Paper’s main headline ‘flops’ with reader

Admittedly, I have not read every article in your paper this week. Actually I have only read two so far. I also understand typos are going to occur and I can overlook those OK. What I do have a bit more trouble overlooking are verbal faux pas in the form of misused words.

The most obvious was the headline: “McCarty wins tax flop, Maxwell folds.” Didn’t you mean to say: “McCarty wins tax flap, Maxwell folds”? My wife and I usually have two or three flaps a week, which we usually settle fairly quickly, but we only flop into bed after a particularly exhausting day of keeping our 2-year-old granddaughter.

The second verbal misuse is in Carolyn Cary’s article. She states that Dr. Crawford Long “came up with either.”

My guess is that if he came with “either,” he probably also came up with “or,” but as far as I know he wasn’t a grammarian. Of course, as a doctor, he really came up with neither, because what he came up with was “ether” — an early anesthetic.

From one wordsmith to another, I Just thought I would try to inject a bit of humor into your day, especially since its a very slow day at work. Happy Thanksgiving!

Tom May

Fayetteville, Ga.

[The editor attempts to explain: “Either” the headline — misunderstood by many — was a feeble attempt at a pun referencing a dramatic moment in Texas Hold’em poker (thus the following “fold” by Mr. Maxwell, meaning he tossed in his cards and left the game), or the too-glib editor was himself too benumbed by pre-holiday “ether” to realize that not everybody gets poker terminology. The editor apologizes for the “flap” over a “flop” of a headline.]

Courthouserules
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Flap over a flop

I think most "got" "folds," but not "flop." McCarty wouldn't want to win a flop by Eric!

I have to say though that the headline did denigrate unnecessarily a man who let a written faux pass.

cogitoergofay
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Interesting grammatical

Interesting grammatical discussion....I can't find fault with the Great Editorial One (a/k/a "That Man") on the poker entendre.

I do continue to fail to understand another headline--- from the 1999 election...It was an endorsement that read "Whom not to Vote for...."
(Interesting election....featuring a fiery Op-Ed piece by Sally that popularized the expression "Kosovar Nail Girl").

A former Citizen writer vehemently defended the Editor's use of the word "whom" in that context, but I still don't understand it. It has stayed with me all these years !

Courthouserules
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cogit

Another way of saying who or whom not to vote for is: who you should not vote for. You and who go together! YOUHOO!

But then there is that preposition on the end of the sentence.

cogitoergofay
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CHR--- I'm glad someone feels

CHR--- I'm glad someone feels my pain.

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