Blogs

Rub dirt on it

Rick Ryckeley's picture

Someone once said, “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.” Obviously that person never spent anytime growing up on Flamingo Street.

Back then, ask any kid in our neighborhood and they’ll tell ya — many injuries came from playing with sticks and stones, but the worst injuries came from words. Five little words to be precise – “I double dog dare ya.” Read More»

Should veterans step up?

David Epps's picture

Today, the percentage of military veterans in the United States Congress is at its lowest rate since World War II. According to a report by CNN, only 20 percent of the 535 members of the new Congress have served in the military, 25 from the Senate and 90 from the House of Representatives. Compare that to the Congress of 1975, where 70 percent of the members were military veterans. Read More»

Why go to church?

Justin Kollmeyer's picture

I can think of no better way to start this New Year than to affirm our regular attendance in our houses of worship. I put first importance on our spiritual wellbeing, but did you know that scientific research has indicated many physical and emotional benefits as well?

An article on scribd.com reported on 52 reasons to go to church, including full references to the scientific research. I’ll share just what we have room for here. Read More»

The shot reported around the world

Cal Beverly's picture

Some preliminary thoughts in the aftermath of the accidental shooting New Year’s Day in Peachtree City that received global news coverage.

First, the good news. Margaret McCollum, 58, of 103 Autumn Leaf, is recovering from a gunshot wound to her back, her medical condition having been raised to “good” as of Tuesday.

The other good news — after initial sketchy reports fueled ominous speculations — is that the shooting of Peachtree City Police Chief Will McCollom’s wife in their bed at 4 a.m. Jan. 1 was an accident, a terrible accident. Read More»

The ‘equality’ racket

Thomas Sowell's picture

Some time ago, burglars in England scrawled a message on the wall of a home they had looted: “RICH BASTARDS.”

Those two words captured the spirit of the politicized vision of equality — that it was a grievance when someone was better off than themselves. Read More»

Liberals’ use of black people, Part II

Walter Williams's picture

Last week’s column focused on the ways liberals use blacks in pursuit of their leftist agenda, plus their demeaning attitudes toward black people. Most demeaning are their double standards.

It was recently reported that Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., the House majority whip, spoke at a 2002 gathering hosted by white supremacist leaders when he was a Louisiana state representative. Some are calling on Scalise to step down or for House Speaker John Boehner to fire him. There’s no claim that Scalise made racist statements. Read More»

Mario Cuomo – the rhetoric vs. the record

Cal Thomas's picture

How precious in the sight of progressives was one of their saints, Mario Cuomo, the three-term governor of New York who died last week at age 82. He was a model of progressivism and a gifted rhetorician.

In most media accounts, references were made to two speeches Cuomo delivered in 1984, one at the Democratic National Convention in San Francisco where Walter Mondale was nominated for president, and the other at the University of Notre Dame where Cuomo spoke about abortion and the “proper” role of religion in politics. Read More»

Everything works out if you let it

Ronda Rich's picture

A friend of mine, long embroiled in upsets, distractions, problems and tribulations, called one day to announce happily that she was learning to “let things roll right off my back.”

“Really?” I asked. “And, how is that?”

She explained that her accountant had called to discuss a tax return, due that day after a couple of extensions and told her that she owed $15,000.

There was a silent pause, then she asked, “How can that be? We spent more money than we made last year.” I like that logic. If you spent it and don’t have, how can you pay it? Read More»

Attending funerals

Carolyn Cary's picture

I sure have been to a lot of funerals lately. I guess when you become older than dirt, that happens.

One funeral was conducted by a preacher who loved to sing. Not only did he lead the congregation in song, but when he followed the deceased up the aisle, he was belting out a song with all he had. And yes, he was good at it.

At another funeral, the deceased for decades had always sat in the same seat. If you’re a church-goer, you know that the faithful will always sit in the same spot, and woe be to those who dare to occupy that spot. Read More»

I feel small

Rick Ryckeley's picture

Well, here it is again — that old familiar feeling. Just when I think I’m big and important in the world, I suddenly realize just the opposite is true. Now, this may not be the most positive way to start the New Year, but at least it’s honest.

Did I have this revelation in our little sleepy, but zombie-infested, hometown of Senoia, Ga.? Nope, this time The Wife and me, we had to travel all the way to Europe. Read More»

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