Columnists

Honeybees, houses and such

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

When I was about 8, we moved from city to country because life in the city was becoming crowded and unpleasant. Every morning we had to sweep the porch clear of soot from the coal-powered railroad two blocks away, and some days my mom couldn’t hang sheets or blankets out to air.

Both of my parents had country childhoods, and they wanted me and my younger brother to have the same memories, to cook their home-grown fruits and veggies, and to let us kids ride bikes on the little-trafficked asphalt roads. Read More»

Say hello to Mr. Wilson

Rick Ryckeley's picture

The Wife and I, we live in a small, quiet town. From our front door, it’s an easy walk to the heart of downtown and the old-fashioned coffee shop where we get breakfast and a hot wakeup drink.

There, we talk about everything and nothing, as we enjoy the ambiance and watch the townsfolk filter in. On Saturdays we spend more time than money weaving our way through the many eclectic antique shops which dot Main Street. Always a surprise and a treat are the homemade ice-cream and samples of chocolates from the corner mercantile. Read More»

Simple leadership essentials

David Epps's picture

There are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of books on leadership. While I make no claim to be an expert on the subject, I have had the opportunity to serve in various positions of leadership over the years.

To those who aspire to be leaders, I submit the following as necessary essentials:

1. Understand and submit to authority. Authority is everywhere. It cannot be avoided. It cannot be ignored. Authority is present in the family, schools, places of employment, the church, the government, the military, society, and in nearly every organization. Read More»

The main event

Cal Thomas's picture

Next week, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear three days of oral arguments in the healthcare lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act, otherwise known as “Obamacare.” Read More»

Ga.’s transit dreams, transportation nightmares

Benita Dodd's picture

The headline on an article in The Onion satirical magazine in 2000 was, “Report: 98 Percent Of U.S. Commuters Favor Public Transportation For Others.”

Sometimes truth is even stranger than fiction. Fewer than four out of every 100 metro Atlanta workers rely on public transportation for their daily commutes, according to Census Bureau data.

Yet the priorities in proposals for congestion relief in metro Atlanta would lead any outsider to believe that the public is clamoring for more mass transit. Read More»

Ronda babysits

Ronda Rich's picture

If you ever hear that I have been babysitting, know this: It was an absolute act of desperation on the part of the mothers. It means there was no other option.

And it does occasionally happen.

As in the case of Nicole, who had a doctor’s appointment and called. “Are you up for a little babysitting? I won’t be gone long.”

“Gone long.” Key words here because that means “such an abbreviated time that even Ronda can handle it.” So, I agreed. Read More»

Alice

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

Someone stopped me recently on the cart path, confirmed that I was who she thought I was, and told me she enjoyed my work.

Then, hesitantly, she asked me about the monument in the city green area off Willowbend Road. She had noticed that the name on it was also Satterthwaite.

When I told her it was a memorial to our daughter Alice, she apologized for having brought up what she supposed was a painful subject.

It is not, of course, and I told her so. I’m always grateful for an opportunity to share memories of the sweet child who blessed our lives for 17 short years, so long ago. Read More»

The art of riding trees

Rick Ryckeley's picture

Growing up at 110 Flamingo Street for seven years, my three brothers, sister, and I had summers filled with adventures and misadventures.

The adventures were a lot more fun than misadventures, and a lot less painful. Some of these led to doctor visits, a few sent us to the hospital and some were downright too crazy to even to try once, much less continue to do for an entire summer.

Such was the art of riding trees. Read More»

No such thing as a former Marine

David Epps's picture

“A Marine is a Marine ... there’s no such thing as a former Marine. You’re a Marine, just in a different uniform and you’re in a different phase of your life. But you’ll always be a Marine because you went to Parris Island, San Diego or the hills of Quantico.” – Commandant of the Marine Corps, General James F. Amos

Anyone who doubts that statement only need visit the monthly meeting of the Clyde Thomason Detachment #1325 of the Marine Corps League that serves Coweta and Fayette counties. Read More»

A family’s gratitude

Terry Garlock's picture

I often read in this paper citizen criticism of Peachtree City’s police and fire organizations as being overstaffed, their budgets in need of a tighter trim. This is to offer a different perspective.

My 10-year-old daughter Kristen has an occasional seizure. On three occasions when she had a particularly bad episode, we called for the local ambulance and have been grateful for the response, even though a critic would ask why we also needed a fire truck and too many men in our living room while an EMT gave Kristen oxygen and checked her vital signs.
Read More»

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