture

When Atlantis lifted off on its final mission scheduled for Friday, it brought to an end an era of space exploration that began for the U.S. with the Soviet launch of the unmanned satellite “Sputnik 1” in 1957 and the first man to fly in space, Russia’s Yuri Gagarin, on April 12, 1961.

Alan Shepard followed Gagarin into space on May 5, 1961, becoming the second person, and the first American, to fly in space and under John F. Kennedy’s vision and with resolve and resources, the U.S. reached his stated goal of “landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to Earth” on July 20, 1969. Read More»

Sexiness of gun metal

Ronda Rich's picture

Just when I thought I knew most of what there was to know, or at least that which was mostly worth knowing, about what is alluring to men about women, I uncovered a stunning new truth.

I believe that I can now say that it is neither sleek high heels nor lace-trimmed lingerie that tantalizes them most. It is definitely not figure-defining dresses, the perfect shade of lip-gloss, long, glossy hair or lashes that are curled and tinted. It is something that is bolder, more smoldering, more dangerous. Read More»

Forgotten stars

Thomas Sowell's picture

Three recent sports biographies — two about baseball stars Stan Musial and Hank Greenberg, and another about boxing great Joe Louis — are not only interesting in themselves, but also recall an era that now seems as irretrievably past as the Roman Empire.

They also raise questions about who is remembered and why. Read More»

Double dog dare ya

Rick Ryckeley's picture

Something had gone horribly wrong. Blood was everywhere, Twin Brother Mark lay in a crumpled mass at the bottom of hill, and Mom was frantic. From the wail of the sirens, the ambulance was once again closing in on 110 Flamingo Street. This would be the third time in less than a month emergency medical crews had descended upon our backyard for a mishap, but it was by far the worst. Read More»

Casey Anthony and O.J. Simpson

David Epps's picture

The two most publicized and notorious criminal trials in recent years are the murder trials of O.J. Simpson and Casey Anthony. Both trials captured the attention of the media and the public and both trials resulted in the acquittal of the defendants on murder charges. Both trials also resulted in the vast majority of the American public believing that the defendants “got away with murder.” Read More»

Boys will be boys

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

They are not babies anymore. They are forces to be wary of.

For the past several weeks we’ve been looking at the house through grandchildren’s eyes, or trying to, to anticipate what they may target. Ours is the quintessential grandparents’ home, with bright magazines, keepsakes, figurines, telephones and assorted electronics. Weeks ago, their mother had already pronounced most of it hazardous to their health, not to mention ours, and I need to put them out of reach. Read More»

Some perspective on our flawed Founding Fathers

Terry Garlock's picture

Michelle Bachman, candidate for the Republican presidential nomination, recently caused a stir when she said publicly that the Founding Fathers had worked tirelessly to end slavery.

We often hear about our Founding Fathers in a way that implies purity and virtue, inviting the vision of an angelic choir for background music. But we don’t often hear about the messy process, the infighting, factions, jealousies, suspicions, one group plotting against the other, or compromised principles like setting aside objections to slavery. Read More»

New York’s marriage scam

William Murchison's picture

Marriage in New York State, by act of its legislature, and in spite of everything you’ve always heard, is for everybody, and every combination of everybodies.

Except, you know what — it’s not. And, what’s more, won’t ever be.

For all the legislature’s grandeur and power, and the fervent encouragement of The New York Times, no aggregation of human beings enjoys the power to redefine marriage. Read More»

When love goes bad

Ronda Rich's picture

There wasn’t very much of me back then. I was a tiny girl, just big enough to reach up and grab hold of the wooden counter top in that old country store and lift my chin enough to allow my eyes to peer up in quiet fascination at the man who rang up the items that Mama had laid down.

Though there wasn’t a lot I knew at 6 years old, this much I did know: The man ringing up the groceries was handsome with an easy smile. He patted my head and winked and I suppose it was my first fleeting brush with a crush. Read More»

Watermelon rules

Rick Ryckeley's picture

Sometimes in life those things touted as advancements really aren’t: Betamax VCRs, 3-D movies, and all the so-called “improvements” in watermelons over the past 40 years.
On this Independence Day, it’s only fitting that the defenseless watermelon is finally given its independence — independence from any and all tampering. And it’s important that the youth of today be instructed in the rules. Yes, dear reader, the giant sweet melon has rules. Read More»

Recent Comments