District voting: The big lie about Fayette

Terry Garlock's picture

On last Sunday’s edition of TV political talk show “The Georgia Gang,” when the agenda turned to the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision on the Voting Rights Act, black activist Jeff Dickerson was ready and eager.

To paraphrase Mr. Dickerson, “You want an example of why the Voting Rights Act should have been upheld? We don’t have to look any further than 30 miles south in Fayette County, where a federal judge recently imposed district voting because Fayette County has prevented blacks from being elected to the County Commission or the Board of Education there for ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY ONE YEARS! THAT is why we need the Voting Rights Act!”

Mr. Dickerson took the opportunity to repeat the 191 years line about six times, thereby setting the hook in any gullible viewers. But it is a lie and repetition will not make it true.

I can’t speak to what happened in Fayette County decades ago; I’ve only lived here 20 years. But I can say I have never seen anyone prevented from running for office by discriminatory practices.

Of course, Mr. Dickerson, and the judge, could have made their statements accurate with small adjustments, like, “For decades, black DEMOCRATS have been unsuccessful running for the County Commission or the BOE in Fayette County.”

That would at least have the virtue of being true, and I don’t know of any sensible or legal principle that would assure success to Democrat candidates in a Republican stronghold such as Fayette County.

Of course when the NAACP mobilizes in a case such as Fayette County, they never disclose their “D” card, that a black Republican elected official would not ease their pain because the complaint is more political than racial, something only black elected Democrats can assuage.

The great irony now is that, in pursuit of “fairness,” the court is overseeing a gerrymandering process of the ridiculous kind, creating a minority district that makes no geographic sense whatever as it winds in a sliver here and there searching desperately for enough black voters to meet the law’s proportion requirements of just over 50 percent black. What tangled webs we weave as we try to manufacture a perfect world.

The answer to all this silliness is of course simple. Treat everyone the same with no racial or other groups favored, let the voting chips fall where they will and prosecute any actual discrimination in the election process. A fifth-grader could figure this out.

We need to get our government out of the business of favoring one group over others. Fifty years ago there were reasons to do it, but a lot of things have changed for the better. While in my view it is clearly past time to end preferential treatment, there is something white folks like me need to keep in mind.

Last week, when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act because the data used to demonstrate the need to require Southern states to jump through extra hoops was too many decades out of date, black leaders nationwide gathered to bemoan the ruling, even though all the laws preventing discrimination in the election process remain in effect.

While black Americans link arms and sway as they sing, “We shall overcome!” I now have to wonder, “Overcome what?”

The only discrimination I see is the preferential treatment on their behalf that our government continues to impose. And then I realize the very thing that race hustlers like Jesse Jackson feed on — fear.

As a white man I can’t know the deep-seated fear in the hearts of many black Americans as the protective blanket of preferential treatment is slowly – ever so slowly – taken away, the fear founded on a long history of lousy treatment in America long ago, fear that without preferential treatment the old ways of Jim Crow might re-emerge.

I wish there were an effective way to convince them that generations of Americans of all stripes have now learned and internalized the notion that discrimination is wrong.

In fact, we white folks are rather weary of discrimination from preferential programs because instinctively we know it is wrong. We know it is long past time that we all treat each other equally with no preference to anyone. We know that a representative can do a good job of serving our interests no matter their gender or race. We know that race-based voting is fundamentally wrong, even in a new district drawn under the court’s aegis for precisely that purpose.

And in Fayette County, the way we Republicans should deal with the imposition of district voting is to find conservative black candidates in each district and strive to soundly defeat any Democrat candidates whether they are black, white, Asian (like my daughters), or any other race.

If we Republican voters prevent Democrats from being elected to the County Commission or the BOE for another hundred years, that is fair politics and it won’t be wrong no matter how loudly the NAACP may squeal.

[Terry Garlock of Peachtree City occasionally contributes a column to The Citizen. His email is terry@garlock1.com.]

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Mr. Garlock

Now I understand why you will not run for political office.

As I have stated before elections in a democracy have nothing to do with "fairness" or "equality", they have everything to do with power, more specifically the power to tax and redistribute wealth. We have a race based democracy and a special interest group based on race that seeks power.

