Blogs

Once every third day

Rick Ryckeley's picture

Today, as I sit down in front of the computer, I find myself oddly at a loss for words. As a firefighter for over a quarter of a century and a columnist for the last decade, what do I write about, on this the tenth anniversary of 9/11, that hasn’t already been written?

Long before the attacks I was a firefighter, and I was profoundly moved by the events that happened that day as one could imagine. Instantly the public now saw all firefighters as heroes – a heavy burden to carry and even heavier still to live up to. Read More»

A week of anniversaries

David Epps's picture

This has been and will be for me and my family a week of anniversaries.

Last Monday, my wife and I celebrated our 40th wedding anniversary. I referred to the event in church as the “completion of 40 years of a life sentence without parole.”

Guys grinned, women glared: so I guess I am in trouble — again. Read More»

Peachtree City UPDATES - Week of September 6, 2011

Betsy Tyler's picture

September 11 Tribute Concert, City email update, Planning Commission meeting rescheduled, speed limit on Highway 74 South, golf cart reminders, and more . . . Read More»

Peachtree City UPDATES - Week of September 6, 2011

Betsy Tyler's picture

September 11 Tribute Concert, City email update, Planning Commission meeting rescheduled, speed limit on Highway 74 South, golf cart reminders, and more . . . Read More»

Lamenting the death of common sense

Terry Garlock's picture

Some of you would be itching to report me to the PC authorities if you overheard a conversation with my kids about discrimination. It goes something like this:

“I know everyone else says they don’t, but of course I discriminate. I discriminate based on how people behave, not what they look like, not where they came from, not their accent, not which religion they belong to, not who they love. Read More»

What I Will be doing for 9-11

Carolyn Cary's picture

This is what I Will be doing to honor the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11th:

I Will pray for those family members who were left motherless, fatherless, brother-less, sister-less from the deaths of nearly 3,000 people on Sept. 11, 2001.

I Will continue to be a volunteer in my community.

I Will spend the day thinking about all the friends and acquaintances I have lost this year.

I Will pray for the safety of our men and women in military uniform.

I Will pray for those first responders who worked at Ground Zero and now have cancer. Read More»

Here’s a plan that will work; will anybody try it?

Cal Thomas's picture

This will be a stretch for some, but stay with me. Suppose someone presented a plan that is guaranteed to achieve the objectives everyone (or almost everyone serious about such matters) agrees are necessary to create jobs, end our financial dependence on China, reform the tax code and repair Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid so they not only continue to support people now, but ensure the health and welfare of future generations. Read More»

Reagan’s stimulus vs. Obama’s stimulus: one works, one doesn’t

Dr. Paul Kengor's picture

[Editor’s note: A version of this article first appeared in USA Today.]

How ironic that as America debated its debt ceiling all summer and faced a stunning credit downgrade, the nation approached a most timely anniversary: It was Aug. 13, 1981, that President Reagan signed the Economic Recovery Act. Understanding Reagan’s thinking 30 years ago is critical to discerning where we are now. Read More»

Free small businesses from excessive regulations

Kmele Foster's picture

Capitol Hill is inching closer to passing landmark regulatory reform that will help encourage investment and create jobs.

The REINS Act would require that Congress review and approve any new regulation expected to cost more than $100 million. In 2010 alone, despite the weak economy, the Obama administration issued 3,752 new rules — and 224 of them cost more than $100 million. The REINS Act would go a long way toward stemming the tide of costly and regressive regulatory policies coming from Washington. Read More»

The bedroom in a classroom: Clio is not amused

Dr. Jason R. Edwards's picture

Though my mastery of Greek mythology is not strong enough to know off-hand the muse of history’s sexual orientation, I do know that Clio might try to persuade her father to hurl thunderbolts from Mt. Olympus into Sacramento as punishment for defiling her beloved discipline.

The crime?

On July 14, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law SB 48, which dictates that California schools adopt instructional materials in social science classes that emphasize “the role and contributions of ... lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Americans” in history. Read More»

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