3 ‘small’ companies lauded for growth

Despite sour economy, local businesses post big revenue gains

Three Fayette County businesses are among the top 5,000 fastest-growing companies in the country, according to data released by Inc. Magazine.

Sawtst, located in Tyrone, provides information technology engineering, software support and development, logistics and information systems training and testing to the Department of Defense and other federal agencies. The company has added 22 jobs in the past three years and in that time frame its revenue grew from $827,000 a year to $4.8 million, according to Inc.

Another local company on the Inc. list is Peachtree City’s Aventure Aviation, which sells aviation parts and supplies, performs aircraft maintenance and repairs and also maintains and leases aircraft for commercial and military clients worldwide. Aventure added 10 jobs in the past three years, and its revenue more than doubled in that time frame: from $5.4 to $12.2 million, according to Inc. Aventure now employs 19 people.

Both Sawtst and Aventure have been on this prestigious list before. Now they are joined by a relative newcomer: Bimeco Group of Peachtree City, a healthcare company that assesses and represents novel healthcare products, particularly those which provide infection control and create a safe hospital environment for babies, patients, family members and clinicians, according to Inc. The company also represents medical computer developers, medical lighting companies, electronic monitoring devices and headwall equipment manufacturers.

In three years, Bimeco grew from two to 20 employees as its revenue rose from $9.8 million to $13.3 million, according to Inc.

What makes the companies’ feat even more impressive is their ability to grow in a difficult economy, said Matt Forshee, President/CEO of the Fayette County Development Authority. He also noted that each of these businesses had their start on an entrepreneurial basis.

“It’s great for Fayette County to have these kinds of companies here,” Forshee said. “These are all entrepreneurial led companies that were started by people who had vision and kept moving and growing by leaps and bounds every year. So we wish them continued great success.”

Forshee noted that Aventure Aviation is an international company that has made significant headway in helping areas of the world that are underserved from an aviation perspective.
Bimeco’s focus on healthcare has reaped benefits from one of the sectors that is continuing to thrive despite the economy, Forshee noted.

And the military focus of Sawtst is operating in a sector that has remained strong, he added.

PTC Observer
PTC Observer's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/23/2007
AHG - NYTimes

Thanks, but if I have to buy it, I won't read it for a conservative columnist.

FYI, I don't really consider myself a conservative, they attempt to keep things as the socialists have framed them. There is no going back for a conservative, only marching in place until the next socialist take over of the government. The Progressives are winning the war AHG.

PTC Observer
PTC Observer's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/23/2007
Gort - Back

to the top, to get out of single word column land.

I don't deny management's duplicity in the problems at Chrysler, my point is you shoot horses with broken legs, you don't try and race them again.

So, whether we are talking about dependency on the Abrams Tank or unions pressuring for unrealistic global wages and benefits, the government has no business in business. The government does not exist to "save" companies with loan guarantees, or worse loans, it will simply prolong the agony, that's all.

Chrysler and GM are simply going to go out of business, that will happen today if they are left alone, or they will cost taxpayers many more billions of dollars, and then they will go out of business. Government can'r change the laws of economics no matter how it would like to "shape" the vision of tomorrow. Only markets can do this.

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
PTC_0, Japan has very strict

PTC_0, Japan has very strict industrial and energy policies that required automobiles to have very good gas mileage. When the OPEC Oil Embargo hit in the USA, the Japanese companies were able to gain market share in the USA. The companies that benefitted the most were Honda, Toyota, and Datsun (?). American companies rushed into production Vega’s, Pinto’s and Gremlin’s and we know how well that went.

So the strict industrial and energy policies of Japan allowed them to gain market share on the USA. Is this not so?

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
Agreed, Gort...

...and I'm sure their employees are happy they received that support, no matter where it came from. I doubt there's ANY governmental system out there who's members don't hook up a friend, or friend's company (probably after some nice 'donation'!); I'm sure even Chavez has a nice bank account hidden somewhere!

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
Kchief, Chavez may need that

Kchief, Chavez may need that money to get out of town quick some day. 8 - )

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
I wonder how much the government...

...helped these companies? Certainly they didn't build them all on their own, right??!

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
Kchief, actually government

Kchief, actually government has always subsidized aviation, creating an industry that makes companies like Aventure Aviation possible.

According to the article, the Sawtst increase in revenue came from government contracts.

