Is the United States a Christian nation?

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For a number of years there has been a discussion among many about whether the United States is or is not a Christian nation.

What the recent elections have established is that the United States is no longer governed or overwhelmingly influenced by Christian values and that a culture that opposes the Christian culture has become entrenched.

One political party has embraced same-sex marriages/unions as a viable and legitimate lifestyle. The same party has produced a President that is, arguably, the most pro-abortion chief executive in the history of the nation. The majority of Americans have affirmed and embraced that policy by their votes.
An ever-increasing number of states are legalizing same-sex marriages and it is reasonable to assume that the issue will eventually go to the Supreme Court. Whether the Court will make same-sex marriage a constitutionally protected right (as was done in the case of abortion in 1973) remains to be seen.
Whatever one may personally believe about same-sex relationships and the ending of human life through abortion, one cannot argue that the Church has ever been supportive of these two practices during its long history.

Only in recent years have certain groups and denominations within Christianity rejected biblical and historic tradition and embraced these two positions.
There has been low-level hostility toward the historic Christian faith for some time and one can anticipate that this cultural hostility will continue and will, in fact, increase.

In certain nations in the world, a pastor who teaches the biblical and traditional view of marriage can be charged with a hate crime. Could it happen in America?
Once, such a proposition was unthinkable but, in a progressive, relativistic, and hostile culture, such a scenario becomes not only possible but eventually probable.
Not so long ago, evangelical Christians and conservative Catholics could comfort themselves with the thought that the majority of Americans shared their traditional values.

However, it has been reported that, in the last election, 25 million evangelicals abandoned their historic values and embraced the values of the liberals. And the Catholic bishops have discovered that politicians — Catholic politicians — regularly reject the values of their church and flaunt their dissent publicly. Many Catholic priests and bishops continue to serve the sacraments to politicians whose public positions violate Catholic dogma, serving only to further confuse their flocks.
So, is the United States a Christian nation (or a nation governed by Judeo-Christian values)?

The answer to the question is, “No, it is not.”

The majority of Americans have made a choice and continue to make that choice. There is a new reality in the land — a reality that Christians and the Church must come to grips with.

The Scriptures are no longer the foundation for belief or for conduct — even among many Christians. Biblical Christians are now a minority in the United States, and there will be ramifications.

What will this new reality eventually produce? That remains to be seen, but the future will be different than the past.

One small businessman said last week, “America is not now the country in which I grew up.”

No, it is not. But it is the new reality.

We are not a Christian nation. Not any more. Maybe never again.

David Epps is the pastor of the Cathedral of Christ the King, 4881 Hwy. 34 E., Sharpsburg, GA 30277. Services are held Sundays at 8:30 and 10 a.m. (www.ctkcec.org). He is the bishop of theDiocese of the Mid-South (www.midsouthdiocese.org. He may be contacted at frepps@ctkcec.org.]

JeffC
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Better check again Rev Epps
David Epps wrote:

However, it has been reported that, in the last election, 25 million evangelicals abandoned their historic values and embraced the values of the liberals.

God sent two hurricanes to influence the election, the first to disrupt the Republican convention and the second to blunt Romney's campaign and give Obama a chance to look presidential and boost him at the end of the campaign.

God seems to be on the liberal's side.

PTC Observer
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JeffC - God

You write it with such certainty too. Perhaps God is trying to teach us a lesson in outcomes of a different sort. All we do know is that God has given us our freedom to act, how we do that and how it all turns out is on our heads. I predict it won't turn out well for anyone, progressives or conservatives. Both factions and their policies will sweep our comfortable life aside, just like a hurricane.

rolling stone
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David Epps

You contribute very handsomely to the argument for taking away the tax exempt status for religious organizations that partake in politics and influencing lawmakers.

NUK_1
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rollingstone

I totally agree and it's a long time coming for that, but who knows? I never thought in my lifetime I'd see gay marriage legal in more states than marijuana so anything is possible :)

rolling stone
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NUK_1: its all about the Benjamins.

Regarding the tax exempt status of religious organizations: render unto Caesar the things that are Caesar's. When they are dealing in the secular world then they need to pay to play. And just wait until other states see the revenue that rolls in from legal marijuana in Colorado and Washington. I read where the Mexican cartels are estimating that they will lose about $1.5 billion in each state. Cha-ching, cha-ching.

Robert W. Morgan
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I hope those 2 states were smart enough to tax these sales

I can't believe $1.5billion in each state unless that is for 5 years or something like that, but if Colorado and Washington are collecting tax on legal marijuana sales, we will all know very soon.

Of course other states will notice this as well and if they have a chance to balance their budget by legalizing and then taxing - watch for the floodgates to open. Even Georgia with its legislature well-stocked with bible thumpers can get on that bandwagon.

Then since you can't tax gay marriage - Georgia will certainly bypass that one - we will start looking for the next "harmless" thing to tax. Already doing quite well on liquor, cigarettes and gasoline and of course our incomes, so what will be next? Heroin, cocaine? How about those bath salts? A modest little 10% tax on some of these things would really help the state treasury.