That's it, don't get confused with shallow arguments concerning anything else, you're wasting your writing skills on this subject.

All men are created equal, some are more equal than others under current law. It will stay that way long after we depart this earth.

Peter Pfeifer
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Terry; add these lies about Fayette

Back during one of the previous attempts to force Fayette County to conform to a special few's ideas about how we should structure our local government, I found the following about Georgia counties. 113 counties were District, 16 were "combination" (Fayette was in this group), 22 were "at large" and 8 were "sole commissioner". Lengths of term varied, some were full time, most were part time.
The truth is that counties in Georgia have a variety of forms of government as desired by the citizens of each county. District Voting isn't the only "Constitutional" form of government.

Davids mom
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Mr. Garlock

Thank you for sharing your gift of writing.

This article brings out some excellent realities and a well thought–out expression of your opinion. As we have agreed on before, there may always be some viewpoints where we disagree. I would just like to share my opinion regarding some of your expressed thoughts.

Quote:

As a white man I can’t know the deep-seated fear in the hearts of many black Americans as the protective blanket of preferential treatment is slowly – ever so slowly – taken away, the fear founded on a long history of lousy treatment in America long ago, fear that without preferential treatment the old ways of Jim Crow might re-emerge

It’s because the ‘lousy treatment’ still exists unfortunately. This treatment is no longer legal – but is still practiced by a minority of our citizens. (Not just southern citizens) We have seen this attitude expressed in words by some participants in this forum.

Quote:

I wish there were an effective way to convince them that generations of Americans of all stripes have now learned and internalized the notion that discrimination is wrong

First – stop referring to ‘black’ people as ‘them’ and as if we all have the same ideology, purpose, attitude, opinion etc. Maybe convincing judges, civil rights organizations, etc. should be the goal of effective ‘convincing’.

Quote:

We know it is long past time that we all treat each other equally with no preference to anyone.

And this truism is still difficult for some black people as well as some white people to put into practice.

As long as there are people who express a negative attitude towards all black people or all ‘white’ people – there will be that fear. (of returning to Jim Crow, of living next door to a ‘black person’, being denied a job, loan, because of skin color. etc.). The ignorance of prejudice based on skin color still exists in 2013. You, as a white man with Asian children living in Fayette County and/ or Georgia in 2013 possibly have not witnessed preferential treatment of ‘whites’. However, unfortunately it still exists. As I listen to the conversation of the younger generation (grandchildren) I have hope. They base their friendships on kindred tastes. If they are in an integrated environment – those friendships are based on sports, entertainment, classes taken in school, etc. Some who have not experienced their families having persons of a different color in their homes may ask why. Their parents will have to deal with that situation. . .but I don’t think it will have that great an impact on their selection of friends unless their parents have a discriminating attitude based on skin color. To be discriminating based on character is, in my opinion, wise.

Quote:

In fact, we white folks are rather weary of discrimination from preferential programs because instinctively we know it is wrong. We know it is long past time that we all treat each other equally with no preference to anyone. We know that a representative can do a good job of serving our interests no matter their gender or race. We know that race-based voting is fundamentally wrong, even in a new district drawn under the court’s aegis for precisely that purpose

We white folks Do you now speak for all ‘white folks’? I wish you did – but my experience is different from yours. The ‘white folks’ that I associate with, my church members, my family members, my neighbors,would fit your description of treating others equally – but unfortunately there are others in my experience in 2013 who don’t.

Quote:

And in Fayette County, the way we Republicans should deal with the imposition of district voting is to find conservative black candidates in each district and strive to soundly defeat any Democrat candidates whether they are black, white, Asian (like my daughters), or any other race

In the judge’s eyes, the Republican Party in Fayette County has had almost 48 years to accomplish this. Maybe Districtwide voting kept the BOE and the County Commission ‘white’. That may not have been the purpose – but one has to look at 48 years of ‘outcome’.

Quote:

If we Republican voters prevent Democrats from being elected to the County Commission or the BOE for another hundred years, that is fair politics and it won’t be wrong no matter how loudly the NAACP may squeal.