My guess is, Bimeco Group indirectly benefits from Medicaid selling ‘baby monitoring equipment,’ and should do even better if Medicaid is expanded in GA.

I think you got hooked on the sound bite and missed the point the Presidents was trying to make.

Even Mitt Romney used government money to bailout Bain Capital, save the Olympics, and use Tax-Increment Financing to establish those big box retail stores he likes to brag about. Even the building that hosted the Republican Convention was built using taxpayer money.

Funny how Mitt Romney doesn’t like to talk about that stuff, eh? He did it all himself.

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
Noted, Gort...

as yes, I was being a bit cheeky, but subsidizing isn't 'creating an industry', it's supporting an necessary economic activity, like farming, which helps propel the whole economy. Although, it seems Delta did start w/ a gov't grant to crop spray boll weevils when they rapidly spread in 1920's!

As for Sawtst, they provide services/equipment to the DoD based on what they produce; I wonder what % of their business is from other sources? They do appear to be tied up complete w/ Fed contract, per the article.

There certainly are gov't-guided opportunities for some businesses out there. Given the gargantuan size & scope of our gov't, I'm surprised they just don't nationalize everything, so it'll all run smoothly, ya know, like Medicare & the USPS - oh, and Solyndra, too!

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
Kchief, sounds like we pretty

Kchief, sounds like we pretty much agree there is a role for Government to play in commerce. It’s a matter of degree that separates us.

The private sector never offered affordable heath insurance products for seniors and the mail was part of the US Constitution was it not? Companies like Solyndra merely reflect our American entrepreneurial spirit, our willingness to risk capital, and take chances for a better tomorrow, is this not so?

Has there ever been a business or industry the US government truly nationalized?

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
The real problem with US healthcare, Gort...

...is we're so darn good with it, people are living too long! If we'd die at a proper age, we wouldn't need health products for seniors (joking, of course)! Yes, the USPS was established by Congress, as was the Army - both, in many instances, show how mega-bureacracies can be mega-dysfunctional. Much like ill-advised mega-loans by our gov't to speculative industries, our gov't makes some really stupid decisions with OUR money.

What I've found about U.S. 'nationalizations':
1862: The Legal Tender Act nationalized the monetary system under fiat currency.
1863: The National Bank Act nationalized the banking system and further monopolized the money supply.
1917: All U.S. railroads were nationalized as the Railroad Administration during World War I as a wartime measure. The United States Railroad Administration was returned to private ownership in 1920.
1939: Organization of the Tennessee Valley Authority entailed the nationalization of the facilities of the former Tennessee Electric Power Company.
1971: The National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) is a government-owned corporation created in 1971 for the express purpose of relieving American railroads of their legal obligation to provide inter-city passenger rail service. The (primarily) freight railroads had petitioned to abandon passenger service repeatedly in the decades leading up to Amtrak's formation.
1976: The Consolidated Rail Corporation (Conrail), another government corporation, was created to take over the operations of six bankrupt rail lines operating primarily in the Northeast; Conrail was privatized in 1987. Initial plans for Conrail would have made it a truly nationalized system like that during World War I, but an alternate proposal by the Association of American Railroads won out.
1980s: Resolution Trust Corporation seized control of hundreds of failed Savings & Loans.
2001: In response to the September 11 attacks, the then-private airport security industry was nationalized and put under the authority of the Transportation Security Administration.
2008: Some economists consider the U.S. government's takeover of the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation and Federal National Mortgage Association to have been nationalization (or renationalization).[28][29] The conservatorship model used with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac is looser and more temporary than nationalization.

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
Kchief, did you notice that

Kchief, did you notice that Obama had nothing to do with any of the nationalization in your post. Most were done because of the necessity of war or the collapse of the industry.

The TVA is by far the most interesting to me. Before and after the war it was savaged by its critics but it sure earned it’s keep during the war providing electric power that helped lead to development of the atomic bomb.

My father in law was a Marine in the Pacific theater during WW2 and was very happy the US didn’t have to invade mainland Japan. When he returned home from the Marines he married and had four children. His second child would later become my wife. Thank you TVA.

It’s true that some loans don’t bring a return on investment but nobody has ever showed me government screws up any more or less then private enterprise.

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
The only difference is, Gort...

...when private enterprise screws up, they lose THEIR money (or investors) and go out of business; the government can just try again since they use PUBLIC money. That's quite a significant difference.

I don't think I mentioned Obama in that post. Since you brought him up, and atomic bombs, didn't he try to apologize for their use when he last visited there, but the Japs stopped him?

