PTC saving on roof work, but bubble cost to rise

Peachtree City will be saving a significant amount of money using a new process to repair the roofs of two buildings instead of replacing them.

The $44,880 bid approved Thursday night by the City Council allows for a roof sealing project at the public works administration building and also fire station 82.

The product includes a 10-year warranty and involves the restoration and coating of the roof system. On top of the savings, the city also won’t have to deal with the headache of replacing the building roofs at this time, said Public Works Director Mark Caspar.

Council also learned Thursday that more problems have been discovered at the Kedron pools, where a contractor is installing a new underground anchoring system to support the new bubble enclosure used to keep the pools open in the offseason.

City Engineer David Borkowski told council that as the existing anchoring system is being excavated, there are several situations where water lines are right in the grade beam of the structure. That means an additional cost will be incurred to relocate those water lines away from the anchoring system, he said.

The good news is that the contract included some money to replace water lines because it was foreseen that some would be hit during the excavation, which requires drilling under the pools’ concrete exterior.

Crews also found another defect that will need to be remedied to insure the electrical grounding systems are intact, and as a result the city will be inspecting the electrical work at its other pools to make sure the grounding system is fully functional, Borkowski said.

When the pool was first installed 17 years ago, the building code was a bit different, but since then a certain type of fastener is required to make sure the grounding/bonding linkage between all the metal parts of the pool does not corrode or break down over time.

“We’re probably just seeing again the age of our facilities catching up with us,” Borkowski said.

The good news is that the new bubble fabric and new air return system, which must be manufactured via special order, are on time.

It is not known how much the extra work will cost the city, but those details will be presented to council at a future meeting, officials said.

The costs have already gone up significantly on the bubble, as the city hadn’t planned on replacing the anchoring system, which on top of the winning bid being $96,000 more than expected brought the total cost to $454,000.

The cost is being financed over a 10-year period as part of the revenue bonds approved for sale by council Thursday night.

BHH
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Joined: 02/11/2011
$454,000 would build a mansion

of a metal structure to enclose a very large area.

Why does it have to be a "bubble"?

It doesn't affect me but it seems to me that a completely new facility with all modern systems could have been built for this amount of money.

Robert W. Morgan
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Joined: 10/26/2005
$700,000 is closer to the real cost

The extra work and the interest that will accrue over the 10 years on the bonds will bring it up to $700,000. The good news is that if anyone is interested in figuring out the cost per actual user, $700,000 will be an easy number to divide into. Let's see, 5 swim teams with 10 kids, that's 50 and then add 20 seniors, that's 70 and that's it. 70 divided into $700,000 is -- a lot of money!

Mike King
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Joined: 11/29/2006
RWM

Isn't it funny that when our local government 'saves' us money that the actual costs are far greater than originally stated. If memory serves, PTC was to spend around $250K for a project that the majority of residents could care less about a few scant months ago. The prevailing wisdom then was to close the facility during the winter because the $250K was simply too much in the light of poor economic times, but Council obviously knows far better than those of us who elect them.

It seems now that without any reduction in manpower or spending levels our City Council has given itself the the option of adding another several million dollars in debt we can ill afford to repay. Is it any wonder why one of the largest points of consternation of our Council is the funding of a mere $150K for a development coordinator other than to detract from a much larger and more dire issue?

"There are two ways to enslave a nation-one is by the sword, and the other is by debt"
John Adams