Unfortunately, Fayette County will be watched because of the reputation that this county has throughout Georgia as the ‘last hold out of white supremacy’. I know there are ‘black’ Republicans in Fayette County. Most have a conservative ideology – but are wary of a perceived conservative ‘social’ ideology. To tell you the truth, no matter what Hermain Cain or Thomas Sowell share of the conservative ideology, what is perceived as ‘southern’ Republicanism is separatism. Why? Outcomes.

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Absurd

"last hold out of white supremacy."

Seriously? So tired of the race mongers.

Racism is strongest in those that can only be "fairly represented" by people of their same race. What a disgusting group of people.

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Liberals are Rushing to Judgment on Voting Rights Act Ruling

The Supreme Court’s recent ruling to weaken the Voting Rights Act has elicited near universal condemnation by liberal groups in general and African-Americans in particular. Lamentation for the Court’s decision invariably reviews a century of blatant racial discrimination promulgated by Caucasian conservative majorities in the South and elsewhere after the Civil War. Few argue that drastic measures were required to rectify these inequities in the 1960s and, although not perfect, President Johnson’s Voting Rights Act lifted major barriers to poll access for Americans of color.

Unfortunately, swinging the pendulum so starkly in the opposite direction has propagated the law of unintended consequences. Instead of bringing African-American needs into the mainstream of every district in a state, the law allowed gerrymandered voting districts that guarantee Black majorities who virtually always elect liberal, Black representatives. These African-American lawmakers essentially collude with their White counterparts to maintain secure positions in Congress, but in so doing marginalize the needs of Black citizens by segregating them into a few districts. This allows conservative, White representatives to disregard the needs of African-Americans completely.

Ultimately, the Court’s ruling in Shelby County vs. Holder may actually advance legislative attention to African-American concerns by requiring White representatives to address constituents of all colors and by compelling Black congressmen to broaden their legislative scope since assured re-election in segregated districts ceases.

A Congress more sensitive to the needs of all citizens improves the lives of all Americans.

Davids mom
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The Pendulum
Quote:

A Congress more sensitive to the needs of all citizens improves the lives of all Americans.

Check history. We always seem to swing too far right or left before we get it right. I hope you're right. If we re-elect this Congress that currently has a 10% approval rating, we deserve what we get.

Mike Mahoney
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So why did you come here?

One has to wonder why blacks started coming to Fayetteville in the first place.

Was it/is it for the same reasons most white people chose to live here ...a good school system, a place of conservative, family-oriented and, dare I say, Christian values? Is it because Fayette is a relatively safe place to raise your family ..free (for the moment) of gangs and drugs. Is it because Fayette has a good system of governance? Why did you come?

I also have to wonder what the majority of blacks who've made Fayette County their home really think.

Now that you're here, do you really want to turn Fayette County into Clayton, or Fulton or wherever it was you moved from? Is the voice of the NAACP the voice of blacks in Fayette or is the NAACP simply justifying its existence? Is the NAACP, along with its puppet activists, trying to shame those blacks ...the "Uncle Toms" ...who dare to be conservative, who have found a better life because of their *own* hard work and efforts, who are bucking the stereotypical "entitlement mentality" and who are tired of the age-old out-of-touch activist rhetoric of the NAACP?

Is it really "the Advancement of Colored People" when you have a Federal Judge *give* you what you want and perpetrate the entitlement mentality? Or are you so drugged by that "Kool-Aid" you do not even see it as such? How much sweeter would it be if blacks in Fayette, on their own merits, fronted an *electable* candidate that *all* citizens of this county could support. Would that not lend a truer more satisfying meaning to "the Advancement of Colored People"?

So, the question begs, why did you come?

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Mike Mhoney

As soon as some white people stop referring to all black people as having one ideology; purpose; etc. , we can start discussing reality.

Reailty 1: Some black people may have come to Fayette County for the same reasons that some white people came to Fayette County.

Reality 2: Not all humans who move to Fayette County for its many amenities are Republican.