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
Kchief, I don’t think it’s as

Kchief, I don’t think it’s as simple as you say for large companies or companies that dominate a geographic area. For instance, if GM was allowed to go bankrupt and dissolved, it would have taken another million jobs, pensions, health insurance, and hundreds of other companies with thousands of its investors, employee’s, pensions, health insurance with it as well. They are not risking just their money.

There is a lot of right wing hype about what Obama says or does. It’s usually an exaggeration or outright lie.

http://mediamatters.org/research/2011/10/13/right-wing-media-hype-false-...

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
Nothing is ever so simple, Gort...

...agreed, but that's the risk for all; there are no guarantees for anybody. It is quite a quandry as to why some get gov't help and others not, but in this case it seems to be helping: 'GM and Chrysler have restructured, shedding debt, slashing labor costs and returning to profitability. Ford's balance sheet has improved as well; according to Mulally (Ford CEO), the company has repaid more than $21 billion of the $23.5 billion it borrowed to get through the downturn.' (Prior to the last bailout)

And again, Obama's attempt to apologize to the Japs for Truman's decision not to sacrifice 1 million lives invading Japan? Right/wrong, in your opinion?

S. Lindsey
S. Lindsey's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/2008
Uh no...

GM would have been able to re-organize lose those Union contracts and re-negotiate for a better economic profile.

Companies do this all the time Gort and they don't necessarily close their doors. Most actually thrive afterwards. They become leaner and more efficient. The Company I used to work for with 3500 employees Worldwide did it and came out stronger and leaner and took a larger market share.

Those suppliers would have re-tooled and started supplying parts to the other markets like Kia, Ford, Chrysler and other US based interest. As it is once again GM is falling down the hole and in another 2 years will be up for filing bankruptcy again and there will not be a safety net to catch them again.

Oh and btw- You use "Media Matters" and talk about Right Wing hype...??? I know you just didn't do that. That is all MM is a Soros spin machine for the progressive party.

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
SLindsey, oh really, do you

SLindsey, oh really, do you think they would have come back as strong as our textile mills did in the South after they closed down? I do.

BTW, you pick your websites, I’ll pick mine.

S. Lindsey
S. Lindsey's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/2008
You may pick your websites all you want...

Just expect to be called on it when you use biased sites.

I suppose I could start using Redstate.com you would not mind would you?

The Government should not have got involved and used our money to do it.. Gort PERIOD.

That is described as Crony Capitalism a form of Socialist Democracy. Something we are not...Yet.

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
SLindsey, you would say

SLindsey, you would say anything to avoid answering the question. You sound just like Romney and Ryan on the campaign trail.

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
But yet, Gort, you've avoided...

...answering my 2-time asked question 'do you support Obama's attempt to apologize to the Japanese for dropping A-bombs on them'? You were previously so adamant that dropping them was a good thing; to quote: "My father in law was a Marine in the Pacific theater during WW2 and was very happy the US didn’t have to invade mainland Japan."

mudcat
mudcat's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/26/2005
This is the right President to apologize to the Japanese

if we are actually going to do it, that is. Terrible idea, but if Obama does it, all future Presidents can just shrug it off and say he was a maverick marching to his own drummer. My uncle, a Marine fought on Iwo Jima and a couple of other islands and was part of that huge troop buildup who were certain they would be attacking mainland Japan with far more many casualties than D-Day. They expected complete resistance from both military and civilians. Those bombs probably saved 10 times more America and Japanese lives than they took. That's the problem with teaching alternative history in public schools, Obama and others don't understand this background.

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
Kchief, not clear what you

Kchief, not clear what you wanted from me on the auto-bailout, however, I’ll offer you this.

President Reagan did the first Chrysler auto-bailout. That sounds to me like a precedent was already set.

Ford, (and all other auto makers,) did benefit from the government ‘cash for clunker’ program.

The reason there was a bailout at all was because the country could not afford to loose a million more jobs at a time when major banks couldn't do more than keep themselves from going bust and the US was already loosing 750k jobs a month.

If I didn’t make myself clear, I don’t believe the assertion that Obama ever intended to apologize to the Japanese for anything.

PTC Observer
PTC Observer's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/23/2007
Gort - Slight

correction to "President Reagan did the first Chrysler auto-bailout"

Congress passed a bill for a loan guarantee, they did not offer money to the auto manufacturer.

