Enrollment declines could cost 27 classroom positions

Numbers could change, but right now the Fayette County School System is looking at losing funding for more than 27 classroom teachers and parapros, mostly due to declining enrollment.

Human Resources Director Reanee Ellis last week gave Board of Education members an initial look at the possibility of losing 27.45 classroom positions.

Ellis told the board that the school system has lost 1,050 students since August 2007.

Funding for the school system’s budget comes largely from local property tax revenues and from state funding known as QBE (Quality Basic Education) dollars. And QBE funds are tied to the number of students attending the school system.

Outlining the initial net reduction in an initial summary of personnel allotments for the 2011-2012 school year that begins in August, Ellis explained that 18.95 would come from elementary schools and 11.9 from high schools. Middle schools are expected to add 3.4 classroom positions.

In the county’s elementary schools, the largest loss of staff would come from the reduction of 17 parapros funded for the past two years by federal stimulus dollars. Those dollars were effective for only two years.

Ellis explained that the school system is working to place those parapros in comparable positions that are being vacated. To date six of the parapros have received placements for next year and placement arrangement for the remainder are in process, Ellis said.

The county’s high schools are expected to see 11.9 fewer allotted classroom positions next school year. Ellis said that total includes a reduction of 5 regular education teachers, 2.9 special education teachers, 2 IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) teachers and 2 IDEA parapros.

Middle schools could be least affected, with the reduction of one IDEA teacher and the addition of 3.9 special education teachers and .5 regular education teachers, for a net increase of 3.4 positions.

The complete story on classroom positions is still unknown and depends on conditions such as budget allocations during the current General Assembly session and, on the local funding level, the amount of money expected to be generated by property taxes later this year.

suggarfoot
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time to change a questionable rule

In the days of the majority rule of the 'three amigos', a law was passed keeping a senior teacher who's school was closed, or their job eliminated, from 'rolling' a junior teacher at another school.

When the law was passed, in my eyes, it didn't seem legal. At large companies such as Delta, it has long been the practice that during a downsizing, if your job was being done away with, you could move to another city and take a less senior agent's position.

This was gone over by Delta's legal department with a fine tooth comb and deemed the most logical, fair, and legal.

This law passed by the BOE should be revisited. As it is, some senior teacher, loosing their job, could very rightfully sue us and win.

I never saw the logic or reason to have passed such a law in the 1st place.

I'm sure repealing it would make a lot of teachers breath easier.

Chris P. Bacon
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The "rolling" rule

I remember the "rolling" rule, otherwise known as the "Please Sue Us For Age Discrimination" rule. The BOE would have to defend that rule by arguing that each school was a self-contained entity (subsidiary, if you will) which would be demolished in court by all the school-to-school teacher transfers.

There aren't any easy solutions.

I also recall Terri Smith spending quite a bit of time in one BOE meeting explaining teacher layoff selection. It really is more of an "art" than a "science", mainly because of the imbalance in qualifications. The BOE (at that time) was overstocked on English and social science teachers and understocked on math and hard science teachers, not to mention the different qualifications (middle vs. high school, for example). It's a situation ripe for political exploitation (didn't Smola's son keep his job?)

This sort of chicanery is why teachers form unions.

suggarfoot
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yes he did Bacon

I don't know if he ever got his certificate or whatever, that he was lacking.

I just know that the way it is set up, we could get sued big time. If I where a senior teacher, I would do just that.

I know some teachers do a better job at it than others. If some don't have the knack or patience for teaching, it is up to middle management to do something and should be dealt with at that level.

I don't belive in this strange law.

Cyclist
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Declining Enrollment and Funding
Ben Nelms wrote:

Numbers could change, but right now the Fayette County School System is looking at losing funding for more than 27 classroom teachers and parapros, mostly due to declining enrollment.

And to think that the school system hired another teacher in December. What in the heck is going on?

Ben Nelms wrote:

In the county’s elementary schools, the largest loss of staff would come from the reduction of 17 parapros funded for the past two years by federal stimulus dollars. Those dollars were effective for only two years.

Gee imagine that.

roundabout
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cyclist: there are teachers........

.......and then again there are different teachers!

I can understand that some teachers may not be re-hired, and some completely new ones may be hired at the same time.

It could be that the new teachers offer services that the old teachers could not, or did not! They may be more efficient, produce more 2400 SAT students, have extreme qualifications, or just maybe the teachers not re-hired were simply not very good at their work!

We obviously need more teachers with more years of experience and at higher wages. It has been shown in Atlanta that teachers with 10 years experience or more are more likely to erase test answers that are wrong.
If experience was of much benefit to teachers or anyone, then John Kennedy would never have been elected, nor President Obama!

These kind of problems only come to light in recessions and depressions when there aren't enough jobs to go around.
Also happens in the Judging business. Sometimes brand new judges do better than two much older and experienced ones.
The young ones also tend to stay out of strip clubs and don't carry guns there.
After all old people are a real burden to our country and it is going to get worse! Nearly half of us will be 60 or more very soon!

I could have said this more clearly but I hope you get the drift!

suggarfoot
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Where do you get off with

Where do you get off with such accusations?

"It has been shown in Atlanta that teachers with 10 years experience or more are more likely to erase test answers that are wrong."

Have you lost your mind? A good argument that a very new teacher trying to look good might do the same thing.

I don't understand your trying to SMEAR senior teachers like that.

"After all old people are a real burden to our country and it is going to get worse! Nearly half of us will be 60 or more very soon!"

What do you want to do? March everyone over 50 out to a mass grave and put and end to the drain on society that you perceive?

pumpkin
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RUN FOR THE HILLS

They are getting out of PTC running to Coweta (Senoia/Newnan) more bang for your buck and city mayor and council that know their stuff and after all the gang bang news on TV coverage what else could you expect?

roundabout
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RUN

I wish you people would decide exactly where all of our criminals run to.

First it is Clayton, now it is Fulton or Coweta!

Is it that most of Fayette's criminals are white collar ones? They don't run. They usually take money under fake credentials or in collusion with houses of finance, or favors from judge judging committees, and if anything head for Cozumel--not Clayton, Fulton, or Coweta.