Reality 3: Not all conservatives who may be black are still 'holding hands' about preferential treatment of anyone - but concerned about a Congress that has not reformed our tax program; our welfare programs; our foreign relations programs; our immigration program; etc., etc., etc. This Congress as of today has a 10% approval rating from the citizens of the United States

Reality 4: There are some citizens who are concerned about the wasting of tax payer money by trying to repeal Obamacare for the 38th time without working cooperatively with their fellow Congress members in ways to improve it!

You see, it's not always about skin color of citizens of Fayette County - but just maybe some black citizens are tired of some white citizens lumping all black citizens into one 'group'. Search your own heart. Do you fear skin color or political party?

Other than this 'political concern' of the Republican Party - the citizens of Fayette County, according the The Citizen, The Chronicle, and The Fayette Woman, seem to be getting along in their neighborhoods, their churches, their recreational areas, their shopping centers just fine. All citizens seem to be concerned about encroaching crime, high gas prices, lowering of home values, etc., etc., etc. Where the Republican Party in Fayette County has left themselves open to criticism is - it (The Republican Party) has not elected a conservative Republican of color to the Board of Education or the County Commission. Now Fayetteville seems to have elected a person of color to their city council - in spite of him running as a Democrat. Citizens of Fayetteville didn't 'get together as blacks' to achieve this accomplishment. (Maybe Democrats did) Republicans - are you saying that you don't have anyone of color in Fayette County of leadership quality that you could support for a position on these two governing bodies? That is the question that some are asking.

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Davids mom ...
Davids mom wrote:

As soon as some white people stop referring to all black people as having one ideology; purpose; etc. , we can start discussing reality.

And how would that happen? How are the stereotypes to be put away when a demographic of people refuse to police their own? Here's a hard statistic: 2/3 of all black children are born without a father. That is reality. That is a fact. That made front page headlines on the nationally read USAToday. Was there any outcry from prominent black leaders in this country? Where was the NAACP? Where was anyone to decry and place effort on improving this sad state of affairs? Not a peep to be heard. It's not so much white people need to change it's that, for the most part, blacks are often times their own worst enemy. You cannot expect others to embrace a race or a culture that allows or fosters this type of behavior. And lets not get into the Rap/Gangster scene. Can you possibly see this how this type of broadly accepted behavior on the part of the black community just might make others a little leery???

Davids mom wrote:

Reailty 1: Some black people may have come to Fayette County for the same reasons that some white people came to Fayette County.

Agreed.

Davids mom wrote:

Reality 2: Not all humans who move to Fayette County for its many amenities are Republican.

Agreed. But you would have to be living under a rock not to realize that Fayette County is very conservative in nature and highly Republican in their vote. As a Democrat, you would have a hard row to hoe if you ran for office ...just as a Republican might in the liberal Democratic environs of, say, Massachusetts or Vermont. That's not to say a Democrat would never be elected but the chances are pretty slim given the ultra-liberal bent of the Democratic party ...which is too bad since Southern Democrats have held high esteem with their constituency.

Davids mom wrote:

Reality 3: Not all conservatives who may be black are still 'holding hands' about preferential treatment of anyone - but concerned about a Congress that has not reformed our tax program; our welfare programs; our foreign relations programs; our immigration program; etc., etc., etc. This Congress as of today has a 10% approval rating from the citizens of the United States.

Agreed. A diverse background of political views is what makes this country great ..*providing* those views are not artificially skewed by special interest groups and/or the government. But what has this to do with changing the election process for Fayette County Commissioners? Other than the fact that special interest groups and the government are actively trying to skew things.

Davids mom wrote:

Reality 4: There are some citizens who are concerned about the wasting of tax payer money by trying to repeal Obamacare for the 38th time without working cooperatively with their fellow Congress members in ways to improve it!

There are many folks interested in repealing ObamaCare and many who hope it continues. Again, that's what makes this country great. I would rather "waste" taxpayer money on strong debate and argumentation regarding the governance of our country or county than to waste it on wars that should never have been fought. And again, what does Washington and ObamaCare have to do with how the people of Fayette County choose to run their elective process?

