PTC tennis courts to be resurfaced

Peachtree City Community Services Director Jon Rorie bounces a tennis ball off a sample of the new synthetic surface that will be applied at the city’s tennis courts. Photo/John Munford.

Synthetic surface to last longer than traditional asphalt

Repairs are coming for 10 Peachtree City tennis courts in four different places, thanks to a resurfacing project that will cost the city upwards of $230,000.

The courts will be getting a synthetic surface called NovaPro Xtreme, which will have a different bounce compared to the current asphalt-topped courts, Community Services Director Jon Rorie told the Peachtree City Council last week.

The process will be used for the four courts at the Glenloch recreation facility, two courts at the Braelinn rec facility, two courts at Blue Smoke Park and two courts at Smokerise Park. The cost of up to $230,000 includes money to see if a sinkhole that closed one of the Smokerise courts can be repaired, but it may come down to deciding to abandon that court, Rorie said.

The new surface, which will be put on top of the existing asphalt surfaces, comes with a 25-year warranty. That means the court surface will last longer than the traditional asphalt surface as well, Rorie noted.

“Unless a root comes through or there’s a sinkhole, all you do every five years is basically repaint the courts,” Rorie said.

The city last resurfaced the Glenloch courts in 2005, the Blue Smoke and Smokerise courts in 2006 and the Braelinn and Pebblepocket courts in 2007, Rorie noted.
Rorie visited several tennis courts in the metro Atlanta area which utilize the NovaPro Xtreme surface, several of which have been in use for 10 years or more.

The contract calls for the courts to be resurfaced by September 30, with Glenloch and Braelinn being the first priorities followed by Smokerise and Bluesmoke, Rorie said.
“We’re working to get all the insurance documents in place, and contracts,” Rorie said. “I think you will see them starting pretty soon.”

The funds will come from the city’s $3 million bond for facility improvements, officials said. The city will also spend some money from the general fund to make fencing repairs where necessary, Rorie noted.