PTC planner recommends senior apartment rezoning

Complex would be limited to those 62 and up

A rezoning proposal to build 100 senior apartments off Newgate Road in Kedron Village is being recommended for approval by Peachtree City interim Community Development Director David Rast.

That recommendation will be discussed tonight by the Peachtree City Planning Commission, which meets at 7 p.m. at City Hall and is scheduled to vote on its recommendation to the City Council. The final say on the matter will be with the City Council at a later date.

Developer NorSouth has said the property would be limited to persons ages 62 and up.

In a detailed memo, Rast lays out a number of reasons the development should be approved including that it meshes with the city’s land use plan. The 5.62 acre parcel is designated for multifamily use, but as currently zoned apartments are not an option. Instead, the parcel is zoned for 21 luxury senior townhomes that never materialized.

Along with Rast’s recommendation are 14 conditions for the rezoning, including a requirement for NorSouth and all future property owners to follow federal age restriction and verification policies, which include the use of a photo ID listing each residents’ date of birth.

The development will be surrounded on Newgate Road by an existing hotel, car wash, convenience store and gas station, according to Rast’s memo. Those working and living at the apartments would also have convenient access to office, retail and restaurant options in the area including the immediately adjacent Kedron Village shopping center.

Rast also noted in his memo that the city’s over-65 population is projected to increase by 95 percent between 2005 and 2030.

Several city council members have expressed hesitation over the NorSouth senior apartment project in part due to concerns the business plan might fail, leaving the apartments open to residents of all ages.

The apartments are targeting seniors who earn no more than about $30,000 a year, and some have questioned what would happen if the company is unable to fill the complex. The income limit is set due to a requirement of tax credits allowed for the project that are granted on the construction end to keep rents affordable. Anyone earning more than the income limit can rent one of the apartments at full market price, NorSouth officials have said.

NorSouth representatives have said they have never had a problem finding tenants for its similar properties. The company also has provided a tour of its Atlanta area developments for council members, planning commission members, city staff and the public.

MYTMITE
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Senior Apartments

Just what this community needs at this time---unwanted and unneeded apts for seniors---when they remain empty we will then have a new, smaller Harmony Village or lots of empty apartments. We don't need this---of course the builder will promise anything to get those tax benefits and get his apts built and then move on. We've seen and heard all this before - as "they" say---deja vu all over again.

jevank
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I agree, Mytmite

You're right. This company has a bad track record when it comes to paying back deposits. Now with the 62 and older crowd, they know it's easier to keep that deposit. Old people with very little money seldom hire attorneys to sue for their deposit back.

Norsouth also typically charges an application fee or a registration fee. With the turnover involved with the elderly, it's a guaranteed money maker for them.

Some people may see this as a good thing for seniors on a budget, but they are out to take advantage. I hope our council does the right thing and stops this now.

pumpkin
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MYTMITE YOU ARE JUST WHERE YOU SHOULD BE

God Bless America that you have a right to your opinion.

normal
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MYTMITE you jerk

Yes we do need this. The town club apartments are about 80 percent empty because so few can afford rent from 2700 up to almost 5000 per month. That is the joke around here. It is a super place but come on. So this other apartment complex is needed for those great seniors who cant afford that type of rent. And what is your problem with Harmony village. You must think because you can afford to live in a better type of housing that you are a better person. Jack Ass. You arent a better person. You are just a moron with more money. There are some wonderful people living in Harmony village. There are worse kids living in Smokerise, Stoneybrook and Whitewater. Do you know why, well I will tell you. They have the money and are bored. So I feel sorry for you. You should never judge people by what they live in or the type of car they drive.

MYTMITE
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Normal (certainly a misnomer)

If you are not already a resident of Harmony Village, take a drive through there some early evening. As I have stated on another site regarding this manner, I am a senior citizen living on social security, which I earned from working all of my adult life. I live in a small house in Peachtree City. As a single mother I raised four children to be upstanding productive members of society while, on many occasions, holding down at least two jobs. I did this without help from the government or anyone else. I taught my children that if you wanted something you worked for it. They taught their children likewise and now those children are teaching their children. I tell you this to correct your assumption that I can afford to live in, in your words, a better type of housing. I made the choice to do everything I could to better my station in life. Not to own a big house and a big car but to work and earn the money to buy what I could afford with that money. I chose Peachtree City as my home because I liked the ambience and the fact that people cared about their community. If you want to call me a jerk for wanting this community to stay as near as possible to that goal-so be it. It reflects more on you than on me.

Davids mom
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After some research - a thought

A family that moved to Riverdale 18 years ago - and maintained a beautiful home and were very pleased with the quality of education their children received, is now leaving Riverdale. Why? According to them, when public transportation arrived, it brought in those who would rob them of the items they have worked for and use public transportation to leave the area. Their house was broken into last week – as were the homes of three of their neighbors. They are devastated. They made a financial and emotional investment in their home and community. I’ve only been here six years. . .and before I moved here I always lived in a community where public transportation was available to all residents. I’m not sure that public transportation is the sole cause of a changing community – but I’m not ignoring this families’ dilemma. I’m still listening.

Cyclist
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Riverdale/Clayton County

I still remember the realtor telling the boss and I not to move to Clayton county and that was 23 years ago. I'm glad I listened.

Davids mom
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Cyclist

We were advised the same seven years ago - and one of the reasons we didn't look north of Atlanta was the 'California' traffic on the 400. What reasons did your realtor give you for not investing in Clayton County?

AtHomeGym
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Cy & Living in Clayton County

Cy, it wasn't like it is now until somewhere between 1983 & 1990. I lived in Clayton Co. frm 1977-1983 (Pointe South-Jonesboro address)and things were just fine. And yes, the demographics changed considerably but I can't lay all the blame on that.

pumpkin
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THANK YOU MYTMITE

I recognize your testimony. Reading the debates and opinions, I have a better understanding on what "could" happen. I do see the impact this senior apartment dwelling can have. Perhaps stricter enforcement of dwelling codes and security by law enforcement is something to look at when you "take your rides" through Harmony Village. Does PTC rule out and run out citizens with incomes of $30,000 and under, seniors or otherwise?
Where do residents as those currently in Harmony Village go, or do they need to go? What are you saying, move to Clayton, or Fulton counties or anywhere else, just not my town?

The Wedge
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Normal, I cannot believe

that you are spouting off like this. A ridiculous and juvenile spewing forth of invective. Let's talk it. Parenting is a problem in our entire nation, maybe even leading to your little tirade. Although all types of socioeconomic levels commit crime PTC wide, where is the locus of criminal activity? Is it Smokerise? I did not realize that. I thought that the police blotter hit the apartment areas more often than other subdivision. I do not judge people by where they live or any other characteristic other than their actions. How are you to be judged? How do we want to grow PTC, or even the US? Shouldn't we have a plan that makes sense? People in this community have been burned by a retirement community that was converted over to lower income housing. Those are facts of history, beyond retort. People see this as a possible creation of another community problem area. To state that Harmony village is not such an area is silly. There are good people in all areas and all walks of life. But has Harmony Village helped your property values or the PTC tax base? There is more to life than that, for sure, but to name call and claim that their concerns are baseless is ridiculous