Davids mom wrote:

You see, it's not always about skin color of citizens of Fayette County - but just maybe some black citizens are tired of some white citizens lumping all black citizens into one 'group'. Search your own heart. Do you fear skin color or political party?

I do not fear either. What I fear is the upheaval of long standing norms because a group of people, special interest groups and race activists ...some of whom are not citizens of this county ...declare our long established electoral process as "wrong" and "unfair". It is "wrong" because said group of people want to short-cut the system. They want a guaranteed outcome without doing the legwork to make it happen on their own. And that is *not* the American way. Blacks are typically liberal and Democratic. You now live in a decidedly conservative Republican area. In order to make things "fair", allow blacks the ability to circumvent the electoral process here in Fayette County and ensure they get their "man" in office, they flip the race card. And that's really all it boils down to. And that really boils my blood and I strongly believe helps perpetuate a rift between whites and blacks. I challenge you, the black community, to come up with a viable candidate to run for office. A person who can represent the needs of *all* people in Fayette County. What makes you think black people can only be represented by a black candidate? Or that whites could not be better served by a black candidate? Are your needs and wants as a citizen of this county somehow different than those of white citizens? That's what's called racism. Racism only "counts" when it is perpetrated by whites against blacks. But blacks practice their own brand of racism that is somehow justified in their own minds.

Davids mom wrote:

Other than this 'political concern' of the Republican Party - the citizens of Fayette County, according the The Citizen, The Chronicle, and The Fayette Woman, seem to be getting along in their neighborhoods, their churches, their recreational areas, their shopping centers just fine. All citizens seem to be concerned about encroaching crime, high gas prices, lowering of home values, etc., etc., etc. Where the Republican Party in Fayette County has left themselves open to criticism is - it (The Republican Party) has not elected a conservative Republican of color to the Board of Education or the County Commission. Now Fayetteville seems to have elected a person of color to their city council - in spite of him running as a Democrat. Citizens of Fayetteville didn't 'get together as blacks' to achieve this accomplishment. (Maybe Democrats did) Republicans - are you saying that you don't have anyone of color in Fayette County of leadership quality that you could support for a position on these two governing bodies? That is the question that some are asking.

The gist of all of this is the attempt by outside influences to change how Fayette County elects their Commissioners. At large voting allows *all* commissioners to work in harmony for the good of the *entire* county and for *all* its citizens. The sniping going on by the NAACP and black activists has nothing to do with what is good for our county and its citizens as a whole. Their agenda is to skew the deck and tilt the playing field so that a black representative will always be on the board of commissioners. Period.

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Mike Mahoney

Gosh Mike - how did Fayetteville elect a black man (Democrat) to the City Council? I have witnessed long time residents here voice abject disapproval of their elected 'white' BOE and County Commission - and it had nothing to do with their race - right? Fayetteville's election suggests that there are people in Fayette County who will elect a responsible person to a leadership position. After 48 years - the Republican Party in Fayette County has failed to elect a person of color to two governing bodies. As I stated before - are there no Republicans of color in Fayette County that the Republican Party would support? Would all citizens in the Republican Party refuse to vote for a Democrat of color who had the leadership skills to work for ALL citizens?

Regarding gerrymandering - it's is the most powerful tool that political parties have in our electoral system - and all parties use it to gain votes that will assure them a representative in an area within the state or national governing bodies. The gist of this is an attempt to change the incorrect perception of Fayette County as an enemy of people of color and the last bastion of 'white supremacists'. After living here for 10 years - it just isn't true - except in an antiquated election procedure.

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Oy ...
Davids mom wrote:

Gosh Mike - how did Fayetteville elect a black man (Democrat) to the City Council?

Because he was a good candidate. But we are talking Fayetteville ...city of ...not Fayette County and their election process. That's what this topic is about.

Davids mom wrote:

I have witnessed long time residents here voice abject disapproval of their elected 'white' BOE and County Commission - and it had nothing to do with their race - right? Fayetteville's election suggests that there are people in Fayette County who will elect a responsible person to a leadership position.