Either way it was wrong headed for them to do this as was the latest insertion of the government into the markets for a whole list of things like autos and green initiated programs . It simply poisons markets and was the reason for the housing collapse.

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
PTC_0, lets not quibble over

PTC_0, lets not quibble over the details, the government co-signed the loan and investment banks were in good enough shape to make the loans. The investment banks trusted the government more than the free market.

PTC Observer
PTC Observer's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/23/2007
Gort - Correct

Investment banks trusted the idea that the people could be forced to come up with the money (taxes) for a company gone bad by union contracts guaranteeing wages far above the average American laborer. Banks had no confidence that the company could be successful in re-negotiating those contracts and come out of it profitable.

In the long run, the company couldn't, it eventually went bankrupt. Decades later, the people were on the hook as investors in a very sick company. Eventually they lost over $1.5 Billion because of their "investment" went down over 30%.

You're correct on this, the power of the government to tax its people to use as it sees fit is a much greater power than free markets, that is simply because it is force and not free.

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
PTC_0, gone bad by union

PTC_0, gone bad by union contracts? The union guys just assemble the cars, they can’t be blamed for the crummy designs and quality control that come out of the marketing and engineering departments.

That’s a management problem, upper management is picked by the board of directors, the board of directors represents the shareholders, and the shareholders elect the board of directors, (in theory,) so if the company went bust the stockholders can blame themselves.

Instead they point the finger at the rank and file workers? What a bunch of weasels.

PTC Observer
PTC Observer's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/23/2007
Gort - All

true, but the straws that broke the camel's back were union wages and benefits. You're right though it takes a lot of cooperation, talent, skill and creativity to build a modern automobile. Problem is that most American companies have forgotten how to do this. Not to worry, the government will make sure that even poor car companies can "survive" by forcing taxpayers to bail them out. That would by your money Gort.

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
PTC_0, if we’re still talking

PTC_0, if we’re still talking about the first bailout, Chrysler made bad cars, they didn’t have products for the post Arab Oil Embargo, and they hadn’t retooled since WW2. Even if the unions worked for free, management would have been content with milking the company’s assets.

At the time of the first bailout, I think Chrysler was a defense contractor. Didn't they develop the M1 Abrams? Chrysler management learned lazy from being part of the military industrial complex is my guess.

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
Here's a fine union example, PTCO...

Concerning the Chicago teachers' strike:

The coverage of the strike has obscured some basic facts. The money has continued to pour into Chicago’s failing public schools in recent years. Chicago teachers have the highest average salary of any city at $76,000 a year before benefits. The average family in the city only earns $47,000 a year. Yet the teachers rejected a 16 percent salary increase over four years at a time when most families are not getting any raises or are looking for work.

The city is being bled dry by the exorbitant benefits packages negotiated by previous elected officials. Teachers pay only 3 percent of their health-care costs and out of every new dollar set aside for public education in Illinois in the last five years, a full 71 cents has gone to teacher retirement costs.

Just 15 percent of fourth graders are proficient in reading and only 56 percent of students who enter their freshman year of high school wind up graduating.

Of course, for those rich Republicans...oh, wait, he's not...
'Mayor Rahm Emanuel has decided to send his three children to the University of Chicago Lab Schools rather than put them in the financially strapped Chicago Public Schools he’s trying desperately to reform.' In a prepared statement, Chicago Teachers Union President Karen Lewis was careful not to criticize Emanuel’s decision to send his kids to one of the city’s most elite private schools.

PTC Observer
PTC Observer's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/23/2007
Interesting stats - KCChief

Can you provide your source? DM has posted something out of the NY Times.....true to form I suppose, no bias there at all.

Davids mom
Davids mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/30/2005
PTCO

The article from the NY Times doesn't necessarily contradict what has been discussed - but just gives a different slant for the future treatment of teachers and education in the US.

PTC Observer
PTC Observer's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/23/2007
Sorry DM,

I don't read The New York Times, but I think it's a great way to wrap fish.

AtHomeGym
AtHomeGym's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/18/2007
PTC-O & NYT

You might try reading David Brooks--he is about the only conservative voice there.

Davids mom
Davids mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/30/2005
PTCO

To stay on top of things, it's always wise to know what the perceived enemy is thinking. Just sayin'.

PTC Observer
PTC Observer's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/23/2007
But DM

what they think never changes.

