Blogs

Southern way of death

Ronda Rich's picture

Months before Mama died, she worried incessantly about the cost of obituaries in newspapers. Some charge by the word, you know.

Staunchly Scotch-Irish that she was – and a child of the Depression – every penny counted for this woman of the Southern Appalachians. When I cleaned out her old freezer, I found four dozen large butter tubs of homemade vegetable soup, all dated with ink on a strip of masking tape, many going back as far as 15 or 20 years. She was cautious about the economy before it was fashionable. Read More»

Growing old is not for sissies

Dr. David L. Chancey's picture

A man came in from his golf game and his wife asked, “How’d you do?”

“Well, I was hitting pretty well, but my eyesight has gotten so bad I couldn’t see where the ball went.”

“Well, you’re 80 years old, Jack,” the wife said, “Why don’t you take my brother along?”

Jack protested, “But he’s 90 years old and doesn’t even play golf any longer.”

His wife said, “But he’s got perfect eyesight. He could watch your golf ball.”

The next day Jack tried Edna’s idea and took her brother along. He teed up, swung and the ball disappeared down the middle of the fairway. Read More»

Washing machine

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

A friend handed me a copy of Mrs. Albert Wiese’s letter to the Kosanke Bros., who sold her husband a new washing machine, circa 1927.

Kouts, Ind.

Kosanke Bros.

Kouts, Ind.

Dear Sirs: Read More»

Getting over 9/11

David Epps's picture

Several days ago I was reading about the proposed mosque to be built near the scene of the 9/11 attacks in New York. The nationally known newspaper had interviewed a number of persons and the opinions on the subject were varied. One, however, stood out to me.

Commenting on the opposition to putting the mosque near the attack site, one person, a young American woman, said something like this: “The 9/11 attacks were nine years ago. Isn’t it about time people got over this?” Read More»

The tree

Rick Ryckeley's picture

Some in the town say the tree has stood for a hundred years. Others say it’s much older. Alone in a field of emerald grass almost as soft as carpet, the old pear tree still stands – although it has seen better days.

It was magnificent: 30 feet towards the sky its branches once reached, but no longer. Bent and twisted by time and circumstance, what’s left of the largest pear tree in town now barely reaches one-third that height. Still, against all odds, from season to season, its function hasn’t changed: providing shade from the harsh sun during the summer and fresh fruit during the fall. Read More»

The coming showdown with public employees

Cal Beverly's picture

Few in the media have drawn the lines between the increasing dots in our national financial meltdown. The raw numbers are being reported; the obvious conclusions have not been drawn. I take no pleasure in what I am concluding; nevertheless, here are the data. Judge whether my conclusions are warranted.

California leads the nation in budget toxicity. The state’s generous public employee pension system is the biggest of the black holes in that state’s descent into bankruptcy. Read More»

What revival looks like

Cal Thomas's picture

In calling for a spiritual revival in America at his Lincoln Memorial rally Aug. 28, talk show host Glenn Beck reached back into history and touched on a familiar theme.

What would a genuine revival look like and how did those that have transformed America several times in the past get started? Earlier revivals were not created from the mobilization of large crowds. They occurred when people did something infrequently observed in modern times: humbled themselves. Read More»

Fayette ranks high among Georgia schools — but we can do better

Dr. Kevin Demmitt's picture

If you ask a family that has relocated to Fayette County why they chose to live here, one of the answers will likely be the quality of the school system. The school system was one of the reasons my wife and I chose to live here when we were house hunting. My children attended Fayette County schools from elementary through high school. All three are now in college or graduated.

I appreciate the many skilled teachers who invested in them and helped develop their talents and abilities to prepare them for the next level of education. That is one of the best measures of a good school system. Read More»

Transportation is the important topic again

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

Dear Mayor Haddix,

I don’t believe we have formally met, and I should rectify that. But I’m writing now to express my hope that you will be taking your place on the regional transportation planning group with enthusiasm and openness to ideas once believed to be unpopular.

There is a knee-jerk response among elected officials here that regional mass transit is not welcome in Fayette County, that we don’t need it, and that it will bring crime to the area. You are in a perfect position to help dispel those notions and show leadership in bringing Fayette into the 21st century. Read More»

English is Georgia’s official language; guess who’s breaking the law?

Claude Paquin's picture

Should English be the official language in Georgia?

Personally, I would think so. But obviously thousands and thousands of our best educated people in Georgia disagree.

It seems that every ten years or so our Georgia legislature gets excited about this. In 1986, our legislature adopted a resolution making English the official state language.

Thinking that was not enough, in 1996 our Georgia General Assembly enacted a statute (code section 50-3-100) designating English as our official language and requiring its use in governmental documents and records. Read More»

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