Bingo ...you're beginning to get it ...maybe. And the rest of it is the candidate did it because of his or her own merit under the current process of election for the City of Fayetteville. No redistricting, no special election, no NAACP, no black activists and no Federal edict ...just plain old fashioned "the best candidate won". Now if a Democratic black can be elected under the existing voting process for Fayetteville, why do you ...and the black community ...doubt it can't be done for county Commissioners under the existing "at-large" voting system? Because the NAACP and black race activists say it can't be done?

Davids mom wrote:

After 48 years - the Republican Party in Fayette County has failed to elect a person of color to two governing bodies. As I stated before - are there no Republicans of color in Fayette County that the Republican Party would support? Would all citizens in the Republican Party refuse to vote for a Democrat of color who had the leadership skills to work for ALL citizens?

In order to support a candidate, you need to have one. In case you are unaware, up until recently, there were very few blacks living in Fayette County. Or at least none showing any interest in their local government or school board. Statistically it would be natural there would be few black candidates ...Republican or Democratic ...who would consider running for office. Neither party goes out beating the bushes looking for candidates ...it's ordinary citizens who step forward and make their run for the office. In the twenty-plus years I've lived in Fayette County there has been but one black candidate who stepped forward to run for a commission post. One. No black has has ever, as far as I know, run for BOE.

Davids mom wrote:

Regarding gerrymandering - it's is the most powerful tool that political parties have in our electoral system - and all parties use it to gain votes that will assure them a representative in an area within the state or national governing bodies. The gist of this is an attempt to change the incorrect perception of Fayette County as an enemy of people of color and the last bastion of 'white supremacists'. After living here for 10 years - it just isn't true - except in an antiquated election procedure.

Gerrymandering?? We are talking about the patent change in a voting system that has served the citizens of Fayette County quite well for a very long time. A change perpetrated by a special interest group and activists to ensure a black gets elected to office pure and simple. Racism by proxy and entitlement mentality fomented by some federal judge and the NAACP. You've been here ten years ...outside of not having any blacks step forward to run for office ...has the system worked for you? In your decade of living in Fayette County have you seen examples of "white supremacists" active in Fayette County or felt ostracised as an "enemy"? You throw out toxic inflammatory subjects that have no basis in fact and have nothing to do with the subject at hand. The only reason you deem the current at large voting system as "antiquated" is because no black has been elected to a Commission Post or the Board of Education. That is not the fault of the system. The fault rests with those who chose to sit by and do nothing except wait for the handout.

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Mike Mahoney 3

Thanks for sharing your opinion. The citizens in Fayetteville are also citizens of Fayette County. Fayette County has a reputation of being the last bastion of 'white supremacy'. It appears that for the past 48 years, the Republican Party has not 'beat the bushes' looking for a candidate of color to run for a leadership position on the BOE or the Fayette County Commission. (And of course, that is their right. I also admit some persons of color just may not want to involve themselves with the quality of leaders that Fayette County has elected. I think that will change soon.) (The last bastion of 'white supremacy', IMO, is an ugly description of any community in 2013 of an American city.) After 10 years of living here, I don't believe this county deserves that description - but apparently there are some who are proud of that description. What the citizens of Fayette County have in common is their educational background and income level. Unless our 'leaders' allow additional Section 8 housing, etc. - what has happened to Clayton and other surrounding counties SHOULD NOT happen to Fayette if leaders in the county lead with vision and integrity. (But of course if residents (regardless of color) choose to 'run' and sell their homes to those who have no interest in maintaining the standards of Fayette County - Fayette County will either become a county of gated communities (integrated) or a 'Clayton County'. When any political party plans for 'power' - they are talking 'gerrymandering' of 'districts'. Districtwide voting appears to have served those who value 'white supremacy' or any power-getting well. If this is a misconception - then it is the courts and civil rights organizations that need to understand the 'other' value of Districtwide voting. Again, thanks for sharing your perception of the 'those who are sitting and waiting for a handout'. According to the statistics as recorded in the demographics of Fayette County - those are definitely in the minority in this county.

Quote:

The fault rests with those who chose to sit by and do nothing except wait for the handout

.

