Ronda Rich's blog

Life always evens out

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Among the many things I have learned in this life is how everything evens out, how those who are mighty and rich can become lowly and poor while the lowly and poor can become mighty and rich.

I have seen many examples of both, which often reminds of the truths taught to me by my parents.

“Don’t get above your raisin’,” they intoned often, meaning simply to stay true to who I was, what I was and from where I came. Read More»

Deep fried, Southern style . . .

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A friend of mine returned a call of mine one day while he was sitting in the Dallas airport, waiting for a flight out. He explained that he had just spent two days at the Texas State Fair and it was, he said, quite a sight to behold.

“You wouldn’t believe it. You need to put it on your list of things to do,” he said. “You have never seen so much food in your life. And, get this: they fry everything.”

Hmm. Sounds like my kind of place. “Like what?” I asked.

“They have deep fried battered bacon, fried butter, fried pizza, fried peanut butter. They even have fried Coke.” Read More»

Taking my own advice

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If you’re like me, you probably enjoy handing out advice, both solicited and unsolicited. After all, those of us who have vast life experiences owe it to those with less experience to share our wisdom.

Don’t you agree?

Sometimes I’m asked for advice on that which I have no real knowledge. That doesn’t stop me. I just bluff it and advise based on how I would handle it if it happened to me. Or how I think I would handle it. Trust me, I can talk a mighty good game. Read More»

Unexpected hero found

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Out of curiosity, folks will sometimes ask who is an inspiration or hero to me. Since I rarely think in those terms, I have to stop and think about that answer.

Without fail, I always find that the ones who have inspired me most were common folks with few, if any, uncommon traits or accomplishments. Parents, teachers and others who offered a kind word, encouragement or wisdom when it was most needed are the ones who stand out most in my mind.

But now I have found a hero and from now forward whenever anyone asks that question, I will immediately reply, “Sandy Mary Thompson.” Read More»

Anybody seen a good hair day?

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In looking back at photos, I am left to wonder if I have ever had a truly good hair day. I’m amazed because when I see the snapshots, I think, “Now, I’m sure that when I left home that day, I felt pretty good about my hair. How could it look like that?”

Mama was notorious for grumbling comments about my hair. “You know,” she said on more than one occasion, “I liked you hair a lot better back when you used to comb it.”

Maybe she was right. Read More»

Code of the mountains

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There is a saying among the people of the rural South used to condemn anyone who has changed the terms of an agreement, especially those done with a word and a handshake.

“You went back on your word.” That is not just a comment, it is a curse, for nothing riles the Scotch-Irish more than to have someone renege on their word.

There is a code of conduct that you will find in the Southern mountains that is passed down generation to generation: a handshake agreement stands, your word is your bond, and when you take on one of us, you take on all of us. Read More»

The power of ‘hush’

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A while back, a transplanted Yankee sat down beside me at a luncheon and proceeded to explain what had compelled her to uproot herself from generations of Northern influence and move South.

“I was visiting a friend here and one of her neighbors had stopped by to visit with her 3-year-old in tow,” the woman recalled. “The little girl started to act cranky so her mother leaned down and said softly but firmly, ‘Hush.’ I decided right then and there that I wanted to live here.”

I looked puzzled and tilted my head. “I don’t understand.” Read More»

The power of a thank you note

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When Dixie Dew got a box full of doggie treats from one of her fans, she wagged her tail and jumped around the kitchen, eager to dive into them.

“Now, Dew, you know you’ve got to write a thank you note for these,” I lectured as I permitted her one of the treats.

There was no argument. My child knows that acts of generosity require a hand-written note. We sat down together, she laid her head on my lap and we decided what should be written. Dew is a girl of few words but we got the thoughts down on paper and she signed off with a paw pressed into an ink pad and then stamped on the note. Read More»

Being too sensitive, or not

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You know, it’s beginning to occur to me that I’m not sensitive enough. This is quite a revelation since I spent a goodly amount of my life being told that I was too sensitive. As a child, Mama said that I got my feelings hurt too easily and I needed to snap out of it.

“Stop wearing your heart on your sleeve,” she’d lecture. “Be tough. Let things roll off your back.”

So, I tried. And, apparently, I have done an incredibly good job at tackling my sensitivity. Now, things that seem to bother other people in this politically correct world of ours doesn’t bother me at all. Read More»

Decoded: Sopping & mashing

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Rodney, the reigning patriarch of our family, loves sorghum syrup which, in the mountains, is called “soggum syrup.”

During one Sunday-after-church dinner, Louise had made a batch of hot, buttermilk biscuits so when she offered choices of two desserts, Rodney spoke up and said, “I’ll just have soggum syrup and biscuits.”

Dutifully, like the good wife and hostess she is, she went to the pantry, retrieved a jar that had been bought from some mountaineer at a roadside stand somewhere and handed it to him. Read More»

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