Peachtree City

Council must be more proactive to save PTC

Lately, it has been apparent that Peachtree City no longer plans ahead. Instead we find ourselves reacting to whatever comes our way and trying to make it work.

What has happened?

What happened to the town that told everybody how it was going to be and as a result businesses felt privileged to build here? Now it seems like we are the ones that bow down to whatever is presented to us and we are constantly compromising.

Take the bowling “center” proposed for Ga. Highway 74 South across from Wilshire Estates and adjacent to Somerby senior living facility. Read More»

Why do commissioners keep secrets, vote with no explanations?

You get a funny feeling after reviewing some of the recent decisions by the Fayette County Board of Commissioners, and maybe a few questions.

There is a great deal of curiosity (suspicion?) regarding what Commissioner Lee Hearn, Commissioner Robert Horgan and Chairman Herb Frady are really up to lately.

Disbelief creeps in when you see the three commissioners spending $89,000 in tax dollars on paving a dead-end gravel road with two houses on it at the same time they claim there is no funding to do far more important projects. Read More»

Commissioners’ missteps have become table talk at Fayette restaurants

I am submitting some comments I made during the April 28 Board of Commissioners meeting:

Several events came together over the past few weeks that have brought me to write a letter to the editor. The culmination of these events came to a head last week over dinner with a group of friends at a local restaurant in Peachtree City.

Over the course of the evening our conversation turned to local politics. I started a discussion about county politics and the issues that were important to me, these being:

1. West Fayetteville Bypass

2. Mass transit to Fayette County Read More»

Future firefighters try out their equipment

Future firefighters try out their equipment

Peachtree City hosted the annual Touch a Truck event last week and children of all ages and their families got to tour a wide variety of vehicles. Photo/Michael Boylan.

History (and science) in the making

McIntosh High School sophomores Hannah Mason and Leslie Sellers

For the first time ever, students from Fayette County -- McIntosh High School sophomores Hannah Mason and Leslie Sellers -- competed in the International Sustainable World (Energy, Engineering, and Environment) Project Olympiad, also known as I-SWEEEP, a groundbreaking science fair open to high school students from around the world. I-SWEEEP was held May 4-9 in Houston Texas, with 70 countries and 43 states represented and 601 students and 440 projects competing. Read More»

Kedron teachers at the spring hoedown

Kedron teachers at the spring hoedown

Kedron teachers performed a Western Cha-Cha slide at the school Spring Hoe-Down. They entertained students and parents at the PTO sponsored event. From back to front are Sarah Lumpkin, Abbie Abel, Sue Keirns, Stacey Barnett, Principal, Mary Margaret Bivings, Vice-Principal, Vicki Rachels, Karen Thurston, Ann Reefe, Nancy Jackson, Delores Wright, Trish Roshelli, Sarah Christman, Teresa Drennan and Ginny Kopec. Photo/Special.

Face painting at Fayette's Relay for Life

Face painting at Fayette's Relay for Life

Senoia resident Sophie Lear (center front) got an unexpected treat April 29 at the Fayette County Relay for Life held this year at Falcon Field in Peachtree City when she and her family stopped in at a very colorful booth and walked away with a butterfly face painting. Photo/Ben Nelms.

PTC announces plans for 2011 Memorial Day observance

Last year’s golf cart procession is led into City Hall/Library Plaza by the Civil Air Patrol color guard as members of the Sons of the American Revolution welcome them. Photo/Special.

Roy Mooney is a man who understands the importance of remembering history; on Memorial Day in Peachtree City this year, Mooney will share history that he lived as one of the few remaining survivors of the Day of Infamy, Pearl Harbor.

“The longest day of my life was December 7, 1941,” Roy Mooney recalls vividly, remembering how he narrowly survived the Japanese sneak attack that officially drew America into WWII. Mooney, now well into his 80s, is one of only about 30 known Pearl Harbor survivors in Georgia and less than 3,000 nationwide. Read More»

Dumping old pills for the environment's sake

Dumping old pills for the environment's sake

Peachtree City Police Lt. Jason Epps (right) and a fellow officer and DEA agent were front and center April 30 as area residents arrived at Shakerag on McIntosh Trail to drop off out-of-date prescription and over-the-counter medications for the department’s “Pill Drop” program. Residents dropped off approximately 170 pounds of medications, the vast majority of which were old prescription meds. Officials then safely dispose of the medications in an environmentally friendly manner. Photo/Ben Nelms.