The fault lies, IMO, in the lack of understanding and communication between 'some' citizens in Fayette County. It is obvious from some of the discussions in this venue that some citizens are not exactly satisfied with the results of the District wide system that has supposedly worked so well for the citizens of this county. . .and their reasons, from their comments, have very little to do with 'race'. I'm sure you'll correct my perception. Thanks.

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Fayettevillians no; White Supremists yes
Davids mom wrote:

Fayette County has a reputation of being the last bastion of 'white supremacy'.

Give me a break! A reputation among whom? In all my years living in Fayette County, I have never heard or read of anything regarding the "white supremacy" of Fayette County. The NAACP and all the race activists paid no heed to Fayette County until just recently. If we were/are such a "bastion of white supremacy" you'd think we'd have heard something from them a lot sooner ...certainly during your ten year tenure. But not a peep. Makes me wonder where this vitriol you are spouting comes from. Some cold, hard facts would be in order here.

Davids mom wrote:

(The last bastion of 'white supremacy', IMO, is an ugly description of any community in 2013 of an American city.) After 10 years of living here, I don't believe this county deserves that description - but apparently there are some who are proud of that description.

Who would be giving that description to Fayette County? Again, no facts. And who would be these people who claim they are proud that Fayette County is the "last bastion of white supremacy"? Politicians? Judges? Or the redneck crank who lives down the block flying the Stars and Bars in front of his trailer? And the last bastion where? In Georgia? In the Southeast? In your mind? Where? The only people I've heard who are discontent are the race activists and the NAACP ...and I'll bet most of them don't live here.

Davids mom wrote:

Districtwide voting appears to have served those who value 'white supremacy' or any power-getting well.

You use an inflammatory and divisive term for which you give no substantiating facts. It discredits every citizen of this county, it is stereotyping and it is racist. Barring facts, this is an opinion; your opinion. Or is it what the NAACP would have you believe? And so this is why we need to change our method of electing County Commissioners and BOE members...to dispel ...to vanquish and lay to waste ...to shout from the mountain top that the last great bastion of white supremacy has been finally beaten down.

Right.

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NASCAR

We were told by the race pimp Jessie 'hymietown' Jackson that NASCAR was the 'last bastion of white supremecy'.

NASCAR Called 'Bastion of White Supremacy'

In fact, the race pimp Jessie shook NASCAR down for some money.

If NASCAR was the last bastion of white supremecy according to the king of the race pimps Jessie Jackson, then surely that ended when they started appeasing him by giving money to his race mongering organization.

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Mike Mahoney...

I see you've raised some of the same points I shared with DM a few weeks ago. Perhaps I can save you a little time and frustration by summarizing DM's position on race relations:

1) People should judge others solely on the content of their character, without regard for racial background.

2) Creating racially based, gerrymandered voting districts and assuming that only a black elected official can adequately represent black constituents is perfectly fine and acceptable.

3) There is no moral or logical problem with reconciling #1 and #2.

4) If you disagree with #3, it's because you are a scared white person who fears minorities and wishes to cling to "the ways of the past."

It's actually a pretty fascinating exercise in cognitive dissonance. The truth is that there are people like DM - in all racial groups - who understand that they cannot afford to be judged solely on their character. And so they hide behind the aegis of racial identity and seek an advantage over others through lawsuits and court mandates.

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Good summary SilverStar. I think DM is a composite

DM is either a committee of people interested in stirring the racial pot - each on duty one day a week and each with a slightly different set of beliefs OR she is a paid blogger for some racist organization like the NAACP. Either would explain the disconnect with logical thinking and the constant injection of race into every single thing.

tgarlock
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RWM, DM is a real person, she . . .

. . . and I met for coffee and a long conversation about a year ago. My guess is she's just as committed to her views as I am to mine.

Terry Garlock

G35 Dude
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Conspiracy?

Based on my history with DM here, I could believe the composite of several people theory. When I first began to read and respond to her I felt that she was just an older black woman stuck in the past. Lately she seems to have become more aggressive, rude and less aware of what was said from post to post.