Davids mom
Davids mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/30/2005
Never

Is a long time. ( Germany -Japan - Russia). Why at one time we were even 'friends' with Persia ( Iran)!

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
Sure, PTCO...

Here's my source:

http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/316395/chicago-bled-dry-striking-te...

And, yes, it's the National Review, but one would hope the numbers are valid.

PTC Observer
PTC Observer's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/23/2007
Thanks Chief

The numbers based on results alone and the fact the the current mayor is trying to fix things says tons about how bad it is there.

PTC Observer
PTC Observer's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/23/2007
Duplicate

*

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
Kchief, I don’t know if

Kchief, I don’t know if that’s a good example or not. I don’t know much about it and would hate to jump to a conclusion!

I will comment on the salary differential. Generally speaking, my guess is the average education level for teachers is higher than that of the general public in Chicago.

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
Sadly, Gort...

...if on 56% or so actually graduate, and the young'ens barely read well early on, I would hope the teachers, themselves, have a higher education than the 'general public'!

Davids mom
Davids mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/30/2005
The cost of low teacher salaries

This article puts a slightly different slant on the conversation about teacher salaries.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/01/opinion/01eggers.html

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
Yes, DM, it is slanted...

...as who can argue about not paying teacher enough? It is an important and tough job; it was for the short time I did it (BS Ed, 1985). No one ever told me I'd get rich, but it was laid out that I could 'move up' in education by continuing my education and earn a fairly decent living. I didn't see any discussion of that in the Op-Ed piece. Education, like any career, has its place on qualification requirements, performance goals & ratings, etc... I don't see where anyone is 'blaming' teachers for poor student performance, as it takes more involvement than just a teacher to get children to their peak performance. Btw, some - for the same reasons in reverse - never will. The piece's logic compares apples to oranges, esp. when you consider 50+ state approaches to 1 Federal approach; it's a stupid comparison.

The Chicago issue is pure and simple union greed. If they strong-arm the city for more, the union staffers get more. If the figures I presented are even close, then that 4-year BS in Ed teacher is doing just fine, but that assumes a lot, of course.

Davids mom
Davids mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/30/2005
KC

Congratulations on getting your BS in 1985. This article is not really about the situation in Chicago - but looking forward to the treatment of teachers:

Note:

Quote:

WHEN we don’t get the results we want in our military endeavors, we don’t blame the soldiers. We don’t say, “It’s these lazy soldiers and their bloated benefits plans! That’s why we haven’t done better in Afghanistan!” No, if the results aren’t there, we blame the planners. We blame the generals, the secretary of defense, the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
No one contemplates blaming the men and women fighting every day in the trenches for little pay and scant recognition.
And yet in education we do just that. When we don’t like the way our students score on international standardized tests, we blame the teachers. When we don’t like the way particular schools perform, we blame the teachers and restrict their resources.
Compare this with our approach to our military: when results on the ground are not what we hoped, we think of ways to better support soldiers. We try to give them better tools, better weapons, better protection, better training. And when recruiting is down, we offer incentives.
We have a rare chance now, with many teachers near retirement, to prove we’re serious about education. The first step is to make the teaching profession more attractive to college graduates. This will take some doing.

Prospective teachers need to learn what you found out - that teaching is not easy. The training should be more realistic; teachers/educators should have the best 'tools'; better protection; better incentives for improving their skills. I wouldn't want a doctor to operate on me with only 4 or 5 years of education and little actual experience. We allow our teachers to do that with our most precious commodity - our children's minds. A brand new teacher - with only a year of student teaching is not the same as a seasoned teacher with outstanding skills. Anyway - this article wouldn't change anyone's mind about the current situation in Chicago - but may plant some seed for future treatment/recruitment of teachers. We should have the top college graduates in our classrooms like some other countries.

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
Agreed, DM...

...it is straight into the fire once you secure that first job. Your tenured peers are helpful, but it's all you behind the desk once the bell rings! At the very least we had to qualify for a teaching certificate, but I understand many states don't operate that way, or didn't anyway, for the longest time. IMHO, where you have the greatest involvement by parents - not just in school activities but at HOME - you have the greatest success with students.

