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happysad

Michael Boylan's picture

My daughter’s end of kindergarten celebration was this morning. I knew it was going to be rough, emotionally speaking, because my my son’s pre-K graduation, several years ago, was heavy on the theatrics, like a funeral for royalty or a world renowned pop star.

It was designed to show just how much the kids had grown in that one year and it was designed to milk tears out of the parents and teachers. It succeeded. There wasn’t a dry eye in the house.

The kindergarten celebration wasn’t nearly as maudlin or emotionally manipulative, but nobody was going to escape unscathed. Read More»

Memorial Day

David Epps's picture

The Memorial Day weekend is upon us. Memorial Day, according to History.com, is an American holiday observed on the last Monday of May, and honors men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military.

First known as Decoration Day, it originated in the years following the Civil War and became an official federal holiday in 1971.

Many Americans observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries or memorials, holding family gatherings and participating in parades. Unofficially, at least, it marks the beginning of summer. Read More»

Backyard campouts and s’mores

Rick Ryckeley's picture

I grew up in a typical neighborhood with a typical family for the time: a mom, a dad, three brothers, one annoying older sister, and a green parakeet that ate hushpuppies off Dad’s head during dinnertime. His name was Tweet. The parakeet’s, not Dad’s – Dad’s name was James. Read More»

Are you taking a trip or enjoying the journey?

Dr. David L. Chancey's picture

Jesus came to help us live a full and meaningful life that comes from having a personal relationship with Him (John 10:10).

Our lives should be filled with abundance and purpose. We should make every day count. We should live like we’re thankful for every moment. We should enjoy the journey, and not just endure the trip. We should open our eyes to the joy of today.

Max Lucado tells the story about sitting next to a rather interesting lady as he flew one time. He said, “She was rural and I was urban. She was homey and I was professional. But she could see and I was blind. Read More»

The winner? The Government Party

Cal Beverly's picture

The Bible teaches that God, our maker, prefers a humble person over a haughty person. The process of our growing older advances His goal. There are fewer haughty old folks than there are haughty young ones. Age generally introduces one to one’s advancing limitations.

Gray hair in times past has symbolized the hard-won wisdom of experience. A glance in the mirror assures me I should be wiser than I feel.

That’s the background for a confession about choosing and voting for political candidates. Read More»

Endorsing candidates in primary season

Bonnie Willis's picture

You may have noticed that I have been publicly “silent” during this primary season regarding my stance on the various candidates and elections.

That is not to say, however, that I have not given my support through donations and personal volunteer efforts, for, indeed, I have. And it is my personal conviction that one ought to be involved in, or at least be cognizant of the process in which their representatives are being chosen. There is simply too much at stake.

That being said, there are at least three reasons why I have chosen not to voice my opinion on the various primary races. Read More»

The role of senior housing in Fayette’s vision

Vickie Butler's picture

As a member of the Fayette County Visioning Steering Committee, I’ve had the opportunity to lend my voice and support to this county-wide initiative since September 2013.

During my participation in several of the focus groups and community events, I’ve heard time and time again about the growing demographic of the 55+ boomer and mature adult community, and less about housing solutions for attracting more young professionals and their families.

I believe what is needed for counties to attract growth is a commitment to town-center walkable communities. Read More»

Gay rights? Forget free speech

Cal Thomas's picture

Once, Social Security was the “third rail” of politics. Touch it and face political death. Now it is homosexuality. Criticize anything gay people do and you risk ostracism, fines, suspension or loss of your livelihood.

Michael Sam, the first openly gay player to be drafted by a National Football League team — the St. Louis Rams picked him 249th in the last round — is being treated by the media and those in the gay rights movement as the equivalent of an early American pioneer. Read More»

The ultimate sacrifice: Remembering our heroes

Dr. Mark W. Hendrickson's picture

Last year on Memorial Day, my wife, daughter and I were touring Cambridge, England. We took a bus ride three miles out of the city to the U.S. military cemetery there – one of 25 American burial grounds administered by the U.S. government on foreign territory. Cambridge University showed their deep gratitude for their American ally in World War II by donating 30 acres to serve as a final resting place for 3,812 Americans stationed in England who lost their lives in the war. Read More»

America’s civil religion: Presidents and Memorial Day

Dr. Gary Scott Smith's picture

Throughout American history presidents have often used religious rhetoric for various reasons: to provide comfort and consolation, argue that God providentially directs our nation, celebrate our Christian heritage, defend democracy, hold citizens and the country accountable to transcendent standards, help accomplish their own political aims, justify America’s actions, foster traditional morality and justice, promote prayer and Bible reading, call for national and individual repentance, unite Americans, and satisfy citizens’ expectations. Read More»

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