Robert W. Morgan
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Well now, tgarlock has thrown cold water on that idea

Too bad, I was certain she couldn't be real. The aggressive and rude uptick is not exclusive to her - there's a lot of that going around lately. Oh well, God bless her.
Of course maybe tgarlock isn't real either. I accepted his photo as looking like someone familiar that I had seen around town, but it may just be a stock photo of some male model or movie star. Brando? DeNiro?

AtHomeGym
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Morgan, TGarlock & Who's Who

Oh that's his picture alright--and he is for real!

suggarfoot
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DM...several old fosilized NAACP ?

More than one person thinks that is possible. Their days as race baiters are not so great unless they stir the pot. Their salaries may depend on it. And so, quite possilbly...DM is created.

Davids mom
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Mike Mahoney 2
Quote:

You cannot expect others to embrace a race or a culture that allows or fosters this type of behavior. And lets not get into the Rap/Gangster scene.

Embrace a race? What happened to accepting individuals based on their character and contribution to the community? Should I embrace a white person because of his/her race? There is a subculture in all races in the US that most educated people do not ‘embrace’. Do you embrace a ‘white’ criminal because he is ‘white’? Listen to yourself. We have heard your ‘speak’ for so long – we’re glad that the younger generation is wearing ear plugs and judging individuals by their character rather than their skin color.

Quote:

But you would have to be living under a rock not to realize that Fayette County is very conservative in nature and highly Republican in their vote.

What in the world does that have to do with where I choose to live? I have some wonderful Republican/conservative neighbors – what we check on the ballot has very little to do with how we treat one another as human beings. Do you only associate with Republicans? Well, that’s your right. Not everyone interacts with fellow humans based on their political party.

Quote:

But what has this to do with changing the election process for Fayette County Commissioners? Other than the fact that special interest groups and the government are actively trying to skew things.

How will one representative of a different color or different political party ‘skew’ the majority vote in Fayette County?

Quote:

I do not fear either. What I fear is the upheaval of long standing norms because a group of people, special interest groups and race activists ...some of whom are not citizens of this county ...declare our long established electoral process as "wrong" and "unfair". It is "wrong" because said group of people want to short-cut the system.

Well, Mike – we appear to have the same view, but from different perspectives. There was a long standing ‘norm’ that oppressed the vote of a segment of American citizens in this country. I was a member of that segment until the late 60’s in the state of Georgia. What made me a member of that segment was not my educational level, my employment status, my gender – but the color of my skin. I am very grateful for the American citizens (of all races) who declared that according to the words in our Constitution, that type of oppression was ‘wrong’ and ‘unfair’. If what has been happening in Fayette County has not been ‘wrong’ or ‘unfair’ – the courts have the responsibility to straighten this out. That’s the American way. Right?

conditon55
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Walk a mile in the other guys shoes..

""While black Americans link arms and sway as they sing, “We shall overcome!” I now have to wonder, “Overcome what?”

The only discrimination I see is the preferential treatment on their behalf that our government continues to impose. And then I realize the very thing that race hustlers like Jesse Jackson feed on — fear.""

What discrimination? Right ?

Or is it about no taxation with out representation? Stop the tyranny of the majority ? and Don't tread on me - meaning people working to assert their constitutional and legal rights ?

You seem to hold a particular block of Americans in particularly low esteem.

Are you willing to walk a mile in their shoes? for a day, a week, a month, a year ? How about an entire lifetime ? No ? Why not ?

conditon55
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Walk a mile in the other guys shoes..

""While black Americans link arms and sway as they sing, “We shall overcome!” I now have to wonder, “Overcome what?”

The only discrimination I see is the preferential treatment on their behalf that our government continues to impose. And then I realize the very thing that race hustlers like Jesse Jackson feed on — fear.""

What discrimination? Right ?

Or is it about no taxation with out representation? Stop the tyranny of the majority ? and Don't tread on me - meaning people working to assert their constitutional and legal rights ?

You seem to hold a particular block of Americans in particularly low esteem.

Are you willing to walk a mile in their shoes? for a day, a week, a month, a year ? How about an entire lifetime ? No ? Why not ?