Davids mom
Davids mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/30/2005
Fayette County/Parents KC

Parent involvement has kept Fayette County at the top of the heap! Fayette County seniors scored above average in Georgia and the nation on the SAT. Only a teacher knows how tough that 'fire' can be in the classroom - not physically necessarily, but a teachers job is to provide information in such a way that an average child will be able to use it to solve problems and analyze situations. Measurement of success is the SAT score; the ability of the child to contribute to society; (not all students go to or finish college) - but all students should graduate from high school with the tools to contribute. Other countries where students are outperforming our students have a tremendous respect for teachers - and provides them with the support that the job demands. It may take several years - but the position of teacher in this country needs to be considered a profession of respect in all communities - and the BEST COLLEGE GRADUATES need to be in the classroom guiding our future. I remember when attorneys were having trouble getting work, many were interviewing for teaching jobs - with their law degree and their own school attendance as their experience. I hired one. She didn't make it. I watch Law and Order religiously - and graduated from college - but I wouldn't be able to make it in the courtroom with only that knowledge. Fortunately, I came along (in the 50's) when we not only received demanding academic training - but spent two years participating in a classroom working under the direct guidance of a master teacher. Even then, when that door closed on my first classroom with me and 35 kids - my heart did a LEAP!.. Fortunately, i had OVERPLANNED - and had many, many activities and lessons - and whew! - the day went smoothly. It taught me that I had to be planned and ready EVERY DAY - which required lots of work at home in the evening and on weekends. Good teachers should be treasured!

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
You are very right, DM...

...and like so many young people, armed with their 'vast' experience of 4 years of college - in any field - jump into the work world and try to make their way; some will, some won't. Unfortunately, many of the 'best' (and qualifying that means different things to different people, not just a high GPA!) college grads look to more lucrative fields; I don't know if we'll ever have enough 'good' teachers to go around, hence the need for parents to vest themselves heavily in their children and not depend on JUST the public school system.

Davids mom
Davids mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/30/2005
KC

Yup!

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
My quick research, Gort...

...reported on several websites, in prelim discussions w/ Japanese officials about Obama's upcoming trip, stated the Japs nixed his planned apology (more than just Fox News website); feel free to look it up.

I think the auto bailout discussion was about the industries & unions that demand Federal support as whole regions were/are dependent on them. It's where free market & enterprise ends and socialism begins, more or less - good or bad, we'll see.

IRISH set to stomp the Boilermakers today - home opener!!!

Davids mom
Davids mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/30/2005
Fox News Recants? Japan Apology
kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
Sounds like it was a misunderstanding, DM...

...between gov'ts; thanks for the update. The link to the actual cable between gov'ts wouldn't open on your muckraker site; I'll try to find it.

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
Kchief, I never heard of the

Kchief, I never heard of the so called apology to Japan before you mentioned it and I looked it up at that time. My conclusion is still, I don’t believe the assertion that Obama ever intended to apologize to the Japanese for anything.

I constantly hear people around here rage against crony capitalism when it comes to American auto companies. I never see any outrage about government intervention and financial considerations with say, Kia, Sany, NCR, Cooper and virtually all the big box retail stores. In Georgia, we have a utility company given authority to tax people to build a nuclear power plant for the shareholders.

Is there such a thing as good and bad crony capitalism? Who picks what’s good or bad?

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
My guess, Gort...

...is whomsoever is in power. Do the companies you mention need government intervention?

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
Kchief, I’m no fan of crony

Kchief, I’m no fan of crony capitalism but I realize it’s a fact of life. The companies I mentioned must have thought so and I never heard them complain about getting too much.

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
SLindsey, you would say

SLindsey, you would say anything to avoid answering the question. You sound just like Romney and Ryan on the campaign trail.

S. Lindsey
S. Lindsey's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/2008
Gort your question makes little sense...

...because it is irrelevant to the discussion.

Crony Capitalism is wrong no matter which party is in power.. Government should not be in the business of picking and choosing winners.

Would GM have come back? I suppose we will never know since Government decided to intervene...

btw-any more choice tidbits from Media Matters today? How many people has Romney and Ryan killed today according to them?

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
SLindsey, you’re a fine one

SLindsey, you’re a fine one to bellyache about ‘crony capitalism.’ Don’t you run an environmental company? You wouldn’t even have an industry to work in if it wasn’t for the EPA.

8 - )

S. Lindsey
S. Lindsey's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/2008
I am just the Tool supplier gort...

...not the author of the Blueprints.

I work based on the rules that are given... Now if I was too "big to fail" and the Government decided I should win the taxpayer lottery and bail me out and then I used those rules to enrich my self and my company, well now gort, I would be a good example of GM.

btw- Why do we need the EPA when each State already has an Agency for that... so just another Taxpayer subsidized bureaucracy. You should love that.

