Blogs

Dixie Dew finally has her say

Ronda Rich's picture

I’m Dixie Dew. If you read my mama’s column weekly then you know that I’m the precious little red-haired dachshund of which she so affectionately writes every week. For the record, and not because I’m a bragger, but I am every bit as cute as she says. If anything, she downplays my cuteness.

That’s one thing she definitely tells the truth about, though some of that other stuff is embellished. Some of it is just a big lie. For one thing, I am not fat. Read More»

PTC can’t just tax its way out of budget shortages

Don Haddix's picture

As you can see, this has been a very busy year and it is far from over. The city has a lot to do and, to be honest, money along with other issues to resolve.

On the city structure change, contrary to what some have said, it was not a quick decision. A lot of time and effort went into it on many levels by many people. Read More»

PTC Council has lost its credibility, should resign

Scott Bradshaw's picture

A political lynching took place at the Peachtree City Council meeting last Thursday.

The Leisure Services Department, frequently called “Recreation,” was eliminated and two prominent recreation managers were shown the door.

The action by council to eliminate the unit was deceptive and shameful. The uncomfortable vote was unanimous with Eric Imker, Kim Learnard, Vanessa Fleisch, Doug Sturbaum and Mayor Don Haddix voting in favor of the proposal. Read More»

EPA regulations for utilities an expensive exercise in futility

Benita Dodd's picture

The federal Environmental Protection Agency was in Atlanta on May 26 to hold a daylong hearing – one of just three nationwide – on its proposed Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) regulations for utilities. The passionate – if sometimes misguided – comments came from representatives of utilities, power plant neighbors, Native Americans, environmental activists, grassroots groups and the Georgia Public Policy Foundation.

The Foundation’s comments focused on three aspects of the proposed MACT rules:

• The cost to industry and consumers in Georgia Read More»

A salute to wonderful fathers is never too late

Dr. David L. Chancey's picture

Our column rotation placed my Father’s Day tribute after the fact this year, but, hey, it’s never too late to salute the dads who are doing a good job with fatherhood, and to challenge all of us to raise our performance even more.

Being a father is a wonderful gift, an awesome privilege. I’ve entered the almost-empty nest stage of life, and would love the turn back the clock just a few years. I loved raising my kids, and tried especially to make many memories and spend much time with them. They say kids spell love t-i-m-e, and would rather have you than any thing you can buy for them. Read More»

Your kids will love this!

Greg Moffatt's picture

If you are a regular reader of this column or if you happen to know me, you won’t believe what I’m about to tell you. You won’t be surprised that in my home I don’t have cable or satellite television, and I haven’t watched a television series in almost 20 years. I don’t text, I don’t play video games, and I rarely recreationally surf the web or use YouTube. I write letters on paper and send them in the US Mail and my children grew up with limited exposure to the television and limited computer use. Read More»

Of names and other things

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

Company is coming and I’m just sitting here looking at a blank screen, wishing something would remind me that I’ve got to get a column or two written before they arrive.

Inspiration doesn’t work that way, however, on demand. Dave says I need to get into the habit of carrying a notebook and jotting down ideas to tap later when a piece is due.

Me, keep up with a pen and pad here in the house? Surely you jest. That would be just one more thing to go missing, along with keys, cell phone, coin purse, ad nauseam.
So. Let’s just go with “stream of consciousness” here. Read More»

A concrete relationship

Rick Ryckeley's picture

The concrete looked nothing like it was supposed to. The huge, gray pile of dust had the consistency of a cornbread mix gone horribly wrong: no eggs, no crackling, and not enough buttermilk. “That’s too much water,” I protested. Sweat had beaded up on my arms and forehead during the first hour as we built the frame. By the end of the second hour, I had hauled twenty or so bags of sand and concrete mix across the church parking lot and started to combine the water, sand, and concrete. Read More»

3D or not 3D?

David Epps's picture

I don’t recall the first movie that I saw in 3-D back in the late 1950s or early 1960s. I am quite certain, however, that it was either a sci-fi flick or a monster movie. What I do recall is the white cardboard “glasses” that had one blue lens and one red lens. For whatever reason, 3-D didn’t stay around all that long. Read More»

Big Media hit bottom with Palin emails

Cal Thomas's picture

If the big media in 2008 had dedicated the resources they are now squandering on Sarah Palin’s emails from when she was governor of Alaska and probed Barack Obama’s background and associations, she might now be vice president of the United States and Obama might still be a junior Illinois senator.

Regardless of what you think of Palin, the vultures attacking her 24,000 pages of emails may represent the most flagrant example of bias since, well, since their attacks on any other Republican. “It could be fun,” said Ken Schwenke of the Los Angeles Times about the email probe. Read More»