Numbers add up for Carol Taylor

Numbers add up for Carol Taylor

Rising Starr Middle School eighth-grade math teacher Carol Taylor (R) was honored July 16 by Fayette County Board of Education members including Marion Key (center) and Bob Todd (R) after she received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science. Taylor recently returned from a trip to Washington, D.C., where she was one of 108 recipients of the award. Photo/Ben Nelms.

mercyme
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Award not deserved IMHO

What makes a great teacher? Teaching is one of the most complicated jobs today. It demands broad knowledge of subject matter, curriculum and standards; enthusiasm, a caring attitude and a love of learning; knowledge of discipline and classroom management techniques; and a desire to make a difference in the lives of young people.

They expect that all students can and will achieve in their classroom, and they don't give up on underachievers.

They ask questions frequently to make sure students are following along. They try to engage the whole class, and they don't allow a few students to dominate the class.

Great teachers are warm, accessible, enthusiastic and caring. Teachers with these qualities are known to stay after school and make themselves available to students and parents who need them.

Great teachers form strong relationships with their students and show that they care about them as people.

Great teachers communicate frequently with parents. They reach parents through conferences and frequent written reports home. They don't hesitate to pick up the telephone to call a parent if they are concerned about a student.

My child had Dr. Taylor for math and I can tell you from personal experience that she does not possess most of the above qualities. My child is extremely bright (which is how one ends up in her class) but struggled with mathematics. This teacher was stern, stand-offish and cold. The expectation was that you should be able to keep up or you didn't belong and she couldn't be bothered with you -- end of story. There was no reaching out to assist; no compassion for my child's struggles; and no effort made on the part of the teacher to get to the root of the problem. When my child tried to go in before or after school for extra help, Dr. Taylor didn't even look up from her desk and shooed my child away. By the end of the first quarter, my child was so turned off by this teacher that she didn't even WANT to try any more. I never saw as many tears shed at home as I did over this teacher. Attending math class became a dreaded chore and it was agony just trying to get through the year. I did request a parent-teacher conference where I experienced exactly what my child had been complaining about, as I received the same treatment (cold and stand-offish). My concerns over my child were brushed aside by a very haughty, look-down-your-nose-at-others demeanor.

How in the world this woman ended up with this award and the spotlight on her is a huge mystery to me. Obviously the people bestowing the accolades are people who have never spent time in her classroom OR had a child who did.

Take this with a grain of salt, people... there are MUCH better teachers all over the place out there who go unrecognized. It would have been much better to give this recognition to someone who is actually encouraging learning and changing lives; not someone who has a lot of letters after her name.

I'm sure I'll get some criticism for posting this here but I just had to get this off my chest. When your child DOES get a teacher who is compassionate and caring, make sure you let the teacher know; for they may not draw the attention of the 'right' people and may never be publicly acknowledged.

AtHomeGym
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mercyme & award

I'm betting you don't know the criteria for selection for this award--I know I don't. Regardless, your beef is with the selection committee--send them your personal whine and see what that does for you!

AtHomeGym
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mercyme & award

I'm betting you don't know the criteria for selection for this award--I know I don't. Regardless, your beef is with the selection committee--send them your personal whine and see what that does for you!

mercyme
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Joined: 06/09/2008
Award not deserved IMHO

What makes a great teacher? Teaching is one of the most complicated jobs today. It demands broad knowledge of subject matter, curriculum and standards; enthusiasm, a caring attitude and a love of learning; knowledge of discipline and classroom management techniques; and a desire to make a difference in the lives of young people.

They expect that all students can and will achieve in their classroom, and they don't give up on underachievers.

They ask questions frequently to make sure students are following along. They try to engage the whole class, and they don't allow a few students to dominate the class.

Great teachers are warm, accessible, enthusiastic and caring. Teachers with these qualities are known to stay after school and make themselves available to students and parents who need them.

Great teachers form strong relationships with their students and show that they care about them as people.

Great teachers communicate frequently with parents. They reach parents through conferences and frequent written reports home. They don't hesitate to pick up the telephone to call a parent if they are concerned about a student.

My child had Dr. Taylor for math and I can tell you from personal experience that she does not possess most of the above qualities. My child is extremely bright (which is how one ends up in her class) but struggled with mathematics. This teacher was stern, stand-offish and cold. The expectation was that you should be able to keep up or you didn't belong and she couldn't be bothered with you -- end of story. There was no reaching out to assist; no compassion for my child's struggles; and no effort made on the part of the teacher to get to the root of the problem. When my child tried to go in before or after school for extra help, Dr. Taylor didn't even look up from her desk and shooed my child away. By the end of the first quarter, my child was so turned off by this teacher that she didn't even WANT to try any more. I never saw as many tears shed at home as I did over this teacher. Attending math class became a dreaded chore and it was agony just trying to get through the year. I did request a parent-teacher conference where I experienced exactly what my child had been complaining about, as I received the same treatment (cold and stand-offish). My concerns over my child were brushed aside by a very haughty, look-down-your-nose-at-others demeanor.

How in the world this woman ended up with this award and the spotlight on her is a huge mystery to me. Obviously the people bestowing the accolades are people who have never spent time in her classroom OR had a child who did.

Take this with a grain of salt, people... there are MUCH better teachers all over the place out there who go unrecognized. It would have been much better to give this recognition to someone who is actually encouraging learning and changing lives; not someone who has a lot of letters after her name.

I'm sure I'll get some criticism for posting this here but I just had to get this off my chest. When your child DOES get a teacher who is compassionate and caring, make sure you let the teacher know; for they may not draw the attention of the 'right' people and may never be publicly acknowledged.

rolling stone
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Well you know it doesn't come easy
Quote:

How in the world this woman ended up with this award and the spotlight on her is a huge mystery to me.

The answer to that inquiry can be found on the paemst.org website.

rolling stone
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