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My last column

David Epps's picture

This is my last and final column.

Well, it might be.

It could be, that is, if Preacher Harold Camping is right.

The Rev’d Camping, leader of the Oakland, CA-based Family Radio World, an independent Christian ministry, has announced that, at 6 p.m., Saturday, May 21, 2011, the end of the world begins with a massive earthquake. Since that’s just a few hours away, I thought that you should know in case there’s anything you need to do to get ready. Read More»

First class

Rick Ryckeley's picture

I learned early on in this life that some go first class while the rest of us simply go coach. Growing up at 110 Flamingo Street, we went coach. The rich folks who lived over on the Duke of Gloucester always went first class.

Forty years later things haven’t changed much; I’m still sitting firmly in coach. And the rich folks still sit in first class. The difference is instead of being separated by a thick grove of trees, like Flamingo and The Duke, we’re separated by a black mesh curtain. Confused? Well, welcome to my world. Keep reading, dear reader, it’ll all make sense at the end. Read More»

The Wall That Heals

Terry Garlock's picture

The approach of Memorial Day prompts my thought that there should be a memorial for those who died, and many still in harm’s way, in Afghanistan and Iraq. To appreciate those thoughts you would have to understand the power of what we call The Wall, the 58,195 names etched in the black marble panels of the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, D.C.

The power of The Wall has much to do with what beats in the hearts of many Americans affected by that war, and a little to do with the memorial’s design. Read More»

Obama’s gift to the middle class

Dr. John A. Sparks's picture

President Obama is now openly proposing tax increases on at least two important fronts as part of his “solution” to the growing debt crisis.

The president’s favorite approach is to talk about the “wealthiest Americans.” In his speech on April 13, he proclaimed that he will do away with the “Bush tax cuts” for the rich as soon as he has the opportunity.

Just a week later, April 21, he said that wealthier taxpayers like him should be willing to pay “a little bit more” to prevent various social programs for the elderly and the young from being cut. Read More»

A quick, sharp tongue

Ronda Rich's picture

My niece, Nicole, was saying the other day how a quick, sharp tongue is built into our DNA and how we need to watch what we say and how we say it.

If you haven’t already read between the lines, that was her attempt to be subtle and encourage me to watch what I say. Of course, it was a waste of her sweet breath, but I pretended to pay attention and agreed with what she said. Read More»

Apocalypse now? Why a radio preacher is wrong

Cal Thomas's picture

Politicians and political activists frequently declare the end of the world will occur if their candidate isn’t elected, or if the debt ceiling isn’t raised. Some conservative Christians think the end is on the way because of behavior and practices they judge immoral. Somehow the country, not to mention the planet, survives and when “doomsday” passes, the prognosticators live to predict Armageddon on another day. Read More»

Inflation: Food, fuel and the Fed

Dr. Mark W. Hendrickson's picture

As Americans increasingly feel the pinch of higher prices for food and fuel, the Federal Reserve’s QE2 policy of creating more money has been called into question. Asked if the Fed bore some responsibility for these vexing price increases, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke essentially replied, “It’s not our fault.” Instead, Bernanke blamed the price increases on “global supply and demand conditions.”

Is Chairman Bernanke correct? To use a well-known phrase: Not exactly. Read More»

Rationing hope: FDA’s cancer drug ban preview of the future

Grace-Marie Turner's picture

Great Britain’s national health agency late last year reaffirmed its decision to deny the breakthrough drug Avastin to patients with advanced breast cancer. Just days later, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) followed suit, denying treatment — and hope — to the 17,500 American breast cancer patients prescribed Avastin each year.

This is a sign of things to come. Under the new health overhaul law, far too many medical decisions will be made by bureaucrats — not doctors and patients. Read More»

A little soccer match

Loran Smith's picture

It was a sunny spring morning, and the Tigers were playing the Sparks in a soccer match for those who are yet to be enrolled in kindergarten.

The Tigers wore navy blue and were coached by Chris Martin. Coaching the Sparks was Jay Erickson. The teams were coed, a fact which went happily unnoticed by the young players. There are no issues at kiddie soccer matches.

The length of time for the quarters is left up to the coaches. They usually start with five-minute quarters, but as disinterest sets in, they become shorter. Read More»

Ga. Medicaid program needs a big dose of reality

Benita Dodd's picture

Much like the tale of the blind men and the elephant, proposals to reform Medicaid are influenced by the perspective: Taxpayers see lighter paychecks; beneficiaries see increased coverage; state budget writers see a spiraling commitment. Liberals see a need for a bigger program to cover more people and conservatives see an opportunity to do better with less government. Still, all are aware of this elephant in the room.

Without a doubt, the entitlement program for qualified low-income elderly, disabled, children and families is consuming an increasing portion of the state budget. Read More»

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