MYTMITE
MYTMITE's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/14/2008
JOBS, JOBS, JOBS, GM creating 1,000 jobs. Only problem is

these jobs are in Mexico! In Q&A on the news in todays AJC in reply to an inquiry: "GM is spending $420 million on projects in Mexico, including $120 million on a plant to build the Chevrolet Trax, a SUV crossover that will be sold in 140 countries but not the U.S. Reuter's reported. Chevrolet is also expected to begin building the next generation of pick-ups at another plant in Mexico in 2013. GM's investiment in the country would create 1,000 job, per the article. Ford has begun construction on a ONE BILLION DOLLAR plant in India that will begin producing cars in 2014."

Maybe our unemployed auto workers can sneak over the border to land some of these jobs. Wonder how much of our tax money is behind this?? Don't it make you feel great??

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
MTM, I don’t think you can

MTM, I don’t think you can blame sending jobs out of the county on GM rank and file workers. The India investment is probably the price GM has to pay to gain access to that market.

I do agree American workers would not like working at any American company in Mexico. I hear people that work in those factories live in cardboard boxes so they can save enough money so they can come to the USA and cut grass in places like Peachtree City.

8 -)

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
Probably a market move, MYTMITE...

...as the burgeoning world population is catching up w/ the American way of life and cars are becoming a desirable status symbol in other countries, too, so companies are expanding their oveaseas operations. Mexico, of course, is cheap labor and no unions, no tariffs; many companies operate their due to these reasons.

G35 Dude
G35 Dude's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/15/2006
kccheif-Charity should start at home.
Quote:

Probably a market move, MYTMITE...

...as the burgeoning world population is catching up w/ the American way of life and cars are becoming a desirable status symbol in other countries, too, so companies are expanding their oveaseas operations. Mexico, of course, is cheap labor and no unions, no tariffs; many companies operate their due to these reasons.

That's fine KC. Or it would be if these were the countries that gave GM a bailout. They might not even exist if not for the assistance they got from the American people. Don't you think they owe it to us to do more here?

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
Business is business, G35...

...not charity. Both GM & Ford see these (proven) market opportunities and would be foolish not to compete there, both for the company's & stockholders (US citizens) sake.

Btw, if your screen name suggest you drive an Infiniti G35, exactly where do the profits from that sale go to? Maybe the JAPANESE automaker Nissan Motor Company?

MYTMITE
MYTMITE's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/14/2008
Yep, KCCA, business is business and not charity, that is why I

was against the bailout. If you, as a small business owner, ran your business inefficiently and produced an inferior product, would the governement bail you out? Should they? Heck no. To add insult to injury, not only did GM get a huge bailout but then they used our money to build new auto plants in foreign countries. If they had built this plant in the US there would have been the purchase of the land, purchase of materials to build and equip the plant, use of utilities(water, gas, electric, etc), paychecks going to American workers which in turn would have boosted sales of homes, autos, foods products etc. and there would or should have been a Tax base. All of this would have aided our country and at least made the bail out more palatable. But GM chose to show their appreciation for our assistance by thumbing their nose at us. So much for 'charity".

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
You are correct, MYTMITE...

...and for every one of those $$ spent, the unions would rake in that much more. Get rid of UAW and you'd see a lot more profits, MUCH less overhead, and in turn, more 'local' economic investment. And again, making $$ is how businesses work, and even with 'our' $$, ignoring the growing foreign markets would be stupid. They need to pay us back somehow, right?

G35 Dude
G35 Dude's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/15/2006
Yes KC

Yep it is an Infinity. You will notice that I did not attack Ford or Infinity in my post as neither took money from the American people. And to me the bailout was charity.

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
You'll see, G35...

...that Ford DID take a $23.5 billion loan from Uncle Sam in 2006. To their credit, they've paid back $21 billion thus far. So, they're not innocent in needing the Feds help! The bailout truly was charity - for the UAW. As for Infinity, I'll tell you what I tell my neighbor who drives a Tundra - 'the Emperor of Japan thanks you for your business'! ;-)

G35 Dude
G35 Dude's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/15/2006
KC-Are you saying

I should have bought an inferior product that was probably made in Mexico?

kcchiefandy
kcchiefandy's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/18/2009
If you want to support the American worker, G35...

