Blogs

The ‘equality’ conundrum of gay ‘marriage’: Where judgment begins

Debbie Thurman's picture

You know about the brouhaha, right? Seven million Californians voted to uphold the ages-old view that marriage is between one man and one woman and enshrined it into their state’s constitution. With one judicial stroke, a federal judge nullified their will. It’s becoming a common theme. Read More»

Scientists are biased, just like the rest of us

Dr. Harold Brown's picture

Reporters and commentators frequently cite scientists as support for positions. In headlines, scientists assess disasters (“Scientists say Gulf spill is way worse than estimated”), bolster environmental actions (“Scientists say mountaintop mining should be stopped”) even to make the obvious official (“Drought grips some of Harris County, scientists say”). Read More»

Deep fried, Southern style . . .

Ronda Rich's picture

A friend of mine returned a call of mine one day while he was sitting in the Dallas airport, waiting for a flight out. He explained that he had just spent two days at the Texas State Fair and it was, he said, quite a sight to behold.

“You wouldn’t believe it. You need to put it on your list of things to do,” he said. “You have never seen so much food in your life. And, get this: they fry everything.”

Hmm. Sounds like my kind of place. “Like what?” I asked.

“They have deep fried battered bacon, fried butter, fried pizza, fried peanut butter. They even have fried Coke.” Read More»

Georgia’s anchor offensive lineman Ben Jones knows discipline

Loran Smith's picture

Those who should know give Ben Jones high marks as a prospect for Sunday employment in the National Football League. If he realizes his lifelong ambition, there will be many reasons noted for his reaching his goal.

For starters, the Georgia center has adequate physical dimensions (6-foot-2, 300 pounds) and the footwork, which can enhance the balance he needs to thwart the bull rushes of opposing linemen. Further, he has the quickness to make the cutoff and “reach” blocks, but there is more. Read More»

Barred owl a piece of work

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

Listen. Hear that? These evenings when it’s cool enough to have a window open, around midnight, take a moment and listen for an owl.

Traffic is light and humans are mostly indoors at this time of day, so one may surmise that an owl feels safe enough to come out and vocalize in the quiet darkness. Step outside and listen.

What a piece of work an owl is.

Let me introduce to you one of the really interesting members of the bird family, Strix varia, or the barred owl. Colloquially he is called a hoot owl; I call him a hootie owl. Read More»

Peachtree City UPDATES - Week of August 30, 2010

Betsy Tyler's picture

Thursday Council meeting, Wednesday DAPC meeting, recycling reminder, path safety, and Highway 74 South detour rescheduled. Read More»

When we were kids

Rick Ryckeley's picture

When we were kids, life was much simpler. No thoughts of bills, health issues, or death ever entered our minds. When The Boy gets to be my age, he may very well look back and say the same thing, but I can assure him, life is not simpler now. Guess it really depends on your point of view. Read More»

Headline news

David Epps's picture

In one of the local newspapers recently, the front page headlines read, “Fatal Shooting,” “Pedestrian Killed on Highway 34,” along with the announcement about the death of a local leader, and the news of six teenagers who were involved in a car accident. True enough, the headlines are often filled with disaster, death, and violence. Yet, on the same front page was this headline, “Children Help Firefighters Rescue Kitten from Drain.” Read More»

Cell phone etiquette

Greg Moffatt's picture

“…so I told her to **** off…”  That was a piece of a conversation I couldn’t help overhearing in a store recently.  The speaker, a teenage girl, was apparently unhappy with something another girl had done and she littered her five-minute conversation with profanities and vulgarities, completely insensitive to anyone standing nearby, including a mother with two young children.  Read More»

Where did Sunday School come from?

Justin Kollmeyer's picture

I love history. I love Sunday School. So it only stands to reason that I would love the “History of Sunday School,” right?

Here’s a short version, thanks mainly to an article by Timothy Larson of Christian History magazine.

Sunday Schools were originally schools where poor children could learn to read. The Sunday School movement began in Britain in the 1780s. The Industrial Revolution had resulted in many children spending all week long working in factories. Christian philanthropists wanted to free these children from a life of illiteracy. Read More»