Blogs

Egypt shows why you can’t buy friendship

Scott Bradshaw's picture

The United States bribed Egyptian dictator Hosni Mubarak and his predecessors for decades, giving their government up to $1.3 billion annually to help maintain a well-equipped military. Our stated objective was to insure stability in the region. Stability is code for “hold the people down, keep the Suez Canal open, and honor the treaty with Israel.” Read More»

Judy, the sad girl

Ronda Rich's picture

The other day I took a shortcut down a back road, the likes of which I had not seen since I was a child in petticoats and Mary Janes and rode the big, yellow schoolbus.

The road was dirt and gravel back then, twisting sharply from corner to corner as it wound itself around mostly pastures and creeks. There were, perhaps, three houses on the road, one of which was a white clapboard farm house with a front porch, steep steps and a postage stamp-sized front yard. Read More»

The multiple ways the new Obamacare law may affect you in 2011

Sally C. Pipes's picture

A federal judge recently ruled President Obama’s healthcare law unconstitutional. The U.S. Supreme Court will no doubt have to settle the matter, but several of the reform package’s most damaging provisions have already taken root.

For starters, the new law effectively stops the construction of physician-owned hospitals throughout the country — even as it extends government-subsidized insurance coverage to tens of millions of new patients. Read More»

Remembering Jack Bush, ‘a damn good Dog’

Loran Smith's picture

At the conclusion of the graveside service at Oconee Hill cemetery, where many Georgia football lettermen are interred, Jack Bush’s son-in-law John Parker stood up and invited all those in attendance to a reception, noting that it would be “Jack Bush’s last tailgate party.”

When friends gathered at the Sexton House at the entrance to the cemetery, there was a sign, noting that it was a tailgate party in memory of one of Georgia’s most loyal friends who best could be described as a Damn Good Dog. Read More»

Ask Father Paul - 02/23/11

Father Paul Massey's picture

Answers to your questions about life, religion and the Bible

Pastors get some of the most interesting questions from people they meet and people in their congregations. Here are a few that I have gotten during my ministry and via e-mail for this column. Read More»

The perfect parent

Greg Moffatt's picture

Her son was only eighteen months old. He was a feisty child with quite a temper, but otherwise perfectly normal. Even his temper was well within the normal range of emotions for a child his age. Mom was new at the job and deathly afraid of making a mistake. I walked her to the door of my office and she looked up at me with the most desperate eyes.

“I just want to be a perfect parent,” she said. “I know I’ll make mistakes, but I don’t want to make any big ones.” Read More»

Peachtree City UPDATES - Week of Feb. 21, 2011

Betsy Tyler's picture

Flat Stanley visits PTC, stormwater bills and credit applications, Georgia Work Ready program, and more . . . Read More»

It done got complicated

Rick Ryckeley's picture

Mrs. Newsome would have a duck fit over the title of this story. She was my tenth-grade English teacher at Briarwood High School, home of the Mighty Buccaneers. After berating me once again about how I, single-handedly, hath destroyed the Queen’s English, she would quickly follow up by asking, “And just how does a duck have a fit?” Read More»

Taming the telephone

David Epps's picture

I am grateful that we live in the modern technological age. Growing up in East Tennessee, I had first-hand experience with outhouses, homes without air conditioning, telephone party lines, dirt and gravel roads, three channels on the black and white TV, and putting clothes outside on the line to dry. I agree with Carly Simon who once sang, “These are the good old days.” Read More»

How bad is it? Well, just let me tell you . . .

Cal Beverly's picture

Just for fun, here is a gleaning of opinions that go under the general headings of “How bad is ...?” and “What now?”

How bad is our national jobless situation? This from Mort Zuckerman of U.S. News and World Report:

“Altogether, the 9 percent headline figure is an illusory portrait of the situation across the country, representing 13,863,000 men and women out of work. What happens if you add to that the 8.4 million ‘involuntary’ part-time employed, whose hours have been cut back? Then you get a household unemployment rate slightly under 17 percent. ... Read More»