...then yes. If not, then no. American manufacturing is obviously in decline, a vestige of our great past. Perhaps technology and the service sector can someday replace it, but for the unskilled/semi-skilled worker, the future is not bright here in the US.

MYTMITE
MYTMITE's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/14/2008
KCCA, I drove "American made" cars until the quality got bad.

When you purchase a new car which becomes a piece of junk after less than six months and the company acknowledges there are problems but refuses to make them better, then it is time to make a change. I did, I bought my first Honda Accord which was made in Maryville, TN by American workers. I drove that first Honda for ten years then passed it on to my granddaughter who drove it back and forth to college for the next four years and she drove it hard. After college she sold it for a nice hunk of change--great resale value. My next Honda Hurricane Andrew did a number on and I still drove it for three years and then traded it in on a '94 Accord in '93. This vehicle was also made in Maryville, TN by American workers. I am still driving it and will until it or I give up the ghost and there is a good chance I will go before it does. I have people waiting in line to buy this 19 year old car from me even tho I have no desire to sell it. Except for preventitive maintenance (and I am pretty slack about that) I have not had to put a penny into this vehicle. So, under those circumstances, what would you do??? Buy a piece of junk from a company that refuses to stand behind it's product and take a huge loss in order to have safe dependable transportation or go with a proven product that, like the Energizer Bunny, keeps going and going and going and----

AtHomeGym
AtHomeGym's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/18/2007
KCAndy & Japanese Cars

When Consumer Reports selects best 3 vehicle Manufacturers in the World as Toyota, Subaru, & Mazda--then it's not too hard to understand why they sell lots of vehicles here

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
AHG and G35, Toyota, Subaru,

AHG and G35, Toyota, Subaru, and Mazda are all union shops in the home country of Japan. G35 doesn’t support unions in the USA but he supports them in Japan.

G35 Dude
G35 Dude's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/15/2006
Gort- Who said anything about Unions?

Gort, I simply buy the best product that I can for the money that I have. I can't afford to buy an inferior car whether it was made in Mexico by an "American Company" or Japan by a Japanese company.

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
G35, I think SLindsey started

G35, I think SLindsey started up on the unions, Kchief jumped in, I responded, you quoted Kchief, on and on it goes, where it stops no one knows! Isn't that why we post?

BTW, the G35 is by all accounts a fine automobile. Do you think Nissan benefits from the industrial policies of the Japanese government?

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
SLindsey, oh yeah, you’re a

SLindsey, oh yeah, you’re a ‘Tool’ all right. 8 - )

BTW, aside from the fact that states pass regulations for activity within its borders, federal oversight is needed for activities dealing with interstate activities. Besides so many states would just neglect their responsibility, the Federal EPA is forced into the role as policeman.

S. Lindsey
S. Lindsey's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/2008
If a business disposes of a product incorrectly..

...in Atlanta what role does the Federal Government play when it comes to Interstate "activities"?

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
SLindsey, no I don’t but it

SLindsey, no I don’t but it sounds interesting. Would you tell me?

Gort
Gort's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2009
SLindsey, no I don’t but it

SLindsey, no I don’t but it sounds interesting. Would you tell me?

S. Lindsey
S. Lindsey's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/2008
Yep I will share...

... the answer is NONE.. but because of Federal Regulations which overlap into the State's jurisdiction they can do anything they want.

Why do we need an EPA?

rolling stone
rolling stone's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/08/2012
S. Lindsey
Quote:

Why do we need an EPA?

One obvious reason is that air and water pollution do not stop at state borders, states' rights be dammed.

Git Real
Git Real's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/17/2006
States Rights Be Damned????

Sometimes you scare me Basmati / Sniffles.....

rolling stone
rolling stone's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/08/2012
Git Real re: states' rights

I was referring to air and water pollution in this instance, and this is not Basmati/Sniffles. I am just a simple tan man of little ego.

Git Real
Git Real's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/17/2006
Hey Simple Tan Man.....

Well....ya sure sound like him.... Good to meetcha. I am a simple white man..... Not that it matters.

So tromping states rights is okay with you as long as it favors your pet agendas?

rolling stone
rolling stone's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/08/2012
Hey Git Real..a short answer....
Quote:

So tromping states rights is okay with you as long as it favors your pet agendas?

Yes, if it adversely affects the "United" of the "United States". When it comes to the environment political borders have no effect.

Larry Sussberg
Larry Sussberg's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/12/2009
.

..

Recent Comments