Dr. Mark W. Hendrickson's blog

The ultimate sacrifice: Remembering our heroes

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Last year on Memorial Day, my wife, daughter and I were touring Cambridge, England. We took a bus ride three miles out of the city to the U.S. military cemetery there – one of 25 American burial grounds administered by the U.S. government on foreign territory. Cambridge University showed their deep gratitude for their American ally in World War II by donating 30 acres to serve as a final resting place for 3,812 Americans stationed in England who lost their lives in the war. Read More»

Lunch with Mr. Walters

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Last fall I described the apparently miraculous way in which I located the one person in the world I was searching for — my seventh- and eighth-grade English teacher, Mr. Ted Walters, the man who taught me how to write and think, and thereby launched my professional career.

Now, during Teacher Appreciation Week, I’d like to share with you the story of my happy reunion with Mr. Walters. I hope it encourages you to reconnect with a teacher who made an impact on your life. Read More»

The politics of Paul the apostle

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In Romans 13:1-7 the apostle Paul writes: “[A ruler] is the minister of God to thee for good” (v. 3); “Wherefore ye must needs be subject ...” (v. 5); “... pay ye tribute [taxes]” (v. 6).

St. Paul seems to be saying that God ordains human governments and that Christians should honor and obey the government under whose jurisdiction they live. Read More»

God and Jesus, politics and government

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Is God a Democrat? A Republican? Was Jesus a conservative, liberal, socialist, or libertarian?

Those are jarring questions. Yet, because faith informs one’s values and values inform one’s political leanings, it is understandable why religion and politics often intersect and overlap. Read More»

The war against work and wealth

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[Editor’s note: This article first appeared at Forbes.com.]

The Congressional Budget Office’s recent analysis of the Affordable Care Act concludes that it will result in the equivalent of 2.3 million full-time workers leaving the work force to preserve their taxpayer-financed subsidies for health insurance. Read More»

One of the most powerful Christmas lessons

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[Editor’s note: This article first appeared at Forbes.com.]

The entire country pauses on Dec. 25, as Christians commemorate the birth of Jesus of Nazareth, known to Christians as God’s Christ and Savior, and known to many as The Prince of Peace. Read More»

In my native Detroit, Atlas finally shrugged

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[Editor’s note: This opinion editorial first appeared at Forbes.com.]

I’m sad. Detroit is my native city. It’s decline from being arguably the world’s richest city to being America’s “first Third Word city” is tragic, politically criminal, and a warning to other Americans.

The official declaration of Detroit’s bankruptcy last week could not have come as a surprise to anyone familiar with the Motor City’s atrocious financial condition. Read More»

GOP must grow up on taxes

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[Editor’s note: A version of this article first appeared at Forbes.com.]

Republicans are flailing about these days, trying to rebrand themselves before the next election cycle. A certain amount of introspection and internecine debate is inevitable after suffering a stinging loss against an opponent with a dismal record.

One thing the GOP needs to do to gain greater acceptance among voters is to improve their credibility by outgrowing a tiresome, unthinking opposition to any and all tax increases. Read More»

Reflections on the French election outcome

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[Editor’s note: A version of this article first appeared at Forbes.com.]

The election of Socialist Party candidate Francois Hollande to the presidency of France epitomizes the sorry state of contemporary democracy. By that, I don’t mean to imply that the French people should have voted for the incumbent, Nicolas Sarkozy. Neither would be capable of solving France’s intractable problems in a way acceptable to French voters, nor are the problems with democracy unique to France. To varying degrees they exist throughout Europe as well as here in the United States. Read More»

GOP is a party in fundamental flux

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[Editor’s note: A version of this article first appeared at Forbes.com.]

With Rick Santorum having dropped out of the race, Mitt Romney is apparently the Republican nominee for POTUS, barring a “black swan” event swooping down out of nowhere.

Why has the Republican Party taken so long to decide upon its presidential nominee? The two most common explanations given have been the structure of the primaries and the absence of an “ideal” candidate. Read More»