Or go whole hog - take over the entire drug supply chain. Sort of like the lottery. Or, look at New Hampshire. "live free or die" means no state income tax, no state sales tax - all you have to do is let the state run the liquor business - big revenue.

We really are making progress in this country. Makes me proud to be living in these interesting times.

rolling stone
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Robert W. Morgan: new tax revenue

Besides taxing the physical assets of religious organizations, the next best new tax would be on sugar. Say goodbye to the national debt, providing we hold spending to current levels.

NUK_1
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rollingstone: Those numbers seem a little "high" to me

1.5bil in each state just from pot? I could believe it if it were legal coke or heroin but that's a ton of weed there. Of course, expect to see the drug kingpins protesting that those two states are "HATERS" for cutting into the cartel's drug profits :) Regardless, good for Colorado and Washington. It failed in California two years ago but I don't think ti will fail the next time unless the Feds decide to squash the states legalizing marijuana.

rolling stone
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NUK_1: high numbers

Maybe I got it confused: perhaps that would be the revenue from taxing politically active religious organizations. Regardless, I believe the cartels were calculating the loss from adjoining states also. They are brutal thugs but they do know the business.

Davids mom
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David Epps
Quote:

So, is the United States a Christian nation (or a nation governed by Judeo-Christian values)?
The answer to the question is, “No, it is not.”

There are many who disagree with you - Teach the Christ - not politics. The actions of our citizens throughout our history shows that we do follow the commands as found in The Bible.

G35 Dude
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DM-I disagree
Quote:

There are many who disagree with you - Teach the Christ - not politics. The actions of our citizens throughout our history shows that we do follow the commands as found in The Bible.

The separation of Church and State was intended to protect the church from the state not the other way around.If a pastor feels that the people are straying from the way of the Lord it is his responsibility to speak out. You do of course have the right to disagree. You don't have the right to tell him not to speak.

Davids mom
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Teach the Christ

Is not saying 'don't speak'. One can teach the Christ without 'siding' with a POLITICAL ideology. Our law is based on the laws found in the Bible. The Civil Rights movement was led by ministers and religious leaders. (Do unto others). (I happen to understand that the Christ ante dates Abraham and/or Adam)

G35 Dude
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Not Politics

But you said "Teach the Christ-Not politics". Would you have offered the same advice to MLK?

Davids mom
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MLK

Based his narratives on the Christ thought and the preaching of Ghandi. Love your neighbor, and non violence. Didn't need to 'teach ' MLK . The actions demonstrated by some of our laws did not demonstrate the Christ thought - so some of the laws had to be changed by the politicians, not the 'preachers'.

G35 Dude
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Is your last name Romney?

First you say:

Quote:

Teach the Christ not the politics

Then say:

Quote:

The Civil Rights movement was led by ministers and religious leaders.

Then you say:

Quote:

The actions demonstrated by some of our laws did not demonstrate the Christ thought - so some of the laws had to be changed by the politicians, not the 'preachers'.

Have you become a politician? LOL

Davids mom
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G35 Dude

Sorry - was that over your head? Ministers and religious leaders led a movement to change the laws that were considered unjust. Politicians/legislators changed the law. My name is not Romney. MLK was a religious leader, not an elected official or a politician. Romney and I are not elected officials. I am not a leader - and half of the country aren't too sure about Romney - and voted for the other guy.

G35 Dude
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DM-Stay on track
Quote:

Sorry - was that over your head?

What do you think? LOL

Quote:

My name is not Romney. MLK was a religious leader, not an elected official or a politician. Romney and I are not elected officials. I am not a leader - and half of the country aren't too sure about Romney - and voted for the other guy.

Thanks for the history lesson. But I never disputed any of that.

So lets get back to your original statement that religious leaders should stick to "Teaching the Christ not politics". That statement is what I've disagreed with. I believe that not only religious leaders but all citizens have a right to speak on that topic. And maybe religious leaders even have a responsibility to do so if they feel that the country is being led astray. Now before you go off on a tangent and say that I said the country is being led astray reread what I said.

Davids mom
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G35

You didn't say anything different. Preachers can preach their concept of religious truths without going into the 'political nomenclature IMO :

Quote:

David Epps wrote:
However, it has been reported that, in the last election, 25 million evangelicals abandoned their historic values and embraced the values of the liberals.

The values of the base of Christianity and many other religions is: Love your neighbor as yourself, etc. Is he saying that liberals do not believe this? Is it being said that evangelicals have forsaken this element of Christianity? What are the historic values of evangelicals that are different from what Jesus taught ? Thanks for clearing this up for me.

Separation of church and state is respected by many religious leaders and they are very astute in adhering to that separation in their narratives. Liberals describes the ideology of a political group in our country - not a religious group.

lion
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Secular nation

The United States is a secular nation.

Practice your religion in private. I will practice mine in private also.

Stop trying to use the government to impose your religious or pseudo-religious beliefs on all American citizens.

PTC Observer
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Lion - We

agree, wonders never cease. Now all we have to do is get you to see the same wisdom on taking people's property by force of unjust laws.