On amnesty, our legislators should repeat 2006, not 1986

As happened in 2006, amnesty has passed the Senate again.

The future of American sovereignty, security and employment access is now up to the U.S. House of Representatives, in which members must face re-election every two years.

Home on a July 4th break and gauging public resistance to another amnesty, the House GOP will meet on July 10 back in Washington to compare notes and decide how, or even if, to handle promises of future immigration enforcement.

Will the Republican-controlled House also capitulate to the amnesty coalition led by big business? We’ll see.

Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) claims that a coming House-designed promise (new and improved!) of a five-year period of legal status for 11 million victims of borders arrangement would be somehow “temporary” and reversible. Like temporary and reversible taxes. Ryan says “trust us.”

Along with the liberal media, ever-helpful and caring Democrats Barack Obama, Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi instruct the Republicans that another amnesty would help them re-gain the White House.

In his ridiculous amnesty radio ads Marco Rubio may as well have also have promised to equip Border Patrol agents with surplus phasers (set them on stun!) from the Starship Enterprise and to install transporter rooms every ten meters on the southern border.

History proves those promises would have as much chance of being honored as the enforcement in-the-future, “no-we mean it this time, really!” language in any legalization legislation.

A partial reminder of broken immigration enforcement promises from their own federal government that Americans have endured, from an outline from the Center for Immigration Studies in Washington, D.C.:

1986: Congress passed the Immigration Reform and Control Act amnesty. While promising and end to illegal immigration, the law prohibited the employment of future illegal aliens. The enforcement never really happened. In 2004, only three employers in the entire nation were fined for hiring illegal aliens. The (very) low estimate is that 7 to 8 million illegal aliens continue to hold American jobs.

On employment recovery, the Wall St. Journal recently reported that “even if the rate of hiring doubled, it would take more than three years to get employment back to its pre-recession level, after adjusting for (non-amnesty) population growth, according to estimates from the Brookings Institution’s Hamilton Project.” (WSJ June 24, 2013)

1996: In the wake of the first World Trade Center bombing, Congress passed the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act. Among its provisions was a requirement to develop an automated check-in/check-out visa system for foreign visitors, by which the feds could at least identify those who refused to leave as promised. Congress has mandated such a system five more times for all ports of entry/exit. No such system exists.

2001: In line with the 9/11 commission recommendations, the USA Patriot Act expanded the mandated visa departure system requirements to include biometrics. No such system exists.

The recently passed Senate amnesty bill actually dismantles the never-enforced visa monitoring laws. Reasoning? “Too costly.”

2005: The REAL ID Act required that state driver’s licenses meet certain minimum standards to be acceptable for federal purposes, such as boarding airplanes. The standards included requiring proof of legal presence in the United States before issuing a license. The driver’s license is essential to illegal aliens seeking to embed themselves in American society. The original deadline for state compliance was 2008, later postponed to 2011, then 2013, and now 2017. A growing number of states continue to issue licenses to illegal aliens.

Terrorists notice and take advantage of these dangerous broken promises.

2006: The Secure Fence Act of 2006 required “at least two layers of reinforced fencing” along roughly 650 miles of specifically designated stretches of the Mexican border. Less than 40 miles of such double-layered fencing have been built. The remainder is a mix of easily defeated single-layer “pedestrian” fencing and vehicle barriers.

The 2006 Senate amnesty scam died in the House. So must the 2013 version.

On legalization, we should repeat 2006, not 1986.

D.A. King
Marietta, Ga.

[King is president of the Georgia-based Dustin Inman Society and an activist on immigration matters. Twitter: @DAKDIS]

Citizen Bob
Citizen Bob's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/06/2010
STF: Polls, Principles

Per the subject line, the basis for your opinion differs from mine.

PS: Immigration isn't the issue. The U.S. leads the world in that legal process with almost 1,000,000 annually. It's the unregulated, illegal entry that's the issue.

PPS: The principle of individual liberty (parental school choice) led me to support the charter amendment. If parents don't like the charter school, they have the choice to reassign their children... without seeking permission from the state or local school board.

stranger than f...
stranger than fiction's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/27/2012
Political realities II and Liberty

Mr. Ross - I base my argument on demographics of the coming American electorate, not on some amorphous "principle." The GOP had better get on board with some semblance of acknowledgement of issues important to the Hispanic population in order to capture the White House anytime soon. It may be more perception than reality, but people often vote because of their emotions or perceptions, and the Republican Party is perceived as being against minorities.

PPS: Individual liberty is NOT advanced by creating more government bureaucracy. Before the amendment that you so heartily championed, charter schools were allowed in every county by action of the LOCAL school board. Giving more power to the governor in Atlanta goes against everything your tea party purports to support. The Georgia tea party did NOT support the charter school amendment because it INCREASED central government power.

stranger than f...
stranger than fiction's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/27/2012
Political Realities

Lets look at the facts: By far, the fastest growing minority group in the United States is the Hispanic population. The only demographic that voted for Mitt Romney in the general election were older white males. Last year in America, more Caucasians died than were born.

If the Republicans in the House take Mr. King's advice, they may appease their current base; however, they will make it almost impossible for a Republican to be elected president in 2016. Why do you think that Marco Rubio is trying so hard to get anything passed from the GOP that looks like a tip of the hat to Latinos?

Republicans preach this anti-immigration rhetoric at their own peril. I don't particularly like it, but it is a political reality.

Citizen Bob
Citizen Bob's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/06/2010
Fed's track record doesn't earn our trust

I concur with King's documented skepticism- I simply cannot trust the federal government's promises to address the illegal problem. As some emails ask, "If a leaky pipe is flooding your basement, stop the leak before dealing with the water underfoot."

A rational approach begins with securing the borders. That done, address the existing illegal aliens already here: enforce e-verify, impose meaningful consequences on offending businesses, deny taxpayer benefits & services to illegal aliens that haven't been mandated by the Supreme Court, and promptly deport criminal aliens.

Smells like big & politically influential businesses (along with some who hold a sincere but misplaced compassion) are driving the issue. If you're frustrated, call your U.S. Congressman and Speaker Boehner once a day with a simple message until the House vote's taken, "Don't give me another 1986; secure the borders before considering legislation that addresses existing illegal aliens."

stranger than f...
stranger than fiction's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/27/2012
Just bring in the trusty appointed bureaucrats to set policy.

Now Bob, let's be consistent. What we really need is the creation of a bureaucratic committee answerable to no one but the President to make immigration policy. That way the wise appointed bureaucrats can make all the decisions without any input from the unwashed local masses.

You so fervently championed this policy last year for charter schools; I'm sure it can work across the board with every important issue. Good luck squaring it with the tea party you run.

Truth is always stranger than fiction.