For Fayette, Coweta residents, 9/11 a day to honor heroes

Veterans representing several of America’s wars present arms at the 9/11 Patriot Day observance in Peachtree City Saturday. Photo/Ben Nelms.

More than 200 residents of Fayette and Coweta counties made their way to Falcon Field in Peachtree City last Saturday for the city’s observance of Patriot Day. As in previous occasions, the event was filled with memory and honor and resolve.

The Patriot Day/Freedom Walk began with nearly 200 area residents participating in the “America Supports You Freedom Walk.”

The guest speaker at the event was Bob McCubbins, president of the General Raymond Davis chapter of the Korean War Veterans Association. McCubbins during his brief remarks noted the contribution of America’s veterans is what has often been called “The Forgotten War.”

“There is a lot of lack of knowledge about the Korean War. It’s similar to the lack of information taught in schools in the textbooks,” McCubbins said. “(The soldiers) didn’t choose to be there. They answered the call of our country. History tells us we prevailed, but at a great cost. From Georgia alone there were 740 lost and an estimated two million [Korean] civilians died.”

McCubbins also turned his thoughts to the current war facing America. It is one without borders to cross, one without lines of demarcation.
“In this new age of terror we are the primary target. And our military is still engaged in Afghanistan and Iraq, true patriots all. God bless our patriots and God bless America,” McCubbins said, his voice cracking with emotion that spanned decades as he tried to hold back the tears.

Color guards participating included those from Peachtree City and the Falcon Field Civil Air Patrol Composite Squadron 116. And in what has become a mainstay at local patriotic events, Lindee Link added her voice to the somber occasion.

Always a part of the organization of nearly any patriotic event, Peachtree City Leisure Services Director Randy Gaddo prior to the event spoke about the continuing relevance of Patriot Day.

“Nine years has not dimmed the horrific memories that the world witnessed on that day, when Islamic extremists used commercial aircraft as weapons of mass destruction in New York, Washington, D.C., and Pennsylvania, killing and injuring thousands. In order to ensure remembrance of the lives tragically lost, Patriot Day was declared by Presidential proclamation to be a national day to remember those who died or were injured and their families,” Gaddo said.